Is this a good place to start a horse career? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 05-28-2013, 10:27 PM Thread Starter
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Is this a good place to start a horse career?

I plan on being able to do a bit of everything with horses. I want to be a barefoor trimmer, a riding instructor (mainly Dressage and Jumping), a horse trainer, and anything else I can manage to learn. I understand I have got a ways to go, but I think it is better to work out the big details while I can.

Is Provo, Utah a good horse community? From google searches I see lessons, boarding, etc. I see a lot of saddleseat horses for sale. Do you think this would be a good place to live?

Yes, I also realise I will go nowhere if I suck at this, but since this is a few years in the future, let's hypothetically say that I am good at what I do.
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post #2 of 9 Old 05-28-2013, 10:53 PM
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I know nothing about Utah..But I can tell you that you will NOT have enough time in the day to make a living off all three of those things. Trimmers can make good money (what I planned to do), but that takes up almost their whole life. To make a profit, you'll want a good number of clients and a well-rounded schedule. You don't want 80 horses scheduled for one week and only 5-10 for the next. Unless you want to have the worst time during those 5-10 the week after those 80. Your schedule needs to be similar every week. You won't have to be as flexible on schedule as a farrier that shods since there won't be the pulled shoe emergency, but things do come up with trimmed horses as well. You need to be extremely good at what you do or be extremely good at marketing. You can't get lazy either..One rushed trim from a farrier/trimmer over here and you've got the boot and I'm bad mouthing you as lazy and inconsiderate of both my time and my horse's health/soundness.

I can't vouch much for instructors..but unless you hit up and get in with one of the best known barns, you probably won't make that your career either. Every instructor I know has a second job, usually not horse related (or they own the barn they coach at).

And a horse trainer...not likely to make any money unless you have your own land, feed your own hay, and those horses are in and out with great results. Those horses also need to be registered with decent-stunning lines to fetch anything nowadays in this economy. People can't even sell a seasoned 2D barrel horse that's under 10 for more than $4000, maybe. And your trail horses? Maybe $1000 if they're registered, barefoot with no lameness issues, and are safe for the hubby that thinks his horse is the same as his dog.

I wish you luck, but make sure you look into everything thoroughly and ask trimmers/coaches/trainers anything they'll answer. It's not easy making money off horses, sadly.
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post #3 of 9 Old 05-28-2013, 11:05 PM Thread Starter
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I know nothing about Utah..But I can tell you that you will NOT have enough time in the day to make a living off all three of those things. Trimmers can make good money (what I planned to do), but that takes up almost their whole life. To make a profit, you'll want a good number of clients and a well-rounded schedule. You don't want 80 horses scheduled for one week and only 5-10 for the next. Unless you want to have the worst time during those 5-10 the week after those 80. Your schedule needs to be similar every week. You won't have to be as flexible on schedule as a farrier that shods since there won't be the pulled shoe emergency, but things do come up with trimmed horses as well. You need to be extremely good at what you do or be extremely good at marketing. You can't get lazy either..One rushed trim from a farrier/trimmer over here and you've got the boot and I'm bad mouthing you as lazy and inconsiderate of both my time and my horse's health/soundness.

I can't vouch much for instructors..but unless you hit up and get in with one of the best known barns, you probably won't make that your career either. Every instructor I know has a second job, usually not horse related (or they own the barn they coach at).

And a horse trainer...not likely to make any money unless you have your own land, feed your own hay, and those horses are in and out with great results. Those horses also need to be registered with decent-stunning lines to fetch anything nowadays in this economy. People can't even sell a seasoned 2D barrel horse that's under 10 for more than $4000, maybe. And your trail horses? Maybe $1000 if they're registered, barefoot with no lameness issues, and are safe for the hubby that thinks his horse is the same as his dog.

I wish you luck, but make sure you look into everything thoroughly and ask trimmers/coaches/trainers anything they'll answer. It's not easy making money off horses, sadly.
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Thank you for the advice :)

I plan on shadowing a good trimmer and learning from there. I'll have my normal 40 hour a week job for my paycheck, but I will slowly work my way into the other things. If I become good and successful, I'll quit my boring job and get paid to do what I like. I won't be stupid and rush into something that has the possibility of costing me more money than I get payed :P
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post #4 of 9 Old 05-28-2013, 11:54 PM Thread Starter
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Bump please :)
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post #5 of 9 Old 05-29-2013, 12:30 AM
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Ok, simply from a buisness stand point. It's a bad idea, unless you're are the best.

Here's the problem, you'll be the new guy, who's gonna be the first to try you out???
Likely the youngest, again, who risking their money???
And sounds like the market there is likely covered already, welcome to having to prove yourself and swiping accounts ( or horses as it may be) and having to deal with Angry peers in your field. Who will do nothing but make it harder to get good accounts. That actually pay.

It's a catch 22.

I'm self employed, buisness owner, and a jack of all trades. I have a name by working my way up. Now I have company's calling for me weekly. Some I can do, some I can't because I'm busy. The calls still come though.

I'd suggest you look into real jobs while you make yourself know in horses. There may come a time that horses can buy the farm. But I wouldn't bet your whole livelyhood on it.

Just my .02.......
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post #6 of 9 Old 05-30-2013, 12:27 AM
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In a word? No.

Trimming and shoeing is hard work and hard on the body/back too. And shadowing someone may not be enough, if you need to be certified, as in went somewhere, to get a good client base.

As for training horses or riders? That means hours spent as an assistant somewhere, which means you will have no time for another job more than likely. To make it in the horse world?

You only have one job...

Horses make me a better person.
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post #7 of 9 Old 05-30-2013, 01:05 AM
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As far as becoming a riding instructor or trainer, you really do have to be a very good rider before you can really start doing any coaching or training.
I trained my FEI horse, I've trained a few green horses, and I've shown a bunch of horses and have CDI experience. With that I feel comfortable coaching people up to about third level competently, and I have attracted enough students to basically pay my board bill every month. I could not however do it as a f/t job, that requires full time training horses and clients, which are difficult to attract without a lot more experience than even I have.
Unless you have the resources and time to learn how to really ride, and have access to large competitions and good horses, it will be tough to be a coach. Especially in Utah. The dressage and jumping centers of North America are California and Florida.
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post #8 of 9 Old 05-30-2013, 08:18 AM
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How old are you?
How much riding experience do you have?
How much showing have you done?
What is your '40 hour a week' real job?

You just cannot throw a dart at a map and be instantly accepted in that place when there are probably local, known people there that cannot make a living doing any of the things you want to do. You have to be able to do something special that people really want.

visit us at www.wolferanch.com
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post #9 of 9 Old 05-30-2013, 08:57 AM
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subbing!

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