Please Keep Chinga In Your Minds - Colic - - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 37 Old 08-09-2010, 09:30 AM
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I allow any horse that's colicking to lay down as long as they're quiet. I'm sure they're tired and they aren't twisting anything by just resting.

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post #32 of 37 Old 08-09-2010, 11:19 AM
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How scary! I hope everything goes alright. Why is he colicking so much? Maybe you already mentioned it but I didnt see it. Where do you live? Does the vet seem to know what kind of colic it is? Is it gas, sand, stomach ache or impaction. I will pray that he gets better and you can find a solution to end this for the both of you. Hugs to him and you.
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post #33 of 37 Old 08-09-2010, 11:31 AM
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I was a little surprised to read some of the posts, as I'm a magazine junkie and over the past couple years, the vets have drastically changed how they view colic. The experience is SO exhausting for a horse, they advise allowing them to lay down whenever they want as long as they're quiet.

Realistically, if a 16.3hh wants to go down, there's not a lot we can do to technically stop them. If they're that determined, it's worth a shot to see if they'll lay quietly. I don't think a horse has to be "moving at all costs".

I'm also curious - if thrashing can cause a twisting of the stomach, how is it horses roll constantly and never have this problem? I seem to remember reading something where all the hype about a twisted gut was actually being blown out of proportion, but I can't for the life of me remember what it was.

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post #34 of 37 Old 08-09-2010, 11:37 AM
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Ah, I found some articles online that basically back up what I was thinking about:

"
If the horse is thrashing violently look out for your own safety first. Your instincts will be to try to calm your horse, but a horse in extreme pain can be oblivious to everything—even a familiar and respected handler. Call the veterinarian immediately.

It has long been thought that rolling and thrashing violently may cause a twisted gut. But whether this is true or not has not been established. Try to keep your horse on his feet. Traditional colic care is to walk your horse, but if he is already tired from thrashing and rolling, walking may only add to his fatigue. Your horse will be okay standing, or just lying still for a short time. It may be nearly impossible (and dangerous) to stop a horse from rolling. Move him to a place where he is less likely to hurt himself or get cast if possible."
Colic in Horses FAQs - What Do I Do If My Horse Colics?

"Although you should not allow your horse to roll when he has colic - DO NOT walk him around for hours. This will only tire him, cause him pain and discomfort and make recovery harder,especially if he eventually requires surgery."
http://www.equi-therapy.net/equi-the...ic-horse.shtml




There are also numerous articles that support the "let him lay" theory that seems to be emerging more in recent times.


Twisted gut is a TYPE of colic, not something that's caused by colic. So perhaps that's where some of the misconceptions have come in? Although it did state that twisted gut can be caused by rolling, so I would imagine violent thrashing could increase the potential to twist a gut on top of whatever type of colic they already have.


It's a tricky business and it seems we STILL don't know the right answers!

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Last edited by MacabreMikolaj; 08-09-2010 at 11:39 AM.
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post #35 of 37 Old 08-10-2010, 02:49 AM
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I was told by a trainer that you give them 2L of straight red cordial. This puts some energy into thier sytem. Once the drinck it, walk them around until they go to the loo.

I have actually never heard f giving them beer when horses colic. interesting...

There is one principle that should never be abandoned, namely, that the rider must first learn to control himself before he can control his horse. This is the basic, most important principle to be preserved in equitation - Alois Podhajsky
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post #36 of 37 Old 08-10-2010, 03:36 AM Thread Starter
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We gave him beer. The red cordial can apperantly be very bad for them,,
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post #37 of 37 Old 08-10-2010, 05:25 AM
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Hmm. really now? Hope he gets better quickly for you

There is one principle that should never be abandoned, namely, that the rider must first learn to control himself before he can control his horse. This is the basic, most important principle to be preserved in equitation - Alois Podhajsky
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