horse rears - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 12Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 24 Old 09-15-2013, 06:47 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,189
• Horses: 0
All I can say is obviously she is evading for a reason, pain, tack, learned behavior etc. Hard to say...
goneriding is offline  
post #12 of 24 Old 09-15-2013, 06:50 PM
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ontario
Posts: 17,293
• Horses: 0
OK so now she associates mouth pain the the pvc pipe. I am going to suggest you put her feed pan about 15' on the other side with a few treats and lead her across. Do this at least 3 times so she associates crossing the pipe with a reward. Be sure to do it in both directions so she's crossed the pipe at least six times. Now trot over to the treats, again a min of 3 times each direction. The number 3 is very important as that is often the number of repetitions it takes to teach a horse. It hasn't a clue the first time, the 2nd time it's sorting it out and the third time - ah, that's it. Give the horse a break or leave it for another day then repeat a few walkovers before saddling. Be sure to have the treats waiting in the pan. Just center her (side to side) as her to go forward and leave the reins alone if you can. She should head for the pan. If she hesitates at the pipe, don't interfere. She's deciding how badly she wants to cross to the treats. It's her decision. If she turns away, that's ok. Walk her around and approach again. She's dealing with a big issue and the less you influence her the better.



Saddlebag is offline  
post #13 of 24 Old 09-15-2013, 07:03 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 29
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag View Post
OK so now she associates mouth pain the the pvc pipe. I am going to suggest you put her feed pan about 15' on the other side with a few treats and lead her across. Do this at least 3 times so she associates crossing the pipe with a reward. Be sure to do it in both directions so she's crossed the pipe at least six times. Now trot over to the treats, again a min of 3 times each direction. The number 3 is very important as that is often the number of repetitions it takes to teach a horse. It hasn't a clue the first time, the 2nd time it's sorting it out and the third time - ah, that's it. Give the horse a break or leave it for another day then repeat a few walkovers before saddling. Be sure to have the treats waiting in the pan. Just center her (side to side) as her to go forward and leave the reins alone if you can. She should head for the pan. If she hesitates at the pipe, don't interfere. She's deciding how badly she wants to cross to the treats. It's her decision. If she turns away, that's ok. Walk her around and approach again. She's dealing with a big issue and the less you influence her the better.
Ok, I've got the pipe problem fixed I just worked her in the round pen until she would go over the pipe both ways in all gaits easily that one didn't take me long to figure out, but the pipe isn't the only thing she's reared at, but I'm starting To think maybe I've been using mouth pressure to try to correct it when she afraid of something because it makes her feel trapped. So if that's the case then everytime she's reared has been my fault which I'm ok with because that gives me a new angle to work at it from.
Posted via Mobile Device
jesse horner is offline  
post #14 of 24 Old 09-15-2013, 07:54 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Watertown, MN
Posts: 5,540
• Horses: 3
You need to learn how to anticipate the rear and block it. The SECOND you feel her getting light in the front end, cue a turn on the forehand. If her weight is on the front end she cannot lift it in the air. Practice this 3 million times in an area where she has absolutely no reason to rear whatsoever, practice it to the point that the second you cue, her immediate response is to do what you said. Doing this will accomplish a couple of things. First, it gives you a safe way to stop a rear before it truly starts. Secondly, it'll help fix the underlying issue which is your mare thinking she doesn't need to do what you say.

That is your primary issue, your mare has learned that rearing gets her out of doing something scary. I speak from experience, my gelding used to rear due to herd bound issues. He would rear if I tried to make him go too far from home, if I held him back and let another horse go, if I didn't let him run home, and such. This is not a quick fix, but if done correctly is a pretty darn solid one.
MN Tigerstripes is offline  
post #15 of 24 Old 09-15-2013, 08:07 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: New Orleans, La
Posts: 408
• Horses: 2
Here is my cents and I know it will be ignored but here it goes. First, you need a trainer or at least someone who can help you with your horse. Rearing is the worst habit to break and once it becomes ingrained (at this sounds like it) it makes retraining a bit more difficult.

I'm still leaning on pain/tack fit, but for arguments sake, let's say tack and bit are just fine and she's got you buffaloed.

Start learning confidence and learn to instill confidence in the horse. I have a "confidence course" built but you can make your own and put it up and down as needed. I have 5 elements up at all times and another 10 that I rotate around. I always start with an easier task and build up to more difficult questions and then back off with an easier element.

example:
1) walk over 4-5 poles over the ground
2) walk over 5 poles set up in a star pattern (use a dressage whip or driving whip to encourage the horse to bend and use her body.
3) walk over pool noodles on the ground
4) have those used car sales flag runners set up in a 10' aisle (flags on both sides)
5) end with poles over ground

I have more elements from those statue geese, mail box (with balloons) and I have pool noodles set up for them to push through also. Tarps, have plywood on the ground, (simulates a bridge) and other obstacles.

Work on the ground with this course until you both can walk the course with no problems. Repeat with the addition of tack and bridle. Repeat with you riding.

If she starts to rise stay off her mouth and keep your balance, as soon as she hits the ground move her forward. Horses can't normally rear while moving so keep her feet in gear, never give her the opportunity to rear.

Horses just do not rear for no reason, pain and fear are the normal culprits, have her teeth, back, and feet checked out by a massage therapist and get a more experienced rider to help you through this.
Idrivetrotters is offline  
post #16 of 24 Old 09-15-2013, 09:11 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 25,656
• Horses: 7
This really is a hard one. I do agree with the need for a trainer but if it is not possible then you need to go at this with as much calm and understanding as possible. Rearing, as you know is very, VERY dangerous.

The biggest thing is forward motion. If your horse is moving forward, he cannot rear. Do not allow it to back up or stop. From what I'm reading, I don't think you have a fear or a pain issue, rather than a horse that is saying no. You will want to work on forward forward forward...
Celeste and EvilHorseOfDoom like this.

"Be a best friend, tell the truth, and overuse I love you
Go to work, do your best, don't outsmart your common sense
Never let your prayin knees get lazy
And love like crazy"
farmpony84 is offline  
post #17 of 24 Old 09-15-2013, 10:30 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 29
• Horses: 0
Ok she will do the turn on the forhand very well, I havnt tried that yet, it makes sense that it would work.
I have done the "confidence course" that's how I got her over the pipes so yes that does work to get her over the fear of pipes but hasn't stopped the rearing, she's only scared of white things in front of her on the ground ( pvc, ropes etc)
She will step over sticks logs and things like with no balk at all but like I said I've got her over the pipe fear.
You hit the nail on the head when she's scared is the only time she says no to anything I ask her to do. So I need to keep her moving forward and try to anticipate when she's going to rear and push her out of it, but being carefull to stay calm and and go easy with it.

Alll the advice has been great I appreciate it a lot and have lots of things to work with her on this coming week the fresh ideas is what I needed, cause I was stumped:)
Posted via Mobile Device
MN Tigerstripes likes this.
jesse horner is offline  
post #18 of 24 Old 09-16-2013, 07:46 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Watertown, MN
Posts: 5,540
• Horses: 3
Exactly. Also, try to ride her a ton without the scary things around. She'll get more confidence in you and you in her, so when you do face something scary she will be more likely to trust in your judgement instead of trying to get out of it.
Mikhala likes this.
MN Tigerstripes is offline  
post #19 of 24 Old 11-04-2013, 06:03 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 50
• Horses: 1
My mare has tried to pull rearing a couple times.
And I know from my own experience that 'keeping forward' is not always an option. If I put my leg on (loose rein), she would rear, if I tapped her up, she would rear. Sometimes that doesn't work. To prevent her from actually doing it, I one-reined her in a circle.

In that particular instance she was extremely panicked in a new area and I only circled her so I could dismount.
Since then I do loads of groundwork and getting her full attention and trust with me only before attempting these things.

M
Mikhala is offline  
post #20 of 24 Old 11-04-2013, 06:04 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 50
• Horses: 1
Agree with MN Tigerstripes.
Do a lot of other work first. No need to go over a white pipe right now! ;)
Mikhala is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Would you buy a horse that rears? LinkIsAGenius Horse Talk 41 10-17-2012 02:14 PM
Horse WILL NOT stand and he rears?? Help! Sis Driving 8 05-22-2012 05:36 PM
Help, my horse rears while bridling! fkonidaris Horse Training 23 02-01-2012 03:58 PM
Horse Rears easily..? Baylee Horse Training 9 05-23-2011 05:29 AM
Horse Rears When Clipping DoubleJ2 Horse Grooming 5 03-03-2011 09:07 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome