Who knew that one horse could be so much of a problem? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 10:25 PM
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Start ground working him. Forget about riding until you gain the necessary respect and assert yourself. He's buffaloing you big time! Of course he's great in the paddock and loafing around, he's where HE wants to be (wait...or is it a she??) and isn't being bothered to work.
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post #12 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 10:38 PM
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If he's having issues trotting.. maybe there is an issue with his saddle fit?

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #13 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 10:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StormCloud View Post
Ok. So lets suppose that's what I'm doing. Running with your example, if I kick him once to trot and say "trot on", and he doesn't trot, what would you do as the next step?
Go thru the progression every time: kiss, squeeze, bump, firm bump, light kick, hard kick, whip. Every time. 300 times, if that is what it takes for him to trot at something less than a whip. Then the next day, and the one after that, until he realizes how life works.

But it would really help to see a video or pictures. Little things can confuse and annoy a horse.

Also, this can make it tough: "he is currently earning his keep teaching people how to ride at the riding school". It takes a very forgiving personality for a horse to teach people how to ride without becoming sour. Inconsistent and unskilled riding, repeated as nauseum, can turn a sweet horse into a bundle of nerves.

That would make total consistency on your part even more critical.

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #14 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 10:53 PM Thread Starter
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It's not that he doesn't want to trot. He doesn't want to trot WHEN HE'S ASKED TO. He was trotting just fine for me last week (with occasional issues of ignoring cues to transition down to a walk promptly). I'm pretty sure that it's an attitude problem... again, my partner Martindale has no problem (most of the time) getting Dubbin to listen to him. Interestingly enough, Martindale lets Dubbin get away with more than I do, but Dubbin is never more than very mildly recalcitrant when Martindale is riding him. Dubbin has just been getting more unwilling to listen to me. I much prefer to be as gentle as possible with corrections, but the key phrase there is "as possible". If I need to be harsher in correcting him, that's one thing; I just want to be sure that I'm not making things worse by doing so.

I'm perfectly willing to accept that I'm doing something wrong here. That being said, I've been doing my level best to correct him as and when he ignores cues by following my instructor's advice. Yesterday, it only seemed to make him worse, reaching a crescendo of awfulness when Jade (my instructor's daughter, and a very capable dressage rider) took over and was quite firm with him. Note that she's ridden him before, and he's been perfect with her in the past.

Advice I'm hoping for here is *specific* if-he-does-this-then-you-do-that stuff. Both Martindale and I are fairly new to horseriding - we had our first lesson in August last year. We *want* to do the right things, but we're still learning what they are, how we need to deal with stuff, how to calibrate appropriate levels of response to equine misbehaviour, stuff like that. For example, advice like "Do more groundwork" is a start, but if I'm to be able to implement it, I need a bit more detail regarding what sort of groundwork might be helpful here. Running him around in circles on a lunge line? Teaching him to stand still (like teaching a dog to "stay") at liberty in the paddock? What sort of things do folk recommend?

ETA: He's not in the riding school any more, and hasn't been for a couple of months at least. Now it's only Martindale and I riding him, with occasional additional sessions with Jade.

Last edited by StormCloud; 05-08-2013 at 10:55 PM. Reason: response to post that showed up after I posted this
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post #15 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 10:57 PM
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I would take him back to square one. Does your facility have a trainer who works with the horses outside of riding?
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post #16 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 10:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StormCloud View Post

Advice I'm hoping for here is *specific* if-he-does-this-then-you-do-that stuff. Both Martindale and I are fairly new to horseriding - we had our first lesson in August last year. We *want* to do the right things, but we're still learning what they are, how we need to deal with stuff, how to calibrate appropriate levels of response to equine misbehaviour, stuff like that.
You need to provide riding video then because at this point all we can make are educated guesses, assumptions, and drill our own 'advice' into you that may or may not apply.
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"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #17 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 11:02 PM
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Even little things you may not realize are happening can cause him to push you around. For example when you feed, make him wait until you want to give it to him, don't allow him to snatch bites while you are dumping the bucket/scoop or carrying it etc. (Not saying he does this, but I'm going to go out on a limb and guess he does) Make him realize that he can't demand things from you, even with something this simple.

Another example, don't allow him into "your space." When you lead him, make him walk an arms length away from your body, don't let him rub himself on you, etc. and certainly don't let him push/bump you out of HIS way.
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post #18 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 11:05 PM
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Are you keeping too much tension on the reins and accidentally holding him back?

If you ask him to stop and he does, you need to immediately let the pressure off.
If you ask him to trot, and he won't, immediately smack him with your crop. Don't get mad, frustrated, angry, etc.

Just ask, correct, and immediately reward good behavior by stopping the correction when he responds.

He is being a pain because he has your number. Just keep working with him under a trainer and he will straighten out. He will learn that the easiest thing to do is to act polite and do his job.
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Celeste
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post #19 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 11:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
You need to provide riding video then because at this point all we can make are educated guesses, assumptions, and drill our own 'advice' into you that may or may not apply.
OK, here's the best I can manage at present: a short clip of me riding Dubbin back in February. Dubbin's being ok here... just his normal level of not-too-bad interspersed with occasional moments of doing-his-own-thing. My riding's no doubt improved a bit since then (I have weekly lessons). Is this of any help?



(I'd have embedded it, but the embed code didn't seem to work)
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post #20 of 61 Old 05-08-2013, 11:12 PM
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I can't get the link to work.

Celeste
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