Random Horse Facts! - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 34 Old 08-11-2010, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: West Central Illinois
Posts: 1,863
• Horses: 0
Technically, any horse that is a palomino can be double registered with PHA (Palomino Horse Association).
A knack for horses is offline  
post #22 of 34 Old 08-11-2010, 09:56 PM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: West Central Illinois
Posts: 1,863
• Horses: 0
A Palfrey was a Medieval light saddle horse that could amble
A knack for horses is offline  
post #23 of 34 Old 08-11-2010, 10:40 PM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: West Central Illinois
Posts: 1,863
• Horses: 0
I know you guys have more random facts!!!!

Some people believe that foalings gradually increase and decrease with the cycle of the moon; with the full moon being the peak of foaling
A knack for horses is offline  
post #24 of 34 Old 08-11-2010, 10:46 PM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,267
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Horses make 8 basic sounds- snort, squeal, greeting nicker, courtship nicker, maternal nicker, neigh, roar, blow.


My horse makes a grunting/groaning type sound when he trips on something or when he gets tired and I ask him for a little more It should definitely be added
sandy2u1 is offline  
post #25 of 34 Old 08-12-2010, 12:21 AM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: West Central Illinois
Posts: 1,863
• Horses: 0
Just found this one:

If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle; if the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died as a result of wounds received in battle; if the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.
A knack for horses is offline  
post #26 of 34 Old 08-12-2010, 10:17 AM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: West Central Illinois
Posts: 1,863
• Horses: 0
C'mon! These facts don't have to be strange, just random!

Horses have tails
A knack for horses is offline  
post #27 of 34 Old 08-12-2010, 12:23 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Gentle Island
Posts: 418
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by A knack for horses View Post
Just found this one:

If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle; if the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died as a result of wounds received in battle; if the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.

wow so interesting !!! That's cool

"Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined. For no dream is impossible "
AfterParty is offline  
post #28 of 34 Old 08-12-2010, 12:49 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 110
• Horses: 3
On horse evolution:

Hyracotherium (incorrectly called Eohippus or Dawn Horse) was - as discussed - about the size of a fox. It had 5 toes on its front foot, lived in marshy conditions, and had low crowned teeth (more like ours than like a modern horse).

As North American became drier over geologic time, horses adapted to the drier conditions. They became cursorial (running), and the crowns of their teeth got higher and higher (hence the "ever growing teeth" mentioned earlier). The higher crowned teeth were adapted to eating grasses, which contain a high level of silicon, which wears teeth rapidly. Cursorial adaptations included the lengthening of the leg, and the movement to a digitigrade stance (standing on the finger tips). Over time, horses went from 5 toes, to three toes touching the ground, to three toes with only one touching the ground, to a single toe (the modern hoof). The splints on the side of the leg of a modern horse are the vestigial remnants of the other toes.

At the end of the Pleistocene (about 10,000 years ago), in most of North America there were two or more species of horse living in each area. Most of the time a small and a large species were present. The small species was typically about the size of a pony, while the large species was close to modern horse size.
CanyonCowboy is offline  
post #29 of 34 Old 08-12-2010, 01:15 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 110
• Horses: 3
And some anatomical facts:

Horses don't have clavicles (collar bones).

Horses are members of the group Perissodactyla or "odd toed ungulates". Ungulates are animals with hooves. Other members of the Perissodactyla are tapirs, and rhinos. They are typified by an odd number of toes on their front feet: 5:3:1

The other main group of ungulates is the Artiodactyla or "even toed ungulates." This group includes hippos (contrary to another post), pigs, peccary, camels, deer, giraffe, antelope, sheep, goats, and cows/bison.

Horses (and most Perissodactyls), along with sheep, have both upper and lower incisors. Cows, deer, and bison only have lower incisors. This helps these different grazers "partition their niches" (each have slightly different eating habits). The animals with only lower incisors gather grass by "pinching" it between their lower teeth and the roof of their mouth, so these animals don't tend to graze the grass right to the ground. Sheep/horses pinch the grass between their upper and lower incisors, cutting the grass much more close to the ground (part of the problem in the Sheep/Cow wars of the American West).

Between 20 and 10 Million years ago, most of the adaptations to grazing were taking place in the skull of horses. The high crowned teeth required a deepening of the skull, the cheek bone (zygomatic arch) was strengthened to accommodate strong chewing muscles, and a "walled post orbital" was formed. This is the bone that "closes" the eye socket behind the eye in a modern horse. Humans also have a walled post orbital to keep the masseter muscle from pushing the eye out of the socket.

The strong elastic ligament that runs down the back of a horse's leg also evolved about this time. The ligament stretches as the hoof hits the ground, giving elastic energy to assist move the horse forward.

The modern horse genus, Equus, appeared about 3.5 million years ago, and quickly spread from North America to Europe, Asia, Africa and South America.

Horses (and all perissodactyls) do not ruminate (chew their cud), so they don't digest grasses as fully as artiodactyls. Artiodactyls have a multi-chambered stomach and pass the food through the chambers. Horses have a caecum that is posterior to the stomach that opens between the small intestine and the colon. All of this means that, in horses, food passes relatively quickly through the digestive system. This is also why "road apples" are so different than cow pats. The horse doesn't digest the plant material as well, so the manure has more fibrous material in it, and is more firm. A ruminant, like a cow or bison, keeps the food in its system longer, and digests more of the plant material, making their manure much looser.

The horse tooth is made up of three parts: dentine, enamel, and cementum (just like in humans). Enamel is the hardest of these, but is somewhat brittle. The differences in hardness between these tissues is what makes the surface of a horse's teeth rough, and allows them to grind up the plant material they eat.
CanyonCowboy is offline  
post #30 of 34 Old 08-12-2010, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: West Central Illinois
Posts: 1,863
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanyonCowboy View Post
And some anatomical facts:

Horses don't have clavicles (collar bones).

Horses are members of the group Perissodactyla or "odd toed ungulates". Ungulates are animals with hooves. Other members of the Perissodactyla are tapirs, and rhinos. They are typified by an odd number of toes on their front feet: 5:3:1

The other main group of ungulates is the Artiodactyla or "even toed ungulates." This group includes hippos (contrary to another post), pigs, peccary, camels, deer, giraffe, antelope, sheep, goats, and cows/bison.

Horses (and most Perissodactyls), along with sheep, have both upper and lower incisors. Cows, deer, and bison only have lower incisors. This helps these different grazers "partition their niches" (each have slightly different eating habits). The animals with only lower incisors gather grass by "pinching" it between their lower teeth and the roof of their mouth, so these animals don't tend to graze the grass right to the ground. Sheep/horses pinch the grass between their upper and lower incisors, cutting the grass much more close to the ground (part of the problem in the Sheep/Cow wars of the American West).

Between 20 and 10 Million years ago, most of the adaptations to grazing were taking place in the skull of horses. The high crowned teeth required a deepening of the skull, the cheek bone (zygomatic arch) was strengthened to accommodate strong chewing muscles, and a "walled post orbital" was formed. This is the bone that "closes" the eye socket behind the eye in a modern horse. Humans also have a walled post orbital to keep the masseter muscle from pushing the eye out of the socket.

The strong elastic ligament that runs down the back of a horse's leg also evolved about this time. The ligament stretches as the hoof hits the ground, giving elastic energy to assist move the horse forward.

The modern horse genus, Equus, appeared about 3.5 million years ago, and quickly spread from North America to Europe, Asia, Africa and South America.

Horses (and all perissodactyls) do not ruminate (chew their cud), so they don't digest grasses as fully as artiodactyls. Artiodactyls have a multi-chambered stomach and pass the food through the chambers. Horses have a caecum that is posterior to the stomach that opens between the small intestine and the colon. All of this means that, in horses, food passes relatively quickly through the digestive system. This is also why "road apples" are so different than cow pats. The horse doesn't digest the plant material as well, so the manure has more fibrous material in it, and is more firm. A ruminant, like a cow or bison, keeps the food in its system longer, and digests more of the plant material, making their manure much looser.

The horse tooth is made up of three parts: dentine, enamel, and cementum (just like in humans). Enamel is the hardest of these, but is somewhat brittle. The differences in hardness between these tissues is what makes the surface of a horse's teeth rough, and allows them to grind up the plant material they eat.
Your are right, it is the rhino that is genetically related to the horse, not the hippo. I was thinking about hippology. My bad.
A knack for horses is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Strange/ Wierd horse facts JustLeaveIt2Mya Horse Talk 30 03-22-2010 12:12 AM
Weirdest/neatest horse stories & facts?? Annamaria Horse Talk 0 01-24-2010 03:36 AM
horse and random sketches brighteyes08 Art and Craft Work 3 01-22-2010 01:10 AM
random facts Snapple122 Games 41 01-12-2009 01:54 PM
some random horse art i've done : ) dannys_girl16 Art and Craft Work 20 12-24-2008 12:01 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome