Is this Okay??? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 16 Old 06-02-2013, 03:54 PM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Saskatchewan Canada
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Okay... I was just asking if this would be okay for the horse to handle... I don't need the safety police telling me what I should or should not have done... Everything was fine, it is over and done with. That being said... nothing bad happened, but if I do this again, will something bad happen? I cannot answer that, but it is not like I am going to be laying over her back all the time, just every once in a while MAYBE. This was morely a 1 time thing, just to see if she would react.

Also, I was in a position that if she moved, even just a little, or reacted really suddenly, I could get out of the way.

There was other people there. My boss was there and she is a retired paramedic.
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post #12 of 16 Old 06-02-2013, 04:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Palomine View Post
Your horse, your life.

But let me point out that more than anything, you were lucky.

While you may have a great thing going with this horse? She is still a horse, and the consequences of what you did? Could be a price you don't want to pay.

Case in point.

There is a woman, 50ish, who was a barrel racer in her teens. Had wonderful skills with horses, been raised around them and knew well what she was doing with them.

She too had a good relationship with her horse, would go out in pasture, climb up and just sit there. Nothing on horse, and nothing ever happened bad....until it did.

For whatever reason, that day the horse spooked and took off with others. The teen came off. She became a quadriplegic that day.

34 years of sitting in a wheelchair, having to wear diapers, having to be pushed around, lifted in and out of bed/chair/car. Having to have BM's dug out of her since so many of the meds she takes cause constipation, dealing with bedsores. Can't do one thing on her own.

I think of her when I see posts like yours...

You may always be lucky, and nothing bad will happen to you, but if it does? Will the chance you took be worth it? Somehow I doubt it.
Thank you Palomine, I think this story of yours is a good wake-up to all of those out there who know (but tend to forget) that working with horses are actually very dangerous and even a simple thing which you might do for a cute photograph/story may have far reaching consequences. I am one of those who sometimes forget, but I promise, I try not to! I am actually in the process of taking life insurance out. Just for in case. Here's to hoping I will never, ever need it!
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post #13 of 16 Old 06-02-2013, 05:35 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Breezy2011 View Post
Okay... I was just asking if this would be okay for the horse to handle... I don't need the safety police telling me what I should or should not have done... Everything was fine, it is over and done with. That being said... nothing bad happened, but if I do this again, will something bad happen? I cannot answer that, but it is not like I am going to be laying over her back all the time, just every once in a while MAYBE. This was morely a 1 time thing, just to see if she would react.

Also, I was in a position that if she moved, even just a little, or reacted really suddenly, I could get out of the way.

There was other people there. My boss was there and she is a retired paramedic.
I don't think it's so much the laying over her back, but a quote from another post of yours...

Quote:
The other day I was sitting in the middle of 4 laying down horses (including Breeze, and 3- 3 year olds, and I was in a position I could get up fast if one of them decided to act stupid)
pulled apart, but not out of context. It sounds like you do this sort of thing often, and while YOU may think you're in a position to get up fast, horses are and always will be faster than people. They're prey animals programmed to get up and run if something scares them without worrying about themselves or others.

It seems like these horses have an immense amount of trust for you, likely because your boss has put it in your head as well, but the reality is that these horses are content UNTIL something happens, and then they dont give a hoot who you are or where you're sitting.

An older lady told me once not to worry, she was herding horses and they wouldn't run me over. They'd run at me, but they'd stop before they hit me- I (foolishly) believed her until scooting out of the way at the last second as she yelled 'run' and yes, those horses (my own horses that I trusted incredibly) would have run me right over.

It's all very nice and sweet and 'romantic', but keep in mind that horses are big, strong and dangerous and they don't bond to humans like they do one another.
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post #14 of 16 Old 06-02-2013, 06:24 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alberta, Canada
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I've perched myself on the backs or bums of my old broodies that were never broke to ride as they were laying down. They're quiet, handled daily, and I trust them as much as one can trust a horse. I don't, unless it's a broke horse, sit with a leg on either side - I keep them both on one side so if they should decide to jump up, I've just got to jump or slide off.
I've laid down with babies in the sun to get them used to buddy scratching.
I've had horses lay down with their head in my lap.
I suppose I could have gotten ran over or stepped on either of those times.

I suppose I could get hit by a car crossing a street or have someone fall off a building and squish me (no, really, I've had this dream several times already lol) but that doesn't mean I'm not to cross a street or walk next to a tall building.
Course we should always be safe, I've just never been to one to take it to the extreme and I'm still here.

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post #15 of 16 Old 06-02-2013, 06:48 PM Thread Starter
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Location: Saskatchewan Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WSArabians View Post
I've perched myself on the backs or bums of my old broodies that were never broke to ride as they were laying down. They're quiet, handled daily, and I trust them as much as one can trust a horse. I don't, unless it's a broke horse, sit with a leg on either side - I keep them both on one side so if they should decide to jump up, I've just got to jump or slide off.
I've laid down with babies in the sun to get them used to buddy scratching.
I've had horses lay down with their head in my lap.
I suppose I could have gotten ran over or stepped on either of those times.

I suppose I could get hit by a car crossing a street or have someone fall off a building and squish me (no, really, I've had this dream several times already lol) but that doesn't mean I'm not to cross a street or walk next to a tall building.
Course we should always be safe, I've just never been to one to take it to the extreme and I'm still here.
Thank you! This is what I have been trying to say after you all came down on me for 'not being safe'!

when I laid down on her, I had my feet on the same side as well.

But really, if you are going to do anything with a horse, you got to take a chance.

You see a lot of people riding bareback and bridleless, no control whatsoever, and yet still manage to stay alive... Why? Because they put there trust in there horse and it paid off. If I never trust my filly, I will get nowhere.

Yes. I was in the middle of 4 laying down horses. Did I trust them? Yes I did. Do I still trust them? Yes I do. Does that mean they won't do anything stupid? No it doesn't. They can do anything in their power to do whatever they want in the paddock, even if it includes accidently hurting me.

All I am trying to say is you have to take the chances if you want any kind of relationship with your horse.
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post #16 of 16 Old 06-02-2013, 09:52 PM
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You see a lot of people riding bareback and bridleless, no control whatsoever, and yet still manage to stay alive... Why? Because they put there trust in there horse and it paid off. If I never trust my filly, I will get nowhere.


Be careful, people donít do that kind of thing because they trust their horses, the do it because they have trained the horse, for many, many years, if not a decade or so, to be able to do that. Take chances and you will get hurt, it may not be today, or tomorrow, but it will happen. I have been run over by a horse and was nearly killed from the experience, I was smashed of a horse by two trees, one under the jaw, the other across the ribs, and nearly killed by it. I have gotten cocky training horses, especially when I was younger, under estimated them, and over estimated my ability, and now have a permanently bad back from it.
No on is trying to push you around, just trying to impress upon you the dangers of dealing with horses. It doesnít matter how much a horse appears to trust you, the day it thinks it is in danger, unless you REALLY know what you are doing with a horse, especially a young one, it will chose to take off to be with the other horses before it will ever come to you; if you are in the way, it will run right over you. Really, just try to stay safe; as I have said before, you should have YEARS of horse training ahead of you, donít go jeopardising that for some cutesy tricks with this horse.
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