Thin Soles - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 10-09-2019, 11:48 PM Thread Starter
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Thin Soles

Looking for suggestions to help a horse with thin soles! Was thinking about Durasole but I would prefer to invest in a permanent solution rather than a temporary. Was suggested Equinety and would love to hear thoughts on it! Thank you!
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post #2 of 10 Old 10-10-2019, 12:02 AM
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I used leather pads and shoes per my vet's recommendation for thin soles. Plus a biotin supplement. The best I've found is BioFlax 20

He had the pads for two sets of shoes, then shoes twice with no pads and now he is back to barefoot trims. Xrays confirmed his soles have returned to a healthy thickness.
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post #3 of 10 Old 10-10-2019, 12:07 AM
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Thin soles are often caused by poor hoof form. Often they can be helped the most by trimming that brings the hoof back into proper balance, without toes that are run forward/long. This would be my best advice for a permanent solution: good trimming.

A good diet will also help, and biotin has been proven to help horses grow in better hoof wall. However, it does take months to see the effects.
Equinety is an amino acid supplement, and I would give that to a horse that was having muscle issues rather than hoof issues, if feeding lower quality hay. A horse needs enough protein for hoof health, but studies have not shown adding amino acids to a diet already sufficient in protein helps with hoof growth. Most of our horses get a high enough quality hay to not be deficient in protein. However, many of our horses do not have completely healthy guts, due to intermittent feeding practices, and so do not produce enough of the B vitamins such as Biotin. Horses also often have imbalances in copper and zinc which effect hoof growth, so those are worth looking into.

That being said, you can't always get thick soles in a horse that has had hoof issues and is older, so other things may be needed to help.
For example, my TB's soles have grown in thicker after having good trimming for a while, but he'll never have the ability to run barefoot over rocks. He needs boots for work unless it is on soft ground.
Can you post pictures of the horse/hooves?
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post #4 of 10 Old 10-10-2019, 01:12 AM Thread Starter
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I will add photos when I can get them.

Perhaps I’ll have to find a new farrier. Mine only could recommend shoes without any option of fixing it with just the trimming.

She’s a new horse to me and I’ve only had her for a couple months. Wish I had history on her trimming but she has a solid and healthy hoof wall. Hasn’t had any issues with cracking, chipping, and so on. She just seems to have the issues with the soles, which is why I wasn’t sure that a biotin supplement would help.
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post #5 of 10 Old 10-10-2019, 07:47 AM
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Maybe your farrier didnt mention alternative because there isn't one. Mine has sensitive soles, but there's nothing i can feed or trim that will fix that. He's most comfortable in shoes and pads.
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post #6 of 10 Old 10-10-2019, 09:04 AM
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Pull metal shoes off (if present). Trim for a 3 to 5 degree palmar angle, allowing sole and frog pressure - make sure your horse has a 'heel first' landing at the trot and doesn't mind 'striding out'. Use hoof boots with padded foam insoles and make sure your horse gets plenty of exercise at whatever pace he's comfortable with.

Make sure your horse is getting adequate amounts of essential amino acids (a 'complete protein' like whey protein powder), and has trace minerals balanced in the diet. Biotin also helps. A slow feeder or slow-feed bag for your hay/forage can help your horse not go through 'gorge and starve' moments. Remove excessive carbohydrates from the diet. It's not so ironic: feeding for a good hoof coincides quite well with correctly feeding your horse. Usually.

Whatever gets pressure on the bottom of the hoof, will grow, so long as the rate of wear does not exceed the growth rate. Hoof boots will prevent the rate of wear from exceeding rate of growth, and "squishable" pressure from the foam insoles will accelerate growth. Hooves are shock-absorbing blood pumps on the inside, with armor plating on the outside. Or they're supposed to be. Problems come in from not feeding for better hooves (easily falls apart or flares, won't build density, invites infection easily, thrush), not trimming according to the horse's anatomy (which allows the hoof to function as intended), and not enough exercise (circulation delivers nutrients to the extremities, increases blood flow into the hoof, and increases structural density [ callous ] to the bottom of the hoof.)

No diet, no hoof. No hoof, no horse. No horse is not an option!
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post #7 of 10 Old 10-10-2019, 09:29 AM
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Oh, also:
Hoof Casts
Equicast

Sorry, meant to edit this into my original post.

No diet, no hoof. No hoof, no horse. No horse is not an option!
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post #8 of 10 Old 10-10-2019, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iSpeakBully View Post
I will add photos when I can get them.

Perhaps Iíll have to find a new farrier. Mine only could recommend shoes without any option of fixing it with just the trimming.

Sheís a new horse to me and Iíve only had her for a couple months. Wish I had history on her trimming but she has a solid and healthy hoof wall. Hasnít had any issues with cracking, chipping, and so on. She just seems to have the issues with the soles, which is why I wasnít sure that a biotin supplement would help.
Did a vet diagnose the horse with thin soles after taking xrays? If not, that would be step #1

My horse was NQR on the right front which is why I brought him in for the original xrays. He was becoming much better so we stopped padding, then we took the shoes off completely. Then I had follow up xrays at the vets, which confirmed his soles were thick and growing correctly
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post #9 of 10 Old 10-10-2019, 07:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
Maybe your farrier didnt mention alternative because there isn't one. Mine has sensitive soles, but there's nothing i can feed or trim that will fix that. He's most comfortable in shoes and pads.
Hi, maybe the farrier didn't suggest alternatives because he doesn't *know* of one. Alas, plenty don't look outside 'the box'. (Conventional) shoes, with/without pads can be an effective palliative, but they won't actually help the problem & are more likely to exacerbate it.

Hoof boots, pour in pads, keeping on yielding footing, composite plastic shoes such as Easyshoe or Eponas, with sole & frog support are but a few alternative to conventional rims for management & protection. Depending on diet and nutritional balance, there is absolutely something that may be improved there. True, you can't trim your way out of thin soles(well, maybe glue the bits to the sole you took off elsewhere...) but if trimming is not correct, or the horse is always peripherally loaded, with conventional shoes or otherwise, for eg, then changing that can also absolutely help/fix the problem too.
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Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #10 of 10 Old 10-10-2019, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Hi, maybe the farrier didn't suggest alternatives because he doesn't *know* of one. Alas, plenty don't look outside 'the box'. (Conventional) shoes, with/without pads can be an effective palliative, but they won't actually help the problem & are more likely to exacerbate it.

Hoof boots, pour in pads, keeping on yielding footing, composite plastic shoes such as Easyshoe or Eponas, with sole & frog support are but a few alternative to conventional rims for management & protection. Depending on diet and nutritional balance, there is absolutely something that may be improved there. True, you can't trim your way out of thin soles(well, maybe glue the bits to the sole you took off elsewhere...) but if trimming is not correct, or the horse is always peripherally loaded, with conventional shoes or otherwise, for eg, then changing that can also absolutely help/fix the problem too.
I meant more that in this particular case, there may not be any trim to fix or diet to tweek. Not that it's not fixable in all cases.

(But really, with the track record of random farriers, the trim probably needs to be fixed)
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