Is this Okay??? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 16 Old 05-31-2013, 06:24 PM Thread Starter
Yearling
 
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Is this Okay???

So today I just wondered what Breeze would do if weight was put on her back, and more weight then just a saddle... so while she was laying down, I laid over her back putting most of my weight on her, but not all of it. Is this okay to do to a 2 year old?

Breeze didn't even blink, she could care less, it doesn't matter where I am or what I am doing around her while she is laying down, she just doesn't care.

Don't worry, I did not lay her down, she was already laying down half asleep when I went to get her.

But anyways, would this be okay to put some weight on her back while she is in that position, and that young?
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post #2 of 16 Old 06-01-2013, 08:08 AM
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I can't see why it would be bad if you did it for a few moments every once in a while, but I don't really have much experience with such young horses. Just bumping up with my comment so someone else can answer. ;)

By the way, it must be awesome to have that relationship with your horse from such a young age, lucky you!
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post #3 of 16 Old 06-01-2013, 09:05 AM
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its fine! just take it easy and walk if you want to back her. i just started helping my friend with her 2 year old. she gets on and we go for a pony ride.
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post #4 of 16 Old 06-01-2013, 09:29 AM
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Be careful! Don’t go sneaking up on her if she is half asleep, lay across her, and scare the crap out of her. You might find yourself going on a wild ride if she jumps up in a hurry and takes off (I'm being facetious, so chill).
I doubt it would be a problem. Just think logically, look what horses do with each other, without any human motivation for anything, when they play, as babies and adults, or as they run about. Guess what, babies trot, gallop, jump, and they even frolic, (I know! they frolic! What are they thinking? Frolicking before their bones, tendons and etc. and so forth have developed?!!! ludicrous, ludicrous I say! We should start a campaign, the A.F.F.L. The Anti Foal Frolicking League).
They aren’t as fragile as many people would have you think, they wouldn’t have survived thousands of years of evolution if they were. Just don’t go doing anything silly and your horse will be fine. Just make sure you stay safe.
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post #5 of 16 Old 06-01-2013, 09:42 AM
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Make sure to always be ready to finish what you start- it's nice she didn't care though. Had she reacted, you'd have to show her pretty quick that you leaning on her isn't a big deal, which would kind of force you to work on something you didn't want to yet- does that make sense? Just make sure you have a plan in case things don't go well :)

Last edited by tbcrazy; 06-01-2013 at 09:45 AM.
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post #6 of 16 Old 06-01-2013, 12:07 PM
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If she is that calm about it, that goes in the positive column for sure. But I agree w other posters, be careful. A stout 2yo can easily handle a person of a reasonable weight "bellying over" them w a saddle on to initially let them feel weight (from your post I take it you have already gotten her use to wearing a saddle?). IMO, it is a bit more safe since at anytime you can use the saddle to "push off" of them.

There is just as much horse sense as ever, but the horses have most of it.
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post #7 of 16 Old 06-01-2013, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys. Don't worry, I am always careful around all horses. And I DO NOT plan on backing her until next year, as a 3 year old.

I only did this while she was laying down, because I trust her, and even though she could have got up, or did something stupid, if I never trust her, we will get nowhere.

Its good to know that it is okay, because after I thought about it, I was like 'I wonder if I should have done that?' and don't worry, it is not like I will do it all the time.

My parents, family and even my boss say I 'have a way' with horses... do I believe it? I am not sure, all I know, is I can get a horses trust easily. The other day I was sitting in the middle of 4 laying down horses (including Breeze, and 3- 3 year olds, and I was in a position I could get up fast if one of them decided to act stupid) and my boss says that all of her horses took to me like they knew me all their lives, and they don't do that with everyone... I am really glad that I have a relationship with my filly like this, especially considering her age.
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post #8 of 16 Old 06-02-2013, 02:09 AM
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I think if you don't plan on backing her until next year you should stay off her back unless you have her in a good solid round pen with someone on the ground to help you lay over her back. As another poster said, if she had reacted badly you could have found yourself HAVING to back her to teach her that what happened is NOT something bad that she can 'freak out at'.

So in short, yes it should be okay for her developmentally but no, unless you're working on something seriously in training I wouldn't just go muck about doing it at pasture. It's not really 'safe' regardless of how much you trust your horse and can be detrimental in training.
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post #9 of 16 Old 06-02-2013, 10:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexischristina View Post
I think if you don't plan on backing her until next year you should stay off her back unless you have her in a good solid round pen with someone on the ground to help you lay over her back. As another poster said, if she had reacted badly you could have found yourself HAVING to back her to teach her that what happened is NOT something bad that she can 'freak out at'.

So in short, yes it should be okay for her developmentally but no, unless you're working on something seriously in training I wouldn't just go muck about doing it at pasture. It's not really 'safe' regardless of how much you trust your horse and can be detrimental in training.
Yep- way more eloquent than what I managed to spit out. Agree 100%.
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post #10 of 16 Old 06-02-2013, 03:41 PM
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Your horse, your life.

But let me point out that more than anything, you were lucky.

While you may have a great thing going with this horse? She is still a horse, and the consequences of what you did? Could be a price you don't want to pay.

Case in point.

There is a woman, 50ish, who was a barrel racer in her teens. Had wonderful skills with horses, been raised around them and knew well what she was doing with them.

She too had a good relationship with her horse, would go out in pasture, climb up and just sit there. Nothing on horse, and nothing ever happened bad....until it did.

For whatever reason, that day the horse spooked and took off with others. The teen came off. She became a quadriplegic that day.

34 years of sitting in a wheelchair, having to wear diapers, having to be pushed around, lifted in and out of bed/chair/car. Having to have BM's dug out of her since so many of the meds she takes cause constipation, dealing with bedsores. Can't do one thing on her own.

I think of her when I see posts like yours...

You may always be lucky, and nothing bad will happen to you, but if it does? Will the chance you took be worth it? Somehow I doubt it.
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