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post #11 of 29 Old 11-20-2017, 08:01 PM
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Originally Posted by jumpingtothemoon View Post
The BO knows (this a lesson horse), and my coach has told me that it is due to pain.
And you knowing the horse is in pain are OK with continuing to ride the animal?
To take the chance his next swipe at you may not be your helmet connected with and instead be your face.
You appear to be a caring young lady...one who deserves a better mount than what you are being told to ride.

Your barns practices involving their animals care leaves a lousy taste in my mouth...
If the businesses judgement is that bad they continue to use, encourage riding a horse with pain issues and acting out aggressively....putting their clientele at risk of serious injury...
No, just no, it's wrong.
I would be out of their and find a new facility where handling a school horse for lessons was not jeopardizing my safety..
This horse is telling you and that barn the only way it can he hurts...
He is evasive to being haltered because he knows well the next step brings pain to him...
How do you trust a place when they put you at risk? And if you don't think you are at risk you are seriously mistaken...
The next "bite" you might not be so lucky.
If that horse connects with your face and takes half of it off...plastic surgery can only fix just so much..
Yes, this "biting" is that serious!
....
jmo...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #12 of 29 Old 11-20-2017, 08:22 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
And you knowing the horse is in pain are OK with continuing to ride the animal?
To take the chance his next swipe at you may not be your helmet connected with and instead be your face.
You appear to be a caring young lady...one who deserves a better mount than what you are being told to ride.

Your barns practices involving their animals care leaves a lousy taste in my mouth...
If the businesses judgement is that bad they continue to use, encourage riding a horse with pain issues and acting out aggressively....putting their clientele at risk of serious injury...
No, just no, it's wrong.
I would be out of their and find a new facility where handling a school horse for lessons was not jeopardizing my safety..
This horse is telling you and that barn the only way it can he hurts...
He is evasive to being haltered because he knows well the next step brings pain to him...
How do you trust a place when they put you at risk? And if you don't think you are at risk you are seriously mistaken...
The next "bite" you might not be so lucky.
If that horse connects with your face and takes half of it off...plastic surgery can only fix just so much..
Yes, this "biting" is that serious!
....
jmo...
You made some good points there. I guess I never really thought of it THAT way. I just assumed that my barn would never put a horse through unnecessary pain as when they have "off/lame" horses they give them breaks. What's surprising is that he behaves completely fine under-saddle. To me that just doesn't really add up....

I just never grew out of the pony crazy faze
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post #13 of 29 Old 11-20-2017, 09:19 PM
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While I believe in correcting a horse, I do not believe in expecting ahrose to ignore true physical pain, and work regardless.
Address the pain issue first, and do not ride the horse until that has been done.
It sounds like the owner is set on that horse earning a living, regardless of any pain issue.I would really re consider even taking lessons from someone that has an attitude like that!
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post #14 of 29 Old 11-20-2017, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by jumpingtothemoon View Post
You made some good points there. I guess I never really thought of it THAT way. I just assumed that my barn would never put a horse through unnecessary pain as when they have "off/lame" horses they give them breaks. What's surprising is that he behaves completely fine under-saddle. To me that just doesn't really add up....
Guess it does not add up to me either,esp without seeing the horse, far as how he rides, reacts to back pressure, knowing he has been cleared by a vet, far as back pain, or ulcers.
Horses with severe ulcers can be very cinchy.
Only once these issues have been ruled out, can you assume he is acting like a sour lesson horse. The halter thing, sort of leads in that direction, yet at this point, reading what you have posted, just because he rides okay, does not convince me that there is no pain issue
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post #15 of 29 Old 11-20-2017, 09:36 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
While I believe in correcting a horse, I do not believe in expecting ahrose to ignore true physical pain, and work regardless.
Address the pain issue first, and do not ride the horse until that has been done.
It sounds like the owner is set on that horse earning a living, regardless of any pain issue.I would really re consider even taking lessons from someone that has an attitude like that!
I think it will shock you that this barn is an a circuit show barn. As well, the BO does not coach at all, she has other coaches that she hires to do it. Normally the horses receive top care. I think I should also note that he was far less "nippy" in the summer when I rode him once in July.

I just never grew out of the pony crazy faze
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post #16 of 29 Old 11-20-2017, 09:46 PM
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A horse only has so many ways of saying he's sore. Everyone seems to be ignoring this horse. The trainer knows he is in pain but puts him out to be ridden anyway? And lets the learners deal with horse on the ground, knowing it is reacting like this? I agree with Horselovinguy, it leaves a sour taste in the mouth.

I started riding in a riding school. The ponies and horses earned their keep. But if there was a problem they got time off and seen to. They all had a day off each week, sometimes more when things were a bit quiet.

It comes down to personal ethics and this trainer isn't measuring up too well on our limited information. This horse needs a vet assessment. It needs rest. After that depends on what the vet finds.

Biting is never acceptable, it is just too dangerous. A yearling will nip in high spirits as they do when they play with other yearlings, but it has to be (and usually is) discouraged smartly. A horse that has been broken in/ trained for some time that starts biting, does so for a reason. And while that biting has to be disciplined immediately, so should the cause/s be looked for. Increasing and/or prolonged pain is going to get increasing aggression from the horse. They just cant say HELP any clearer.
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post #17 of 29 Old 11-20-2017, 09:54 PM
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Originally Posted by jumpingtothemoon View Post
I think it will shock you that this barn is an a circuit show barn. As well, the BO does not coach at all, she has other coaches that she hires to do it. Normally the horses receive top care. I think I should also note that he was far less "nippy" in the summer when I rode him once in July.
Neither fact mean anything, far as there being no pain issue
I have seen some pretty awful things at some \top show barns'
That summer ride means what? He was not as sore then? Worked less? Worked more regularly by others? No relevance to 'now'
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post #18 of 29 Old 11-21-2017, 12:23 AM
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It is sad that you are expected to just ignore this horse, who is very likely in pain, and you are just expected to dodge him and get on board.

the not bringing his head up to be haltered is him just wanting one more minute to graze, I would guess, and any smart horse will try that.
But, the trying to seriously bite you is more than just being 'naughty'.

I'd be curious to see the saddle fit. But, I doubt you'd have the opportunity to photograph it without calling attention to yourself and your doubts.
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post #19 of 29 Old 11-21-2017, 03:04 AM
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I have a lot of history with such school horses. You should find a new school immediately. This horse is either in pain or has a very serious and dangerous attitude problem. Neither of which you should be dealing with. A riding school which hasn't addressed this situation does not have your best interest at heart and is litteraly risking your life and wellbeing for a profit.

Just a note: people always say that you need to learn how to deal with all sorts of horses. True, but that doesn't extend to dangerous horses. If you are planning a career in dangerous horse rehabilitation, than yes, by all means - go find a reputable trainer and learn those specific skills. You didn't sign up for dangerous horse lessons and you aren't even getting instruction on it, they are leaving you to fend for yourself in a very dangerous situation. Just no.

And another thing, can you bet your life on that horse knowing the difference between a helmet and human flesh? I wouldn't. He was going for you and he was intent on hurting you.

Get out of this situation immediately. And don't trust them with other horses, they have already shown their true colors.
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post #20 of 29 Old 11-21-2017, 09:30 AM
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Unfortunately, we're all pretty limited in our scope of the situation.
I won't be presumptuous, but it sounds like you need to have a chat with your trainer/BO.

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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