My horse almost killed me! - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 40 Old 07-20-2013, 08:39 PM
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I work a lot at liberty w my horses. When one on one w my mare, whom I trust w my life, I often carry nothing - and there is nothing I won't do while with her -including jog side by side or lie down. I have no reason to concern myself w where she is in relation to me. But, I'd rather not have to continue playing w her if another horse unexpectedly appeared out of nowhere. When I am w both my mare and filly at liberty, I always carry a training whip w me for both training and just in case either of them momentarily forgets I exist during some petty argument amongst themselves. I think it is good to always have one handy.

There is just as much horse sense as ever, but the horses have most of it.
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post #32 of 40 Old 07-21-2013, 10:53 AM Thread Starter
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Yes, although we were not "working" at liberty, the horses were just grazing in the back yard. We had given them a bath and groomed them to keep them occupied while the mare was taken away, but then we just let them loose to graze while we sat on the deck and watched them. They were perfectly calm by then. The mare was supposed to be coming back through the adjacent field which would have been fine, but instead they took her all the way around and unexpectedly showed up at the top of the yard, and when she screamed the boys turned silly, because I don't think they were expecting her to show up there, either. If my lessee and her instructor had stuck to the plan all would have been fine, but the "instructor" altered the plan because the mare wanted to come in that way, so in her wisdom decided not to let her. She actually caused a lot of problems that day, in addition to that, and will not be coming back.
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post #33 of 40 Old 07-21-2013, 11:14 AM
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While it may have been excitement and not an intentional "I am going to nail you" type attitude towards the original poster, a horse can be trained to be careful around us poor puny humans. Even in an excited state they should realize that lashing out at "us" is a huge no no regardless of how excited/in high spirits they may be. Now, a fear response is a little harder to talk about as fear can override training to a certain degree. The yield of the haunches is a good training tool as once learned, the horse will always turn their haunches away from a human..that is one of Anderson's favorite sayings..two eyes are always better than two heels.

A former boarder had a horse that was a human protector regardless of who it was. If someone walked into the paddock and any of the horses started forward with any kind of spirit or speed, he would come from no matter where he was, at the necessary speed, and place himself between the person and the horse. He would then herd the other horse away all the while making sure to keep himself in between. He was the head in that paddock so I never saw anyone challenge him and all you had to do was give him a quick pat on the neck and tell him it was OK; he would walk next to you while you went to get whatever horse you were after and would walk you back to the gate all the while keeping an eye on the other horses to make sure they weren't going to cause trouble.

We were kind of sad when the owner moved him to her own barn...he is now 24 and still as spry as ever but we miss his personality :)
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Last edited by tlkng1; 07-21-2013 at 11:17 AM.
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post #34 of 40 Old 07-21-2013, 11:39 AM
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A horse at liberty is no excuse for rude behaviour. I can't stand how people make this okay. this and lunge line BS. Youngsters are obviously still learning this, but I always have a crop or a stick if I'm entering the pasture, if I feel my herd needs a brush up on manners. Typically, my 'mom' voice works just fine, but I have a hard time getting my boarders to adopt the same attitude. My ity bity stick isn't going to physically do anything to any horse in there, but the power it gives me over their minds ensures my safety.

Glad you are okay, OP. Another notch, survived, lol!
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post #35 of 40 Old 07-21-2013, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by hemms View Post
A horse at liberty is no excuse for rude behaviour. I can't stand how people make this okay. this and lunge line BS. Youngsters are obviously still learning this, but I always have a crop or a stick if I'm entering the pasture, if I feel my herd needs a brush up on manners. Typically, my 'mom' voice works just fine, but I have a hard time getting my boarders to adopt the same attitude. My ity bity stick isn't going to physically do anything to any horse in there, but the power it gives me over their minds ensures my safety.

Glad you are okay, OP. Another notch, survived, lol!
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I agree, I demand respect and consideration of my space at liberty or in hand....but I only expect it after they have been taught manners.

And, I agree..it is always best to have a training whip or something.

There is just as much horse sense as ever, but the horses have most of it.
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post #36 of 40 Old 07-21-2013, 04:21 PM Thread Starter
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Yes I now always carry a lunge whip when I am in the field. Cody is not allowed any closer to me than that whip will reach, unless I approach him or invite him in. Even if he is behaving calmly, at least for a while. I am a little bit leery of him now, because I know how fast he can go from calm to absolutely crazy and he is extremely agile, being a youngster. His legs go on forever, too.
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post #37 of 40 Old 07-21-2013, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by KatieQ View Post
Yes I know I am lucky, it sinks in more every day! The horse will be getting a strong attitude adjustment in the round pen, even though I know he wasn't intentionally kicking AT me, I was just in the wrong place at the wrong time. But charging around like a wild animal in my presence will not be tolerated.
Why would you think he was not kicking at you? He didn't care what he was kicking at.
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post #38 of 40 Old 07-21-2013, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by KatieQ View Post
Yes, although we were not "working" at liberty, the horses were just grazing in the back yard. We had given them a bath and groomed them to keep them occupied while the mare was taken away, but then we just let them loose to graze while we sat on the deck and watched them. They were perfectly calm by then. The mare was supposed to be coming back through the adjacent field which would have been fine, but instead they took her all the way around and unexpectedly showed up at the top of the yard, and when she screamed the boys turned silly, because I don't think they were expecting her to show up there, either. If my lessee and her instructor had stuck to the plan all would have been fine, but the "instructor" altered the plan because the mare wanted to come in that way, so in her wisdom decided not to let her. She actually caused a lot of problems that day, in addition to that, and will not be coming back.
You are wrong, your boys should not be that reliant on the mare. I would be separating them permantently. I would be taking everyone different ways so they are not "expecting" anything. My instinct would also be if the mare was deciding where to go we would go a different way.
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post #39 of 40 Old 07-21-2013, 08:21 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by churumbeque View Post
Why would you think he was not kicking at you? He didn't care what he was kicking at.
He had been running around and kicking his heels up already, granted he didn't seem to care what he was kicking at I do not think he was INTENTIONALLY kicking at me. I am not making excuses for him or saying it wasn't a bad thing to do, but I also made a few mistakes there.
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post #40 of 40 Old 07-21-2013, 08:22 PM Thread Starter
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And yes, they are all very herd-bound, which is something we are working on.
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