Is 9 too old? (To become a competition horse) - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 12:51 PM Thread Starter
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Is 9 too old? (To become a competition horse)

I'm considering buying a 9 year old purebred, registered (with papers) mare. Originally I was intending to purchase something younger, 3-5, to train myself.

However, this mare is a great deal. My favourite breed (Canadian) and well built etc. But I want something to replace my aging mare (also a purebred Canadian) who I have used in 1m jumpers and low level eventing (training level and below)

Is 9 too old to consider training to use as a casual competition horse ? Shes green broke, been ridden but never jumped or been in consistent work. Another thought I had was to breed her and get a purebred baby out of her, but waiting 4 or 5 years to have something else to ride isnt exactly what I want either.
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post #2 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 12:59 PM
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Nine years old is pretty young for a horse; and in my opinion, it is their prime.

However, if she is green, you have to take in to account the time it takes to train her. "Rome wasn't build in a day." It takes a lot of time and effort to train a competition horse - even at low levels. In reality, you aren't buying a nine-year-old - you could buying something more like a ten, eleven, twelve, or even a thirteen-year-old horse... depending how how things go.... Even that, in my opinion, isn't too old for a horse, depending on how they are cared for, their "job", and their health.

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Originally Posted by Jaimee Rodgers View Post
Another thought I had was to breed her and get a purebred baby out of her, but waiting 4 or 5 years to have something else to ride isnt exactly what I want either.
Not to nit-pick or anything, but this is kind-of bothering me. A horse - bred, born, raised, and trained - isn't "just something else to ride...."
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post #3 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 01:01 PM
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I was always told that 8-12 was the perfect age.

@my2geldings is a big Canadian Horse person - she may feel inclined to join in the thread.
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post #4 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 01:22 PM Thread Starter
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I'm aware of the time it will take to train her, which is my concern - if shes never been worked hard, and been well cared for her entire life otherwise; can I expect her to be physically able to compete at low levels comfortably at 12,14,16 ?

About the baby - I love to ride, jumping especially. And I have decided to retire my older girl from hard work because shes developing arthritis, and I want to keep her around healthy and happy as long as possible. But I dont want to give up do all the things I love (eventing etc) so I am looking to buy something to "replace" her. If I bred for a new completion horse, I wouldn't feel comfortable jumping a horse until it was at least 4 or 5, and definitely not working them hard either. So doesnt that negate the purpose of getting a replacement at all ?
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post #5 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 01:26 PM Thread Starter
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Also I'm a suck who doesnt sell horses, unless I know where they are going personally and always with a buy-back clause. So I would most likely be taking her on for life, and riding her as a pleasure animal at minimum. Not talking about breeding her and keeping her as a pasture potato or selling her.
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post #6 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 01:27 PM
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Iíve just bought a very green 11 year old, who I hope to compete on, in Western Dressage. I had hoped that it would be a quick journey, looking at her progress, it is going to take a while. I think she is worth it, she is my Warmblood, bought cheap because of her greenes, Iím investing a lot of time and money in her, itís a gamble. Pay and pray!

If you want to jump her, I would want to see her free jumped at least, get a feel for her scope and willingness.
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post #7 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by farmpony84 View Post
I was always told that 8-12 was the perfect age.

@my2geldings is a big Canadian Horse person - she may feel inclined to join in the thread.
Thanks for tagging me I had not seen this thread!

No it's definitely not to old. It's in fact the perfect age. Most Canadians aren't done growing and filling in until they are 7-8 yrs of age anyways so this would be perfect.
Even if she is green broke, you can still become very highly competitive if you want-she's mature mentally and physically and as long as you have the experience or have someone with experience aiding you there, you can definitely do it.

I have a Canadian mare who is turning 6 this year *gasp* and she barely scratched the surface in jumping in 2018 because she was still quite young. We will be doing more this year. Also have a 4 yr old mare(turning 4 in summer 2019) *gasp* (my babies are growing so fast!), and I will only get her started this year, also because she is quite young.

Canadians are incredibly smart and quick learners and very athletic so you can really achieve whatever you're willing to put work into.

You're going to have some fun with this mare if you get her. How exciting! they are a phenomenal breed of horse. I have a million pictures but will just post one. If you click on my signature you'll get my blog and see lots more about our Canadian Horses. Where are you located?
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post #8 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 01:36 PM Thread Starter
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@my2geldings , I'm in Northern ontario 😊 I am also very passionate about the Canadians - I have found them to make great low level jumpers and amazing partners in general.

I have trained a handful of horses from scratch before, and many how to jump- not worried about training her. Or her mind, she has that classic Canadian intelligence.

You have definitely helped to put my mind at ease about her long term physical condition. I know Canadians are hardy but I also dont want to retire a horse essentially as soon as its trained!
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post #9 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 01:56 PM
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This is my husband and his gelding. We just finished our first year of distance riding, photo is from one of the last 30 mile rides of the season.

DH's gelding turned 17 in August. We are planning for him to do a 50 mile ride in May. He was not ridden until he was 14 and spent life as a pasture puff before that. He doesn't have any physical issues or need any special maintenance.

I know it's not the sport that you plan to do with your horse but I just wanted to show you that 9 is young. There's no reason, assuming the horse doesn't have any pre-existing conditions or develop any, that the horse can't be happy and healthy and compete into it's 20's! A 27 year old horse finished the toughest 100 mile Endurance ride this year in 13th place and I see tons of 20+ horses still competing in 25 and 50 mile rides.
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post #10 of 11 Old 12-28-2018, 04:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaimee Rodgers View Post
@my2geldings
I have trained a handful of horses from scratch before, and many how to jump- not worried about training her.
You have definitely helped to put my mind at ease about her long term physical condition. I know Canadians are hardy but I also dont want to retire a horse essentially as soon as its trained!
That's fantastic even better! I wouldn't be looking at retiring her anytime soon. EVen if she takes let's say 1.5 yrs to foal, I think I would absolutely throw her back into training/riding showing or whatever you want to do. This mare is young at 9! you have so much you can do with her. Train her, breed let her have a 1.5 off then get right back on and continue where you left off until she actually gets old in her late teens to consider even partially retiring her.

I can easily count 6-10 people I personally know who are still super active with their 18+ something Canadians. These horses love to work especially if it's something they love doing. My girlfriend's dad drives hers 20 miles a day and he's a 26 yr old gelding and he freaking loves it! that horse looks incredible and acts like a 5 yr old DOG.
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