Bad horse!! - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 53 Old 03-18-2020, 09:48 PM Thread Starter
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Bad horse!!

So, i have an issue. my horse is a bit of a goof, sometimes he bucks and sometimes i fall off. I ride him quite frequently and heís a bit of a goofy guy so iíve fallen off a lot in our past couple years haha. He has no issues with soreness/tack issues, itís literally just his personality. the silliness has never been an issue but this past few months iíve had a HUGE issue with him kicking at me when i fall off. He only started doing this the past little while, heís been vet checked since and nothing is wrong he is perfectly healthy. i donít know where he got this from or why he started to kick at me when i fall. Today, i fell off and he actually kicked me twice. Iím not sure how to fix this??? Like obviously i can get after him once i manage to get myself b
up but i donít think thatís really going to do anything. what the heck should i do? Like i said, itís not the bucking or falling off part, itís the fact that he acts like an idiot and kicks me once iím down.

Last edited by loosie; 03-19-2020 at 05:10 AM.
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post #2 of 53 Old 03-18-2020, 09:59 PM
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Are you riding bareback or with a saddle? How long/ how much experience/ training have you had in learning to ride? How much training does your horse have under saddle?
Off the top of my head, I'd advise learning not to fall off so much.
loosie, AnitaAnne, bsms and 3 others like this.
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post #3 of 53 Old 03-18-2020, 10:50 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HombresArablegacy View Post
Are you riding bareback or with a saddle? How long/ how much experience/ training have you had in learning to ride? How much training does your horse have under saddle?
Off the top of my head, I'd advise learning not to fall off so much.
i have been riding for almost 8 years with a trainer and my horse is not close to green, he is 17 and is quite a push button horse. just an idiot. he is quite hard to stay on and he bucks very hard. i do not fall off often anymore but that wasnít the point of the post 🙂 the point was to ask why he would kick all of a sudden when i fall.

Last edited by loosie; 03-19-2020 at 05:28 AM.
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post #4 of 53 Old 03-18-2020, 11:50 PM
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Maybe make sure you're letting go of the reins when you fall? Some horses can absolutely hate getting jerked in the mouth, even if they bring it upon themselves. Otherwise, a good tuck and roll?
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post #5 of 53 Old 03-19-2020, 12:41 AM
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wait a minute! why is he bucking you off in the first place? you should not accept nor ignore this. He wants you off, for some reason, and this feeling is getting stronger.


what happens when he gets you off? I mean, before the bucking event, as you are going off, and afterward? Do you jump up off the ground and shank the reins?


What starts the bucking? like, you asked him to canter, . . . or other horses cantered off, . . or . .



horses are emotional creature. He isn't just being a 'expletive'. He is expressing how he feels, and YOU have something to do with that.



Think about it.
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post #6 of 53 Old 03-19-2020, 02:29 AM
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I DO NOT agree with the above.

Some horses have strong characters with a great sense of humour and, this does not decrease with age.

I think this horse sets himself a challenge to see how he can drop his rider and is now lashing out as he does so.

I have seen this so many times, where a horse bucks it's rider off on several occasions then when ridden by someone who can sit those bucks, give strong correction for them doing it and that can end the story.
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post #7 of 53 Old 03-19-2020, 06:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
I have seen this so many times, where a horse bucks it's rider off on several occasions then when ridden by someone who can sit those bucks, give strong correction for them doing it and that can end the story.
^^^This.

There is nothing cute about a horse who makes a habit out of bucking. He is an ďidiotĒ because he has been allowed to become one. No excuses. I own a horse thatís a con artist- heís been with me 24 of his 26 years, in part because he IS a con artist and could have become an ďidiot ď and dangerous in the wrong hands.

Even if the bucking issues might be pain related (a chiropractor would know that), the kicking out business once he got you off is an escalation of pretty bad behavior.

If youíre riding bareback, your balance is not good enough to ride him out of a buck, which is what he needs - plain and simple - ridden out of the bucks.

My guess is that, even if someone else does get him out of the bucks, he is smart enough to know the minute you get back on him you may not be able to hang in there, he will try you, and you need a saddle on him that fits him.

You are creating a dangerous horse and that needs fixed óó-

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #8 of 53 Old 03-19-2020, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by emma0311 View Post
Like obviously i can get after him once i manage to get myself b
up but i donít think thatís really going to do anything
You're right - or at least, it won't do anything beneficial to you. Horses learn from *instant* consequences, so if you can't punish him effectively *while* he's bucking/kicking, then all you'll be punishing is whatever is going on at the time you finally get around to it.

I'm quite... perplexed that you're not at all concerned about all the getting bucked off. I gather you're quite young. Sounds like you're lucky not to have been hurt badly yet, but that luck is not likely to hold. You will end up hurt badly(hope that's all) if you keep riding him. Another thing with consequences is, if something works for a horse(there's instant desirable consequences - he gets you off), they will do it again, get better at it, more confirmed. And if it only works sometimes, *they will try harder* so if he's bucking & you're coming off after 2 years, he's pretty 'well trained' in doing this now, and yes, he will have learned to buck harder as you have become better able to sit the smaller ones.

To teach him not to do it would first entail ensuring the rider NEVER EVER came off. Even with a good bronc rider, it'd probably be extremely difficult to get him reliably out of it now. So... I'd start with employing a very good bronc rider, and become very good at riding broncs & not coming off yourself, if you want to keep riding him.

So... I'd absolutely 1000% be very concerned about the bucking, and even if you're... Wolverine & always bounce back from injury, letting him continue to buck you off will pretty much ensure you can't fix the kicking at you either. So you're extremely mistaken to be unconcerned with the bucking. Will you bounce back from a kick in the head? & if you care for the horse, what do you think will become of a horse like this if you're in ICU? I'm also interested to hear that you have been riding in front of a trainer & what have they said about it?

As for kicking you while you're down, he's not being an 'idiot', he's just being a horse. Perhaps something IS bothering him, causing him to want you off, and he's trying to tell you more clearly that he hates it, or he is frightened & reactive about you landing at his feet, or he is confirming who's boss, or, like Foxhunter suggested & you seem to be thinking, he's just playing, it's all a game to him & he's just playing 'tag' with you after he dumps you.

Firstly, I do think it is indeed a big possibility Tiny is right & he's not just playing, but something is wrong, he's been trying to communicate, be it physically or with your riding/training - something you're doing/not doing. I'd want to be absolutely sure there were no physical reason he wants you off, before addressing it as a training issue. So wondering what exactly you have tried, besides a 'vet check' to rule out/fix any discomfort/pain? Eg. bodyworker? Saddle fitter? Nutrition? You're bouncing on him, his feet, teeth, the bit...? Whether or not it is physical, as explained above, this 'training' will have ensured he will keep it up even if you ensure you effectively eradicate physical probs now.

Last edited by loosie; 03-19-2020 at 08:22 AM.
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post #9 of 53 Old 03-19-2020, 08:15 AM
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There are contradictions in the descriptions you provided us. What I define as a finished, push button horse does not include the behavior or bucking. If a horse is bucking there is something wrong which could be pain or training related. So the first thing I would address is why is your horse bucking. Once the reason for the bucking is identified you can then look for a solution to eliminate the bucking.

I would first have a vet check done to insure the horse is sound. If the horse is sound you then can eliminate pain from the equation and work on identifying other reasons the horse needs to buck. This behavior could be from holes in training, self-preservation or even learned behavior that a horse uses to not be ridden or worked.

The real problem here is the bucking, and not that you get thrown off.
Best of luck
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post #10 of 53 Old 03-19-2020, 09:38 AM
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Bucking can be a bad habit or it can be forma reason.

What is he being fed? Over feeding and under exercised can also Ben a cause.

A woman I knew bred her own horses. She was a great rider and very experienced, however she had more than one accident coming off her horses. I was asked if I could go ride them.

First ride out was in the beach. She was on the mare and I on the gelding (full brother and sister) both horses were very spookywe rode under the lifeboat launch, all concrete. Half way under the horse I was in started to buck. Not funny as he was 17 hands and I only had about 12" head clearance.

With him bucking I had to go forward and as soon as he was clear he really bucked hard. Luckily I could rode a buck and stayed on him. I jerked his head by socking him in the teeth with one rein at the same time booting him forward hard with legs and whip. I pulled him around and made him go back and forth under that ramp without any question of him messing around.

Owner was a bit shocked at the treatment I had dealt out. I was told it was a perfectly normal thing for him to do. Not with me it wasn't!


The mare would also buck and boy, she was agile in doing it! We were hunting one day and the owner was dropped from the mare, it was not a good fall and owner ended up with a busted shoulder and arm.

I will admit I did have a touch of sympathy for those two horses as I took over the riding of them. I took the mare hunting knowing she would try the same trick so, I unloaded about 5 miles from the Meet. After warming her up I took her into a ploughed field and worked her hard around that. When she was truly tired I took her to the Meet. No bucking until mid hunt when we had not been moving a lot. Back into another plough.

She was so tired at the end of the day but I worked her the next. By the end of the week both horses were sane and sensible. When I felt they were going to buck I got after them. Didn't take them long to learn.
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