STUD COLT what to expect - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 12:55 PM Thread Starter
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STUD COLT what to expect

I have a 6 month old stud colt. I have had him about two weeks. He has been very gentle and easy to work with. I haven't had any experience with with working with stud colt or horses for that matter. What can I expect from him? Will he become more assertive as time goes on? He hasn't dropped down yet. Will I notice a big change when he does? He is had of a great blood line and I am not sure if I want to get him cut yet. I may want to use him as a stud, at least have the option.

Need some advice on what to expect.....

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post #2 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 01:12 PM
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First question: Why keep him intact?

Secondly: As he grows older, he will grow more dominant. I have no personal experience with stallions, but I have friends who do. IF handled correctly, they can be good citizens and trustworthy, well behaved. But you better know what you're doing with them, and it takes a LOT of handling to get them there.

I don't subscribe to the belief that all stallions are rude and dangerous - no more than I believe mares are all hateful hags and unworthy of doing more than being baby factories.


But.


The saying is: Ask a stallion, tell a gelding, negotiate with a mare.

There's a lot of truth in that.

But back to my first question: Why keep him intact at all?

"We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us."
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post #3 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 01:26 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtokaGhosthorse View Post
First question: Why keep him intact?


But back to my first question: Why keep him intact at all?

See next answer, it came up twice sorry, I am still new to forums and I am learning as I go. Sorry!!
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Last edited by whisper2myhorse; 12-11-2019 at 01:39 PM.
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post #4 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 01:33 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtokaGhosthorse View Post
First question: Why keep him intact?


But back to my first question: Why keep him intact at all?
One reason, he is a super nice colt, blood lines makes him a perfect prospect for showing and his color is blue roan. I have already had several people ask me, if they could bred their mares to him when he comes of age. I know that I said I haven't had any experience with stud colts myself but know people that had with little problems. I am hoping if I know exactly what to expect then I can prepare on how to handle the situation. He is such a nice colt, that I even thing I would like to get a colt out of him when the time is right. Depending on how challenging he becomes will help me decide what I will do. Right now, he has been very respectful, and easy to work with.

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post #5 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 01:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whisper2myhorse View Post
I have a 6 month old stud colt. I have had him about two weeks. He has been very gentle and easy to work with. I haven't had any experience with with working with stud colt or horses for that matter. What can I expect from him? Will he become more assertive as time goes on? He hasn't dropped down yet. Will I notice a big change when he does? He is had of a great blood line and I am not sure if I want to get him cut yet. I may want to use him as a stud, at least have the option.

Need some advice on what to expect.....
I read this post prior to reading the one New to the Forum or Welcome to the Forum. The "I haven't had any experience with working with stud colt or horses for that matter" left me sitting here just staring at the screen in disbelief. I had no words. Then I came across your other post where you say you have 25 years experience with working with horses. Don't be surprised if you get a lot of advice suggesting the best thing to do is to get professional help because a totally green person with a growing and in-tack male is a recipe for disaster (or any youngster for that matter).

Is that the youngster in the avatar? He's beautiful. I have had colts...that quickly became geldings. Therefore, I have no advice on your situation except to enjoy the experience of raising a youngster to maturity.

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, it's because your tactics suck. ~ Marine 1SGT J. Reifinger
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post #6 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 01:52 PM
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So. Next question is - do you have the appropriate facilities for keeping a stallion and breeding one? A regular fence won't do it, no matter how polite and well mannered they are. Can you afford the type of fencing you'll need? They type of stall you'll need?



Do you have 25 years experience with horses and just none with colts and stallions? A little clarification would help.
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post #7 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtokaGhosthorse View Post
So. Next question is - do you have the appropriate facilities for keeping a stallion and breeding one? A regular fence won't do it, no matter how polite and well mannered they are. Can you afford the type of fencing you'll need? They type of stall you'll need?



Do you have 25 years experience with horses and just none with colts and stallions? A little clarification would help.
From. Post here sounds like poster has little experience with horses.

Most studs make better geldings,just because they have testicles. Doesn't mean you should breed them.
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post #8 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 02:01 PM Thread Starter
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Yes, sorry I had meant to put that I haven't worked with a stud colt or stud horse. Yes, I have worked with horses 25 years and have trained several young ones but they were gelded before I brought them on my property. I have had several people would ask me if my horse that I was riding at the time was a stallion because they would like to have a colt out of him. I had wished that I had waited before I had gelded him. I didn't want to make the same mistake. Yes, that is him in the avatar, his sire is awesome looking and very gentle. I am hoping that he will take after him. His dam is also beautiful and has a very easy going gentle disposition too. I spent a lot of time researching different stud colts before I purchased him. I know everything I can about his blood lines. I am looking forward to the experience of raising this youngster.
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post #9 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by whisper2myhorse View Post
I haven't had any experience with with working with stud colt or horses for that matter.
Then you need to have him gelded. Takes an experienced horse person to own a stallion,and use him for breeding. Save yourself some serious problems and geld him.

Stallions and breeding mares isn't a green horns business.
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post #10 of 53 Old 12-11-2019, 02:12 PM Thread Starter
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Yes, I am lucky to say, that I have the appropriate fence and area when he realizes he is a stud. I had it done, as I was searching for just the right stud colt. Also, my stalls were build with this in mine. The inside of the stalls or made of solid oak and was built with being able to withstand the abuse of any horse. These are very good questions. I think about things for along time before I do them. Blue Streak , Lakota has been a desire that I have wanted to do for a long time. He will probably be my last colt I will be starting and am wanting to get him the best start and advantages I can possibly give him. I also have 4 other horses. They are well behaved, respectful nice gaited horses. In my younger years, I trained horses for people with horse camps, hunting lodges and a dude ranch in several different states and they have bought more than one.

Just no experience with stud colts.....
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