Sigh, 4 year olds *rant* - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 09:21 PM Thread Starter
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Thought I should mention... I don't react this way for every little thing. But he'd spent the last three hours being rude and that was the straw that broke the camels back, so to speak
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post #12 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 09:25 PM
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Well, he is a Warmblood right? That means there is draft in there, so it has been proven that they do not mature not only mentally until they are around 5 - 6, they don't physically either.

4 is young in a WB's world. He's young and immature.

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post #13 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 09:39 PM Thread Starter
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No, he's a thoroughbred (although I take it as a compliment you think he's a WB, they are gorgeous)
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post #14 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 09:45 PM
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no matter his age, horses arent allowed to walk all over you ! [esp huge ones !]

would you let him rub his face while you were riding ? i think NOT ! then why would he be allowed to rub any other time you are working with him ? its one thing if hes grazing or something...

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Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid. ~Albert Einstein
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post #15 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 09:50 PM
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For some reason I thought you said he was a WB or a Sport Horse of some sort.

Still is young, no horse matures until they are 5.

You can't blame him for knocking you in the face, when you put your face there in the first place.

You need to learn to be patient and work with him on a daily basis. Consistancy is the key. You cannot faulter once or you have to start back at square one.

When I got Nelson 2 years ago, he was just as "unaware" of where I was as your guy is. Thankfully he isn't a biter anymore, but he once was as well.

I don't agree with hitting them. You need to maker your presence bigger.

When Nelson would bite me, I would stomp my foot as loud as I could, and pin my ears back at him *Of course we cannot physically do this, but we can go through the actions and same body language*

You aren't going to make him "stop and think" by hitting him. That does nor accomplishes anything. He is thick skulled and not matured mentally.

Nelson used to walk into me, because his last owners never worked on that with him. He would walk right into me, walk off ahead of me and pull me around. He would get impatient with me on the ground and start walking in circles and not paying any attention to where I was.

Consistancy and patience. You can't lose your cool or your mind - you have to be smarter.

I have a very respectful horse now, but it was much easier to work with since Nelson was already matured mentally and into his own. I never hit him, but I make my presence bigger through my body language.

And you have to keep mind where you are, and where he is. You are the human, you need to be smarter than putting your face infront of his knee's.

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post #16 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 09:54 PM
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would you let him rub his face while you were riding ? i think NOT ! then why would he be allowed to rub any other time you are working with him ? its one thing if hes grazing or something...
Yes as a matter of fact. If their faces are itchy from their bits, bridles, reins - hell yes I let my horse stop and scratch his face.

If I was handling him on the ground, and his face is itchy - ah, yeah...I let him scratch.

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post #17 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 09:57 PM
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Yes as a matter of fact. If their faces are itchy from their bits, bridles, reins - hell yes I let my horse stop and scratch his face.

If I was handling him on the ground, and his face is itchy - ah, yeah...I let him scratch.

thats a terrible habit when youre riding !

if my horses face is itchy & shes tied i will rub it for her. its just not ok for them to throw their head or legs around

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Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid. ~Albert Einstein
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post #18 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice, but your horse is not Ben. I love him to death, but he is not always the sharpest crayon in the box. A big presence works great on him, AFTER he gets reminded why he should repect my presence. You can act as big ans you want, if you don't have a whack to follow it you won't have an effect. Little taps don't effect him either, he needs aone solid reminder that gets his attention and he's good. Stomping certainly won't help, someone dropped a shovel out of the loft today almost on top of him and he didn't flinch

And yes my methods do work. Before having a few weeks off, he was very respectful (and still sweet). Normally he will move back, forward and sideways when I wiggle my fingers and say "move up, back, over,etc." He occasionally needs to be reminded, and then he is very good about it. Thanks for your concern though
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post #19 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 10:05 PM
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Oh, he's cute...

My three and a half year old gelding (though he's not near as big... only 15.2 hands and not even a full thousand pounds) 'whacked' me across the face with his knee the other day too (I was trying to remove bot eggs from his legs)... I really got after him and smacked him across the chest with my hand hard and then made him back up a few strides (that may not seem like 'really getting after him', but to me, who, when I need to reprimand my horses, it's usually just a sharp word or soft tap, it's a lot), I swear his eyes got as big as dinner plates...

Usually, though, my boy is well mannered and acts more like an old been there done that horse than a youngester who'se only been undersasddle for a year and a half (since he was two).

Horseshoe Loop Farm: Home of Gypsie (22 y/o TWH mare), Dakota (10 y/o TWH gelding), Codie (18 y/o Walkaloosa gelding) & Harlow (9 y/o APHA mare)
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post #20 of 48 Old 10-16-2009, 10:40 PM
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Horses do mature at 5 years old, but that's like saying it's okay when teenagers do things that are just down right DUMB when they are 15 because their reasoning part of their brain isn't there yet. Yes, we can't expect them to be perfect, but we have to shape them- no just wait until one day they wake up and say, "Well, I'm 5 now so I have become a mature horse!"
I think that as horse owners we need to find what works for us, and the horse, as our punishment. It's great when you have a horse that aims to please and responds to simple things like stopping your foot and body language... that's what we all WANT horses to do. A strong bond and respect is clear in a relationship where a horse will respond to that, because that shows they respect you but do not fear you.
However, plenty of horses DON'T have that attitude. As long as you're not HARMING the horse, I think getting after them with more strength is important. It shouldn't be your first response, always aim for the body language, voice cues, etc... but if need be, it doesn't hurt a horse to be reminded. It's like a bite from an elder horse, the last resort but sometimes it's in line.

My horse is 11, and he's a total BOOGER when he hasn't been worked with in long periods of time. He's bitten my leg, pranced around and not paid ANY attention on the lead rope, etc. They all go through periods of time where they test you, but you have to remember a good relationship with a horse doesn't come from dominance over them but rather respect coming from both sides. If you work with him a lot, which it sounds like you do, he'll get through it fine. I'm sorry he's being a brat, but one day all of your work will pay off and he'll have excellent ground manners and you will be able to say you did it all on your own- and it'll be based on respect of each other!

Proud owner of 13yr old Paint Gelding, Bali! <3
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