What does the seller mean by this? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 09-12-2013, 02:33 AM Thread Starter
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What does the seller mean by this?

Hi all

I have been looking at getting a second horse and am in the process of arranging to go and see a 9 year old andalusian x gelding. While emailing the owner I asked if he was particularly spooky and her response was that while he isn't a spooky horse he gets 'really big' when he is nervous. Does anyone know what she means by this? Is it just that he holds his head high, dances around? Dunno, I'm a little stumped.
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post #2 of 12 Old 09-12-2013, 03:39 AM
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Originally Posted by kiwi79 View Post
Hi all

I have been looking at getting a second horse and am in the process of arranging to go and see a 9 year old andalusian x gelding. While emailing the owner I asked if he was particularly spooky and her response was that while he isn't a spooky horse he gets 'really big' when he is nervous. Does anyone know what she means by this? Is it just that he holds his head high, dances around? Dunno, I'm a little stumped.

My take with that is he fills with adrenalin stands tall, alert and is ready to go. Which means he may spook. Any horse that is standing tall is ready to react.
So my question is why does he get an adrenalin rush, and at what, also how long for him to calm. Good luck with it

One of my horses backs out of the float and is as high as a kite, she is anouncing, I'm here look at me. Eventually the head comes down and its down to work

My blog foremyhorse.org you may enjoy the read. Its different.
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post #3 of 12 Old 09-12-2013, 05:19 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Stan, I figured that was it - I just haven't heard that term before.

Hmm, possibly may not be a good fit for a slightly nervous rider then.
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post #4 of 12 Old 09-12-2013, 12:44 PM
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As the horse can feed off the rider nope, not a good mix.
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post #5 of 12 Old 09-12-2013, 01:03 PM
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It depends on how nervous you are and how "big" he gets.

My best friend was a slightly nervous rider when she got her 9yo Arab gelding. Previously, she'd ridden a tiny (13.3hh) Arab mare who could out walk horses twice her size and spook twice as big. Siege (the gelding) is a horse that "gets big" when he gets nervous. He doesn't really spook all that often, but he definitely gets the head-up, alert, snort-and-blow typical of the hotter breeds (like Arabs, TBs and Andalusians). He also gets prancy.

All things being equal, though, learning how to handle Siege's "bigness" has helped my best friend's confidence grow by leaps and bounds.

So, I'd see just how "big" he gets and see if you think you can handle it before discounting him.
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post #6 of 12 Old 09-12-2013, 01:24 PM
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^^I agree with this. I'd go find out exactly how big he gets before completely discounting him.

It's a very rare and expensive thing to find a horse that doesn't spook. Most horses will spook occasionally and how they spook is the most important thing. My young horse that I'm riding now is going to be an excellent beginner/kid horse someday, but he still spooks. When he sees something that scares him, he gets "big". He picks his head up so that he can clearly see what the scary thing is, he spreads his feet in every direction so that he's as secure as possible, and he puffs up his body to make himself look bigger. BUT, that's all he does. He's very easy to re-center and once he figures out that the "scary" thing isn't going to chase him down and eat him, he completely ignores it and it doesn't scare him again.

I'd go at least try him out. If you feel like you get spooked by his "bigness" then I'd keep looking for another horse, but if you don't feel intimidated by it and can help him work through it, he might be a good match to help you progress in your riding.
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post #7 of 12 Old 09-13-2013, 01:07 AM Thread Starter
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Hi guys
Thanks for the input. I think I will go and see him tomorrow, she is taking him out to the forest where I could try him out which would mean I would get to ride him in a less familiar environment which is great and should be a bit drier under foot.
Here is some of the info she gave when I asked whether he would be ok for my partner to ride, who has less experience but probably more confidence than me at the moment.

'He is not a horse I would call spooky but he is not bombproof either. He gets really big when he is nervous but is not a jumpy horse. He should be fine with your partner if he knows a bit about riding and he can hold the reins etc. But I would say that he wouldn't be suitable for a learner as his main rider due to the fact that he is too soft and would get easily confused. New environments he will get big and not want to stand for the first little bit, I do lots of small circles and he settles quickly.'

Any idea what she means by he is too soft? Anyway am looking forward to meeting him and see if we click.

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post #8 of 12 Old 09-13-2013, 01:18 AM
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Sounds to me like soft is a description for well broke, and sensitive, soft in the mouth, possibly very sensitive to the leg as well.
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post #9 of 12 Old 09-13-2013, 01:23 AM
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Agree with smrobs. I had one of those " big" horses, too. He managed to get his 15 hands seem like 18 lol. But that and a little dancing was all he did. He never pulled or circled. In fact, he was the best watchdog I ever had, he alerted me more than once of things I would have missed and gotten in trouble.
With being soft she means just that. A soft hand is what he appreciates. Probably gets much more nervous when man-handled or forced. Sounds like an interesting horse.
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post #10 of 12 Old 09-13-2013, 04:10 AM
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What area in NZ are you and what do you want him for.
As you are going to take him in the forest see if you can get him to push through the scrub. If he goes with little issue he may be more settled than first thought.

One of the treks we were on in the bush midd north island we had to cut our way through. One of the organisers of the ride stood on his horses back cutting vines. Hell of a weekend.
I agree with the others being soft generally describes he will answer to slight rein movment. Whats he crossed with.

My blog foremyhorse.org you may enjoy the read. Its different.
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