Herd bound horse...I知 back... - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 10:06 AM
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I've had first hand experience with a buddy sour barn sour horse. With you're last reply which comes off rude when posters on here gave good advice. So if not good enough advice here, hire Clinton Anderson to fix your buddy sour horse. I'm sure he'd be willing to do the job. He's got all kinds of experience.

Difference is you'll pay for CA training help and big $$$ at that. Advice here is free so be greatful posters are willing to type out long post only to be told not good enough because maybe they have no first hand experience with buddy sour horse's. Am I willing to give my free advice NOPE wont waste my time...you probably won't read it anyway.
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post #12 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalraii View Post
asks for advice...

EDIT: your last response you went on to ask for other peoples experiences but it'll be hard to get decent replies when you have admitted you likely wont be reading them. I do hope you understand how that looks and maybe it isn't meant intentionally - a lot of misunderstandings happen through text unfortunately >.<
If you don't intend to read the responses, it would be useful to put that in your original post so people don't have to waste their time responding. I mean, a lot of people put a lot of time into writing what they did. I read through all of them and there was some really good, consistent advice there.

I don't have this experience so feel free to discount what I'm saying, but based on what you've written, since you've already put this out there, I would say selling him sounds like a good idea. Just make sure the buyer knows he has this issue.
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post #13 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 10:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael1986 View Post
Guys I don稚 have the time to read and reply to all of these super long comments so I am going to post a basic reply to all of them.... I知... here for... just tactful advice.... I would love to hear your experience and how you handled your situation and horse.
I understand about not having the time right now, but we are trying to offer you advice. Offering advice on how to potentially help this very broad situation, especially with someone with less experience, is not going to be summed up in two quick sentences. As Toph said, "there is no different angle, no clever solution, no trickety-trick." With horses, you get what you put in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael1986 View Post
I have come to the realization that it痴 been my lack of discipline and consistency with this horse that has caused this issue.
This is good; this is the very first step.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael1986 View Post
This is something I have never experienced or seen to this level of danger first hand before and if you haven稚 either, I知 not completely sure you can understand how scary it can be.
You have repeatedly stated that his is incredibly "dangerous." If he is as dangerous as you say, then, based on your posts, you should not be working with this horse, especially alone. If you don't know what you are doing, don't expect the horse to know what to do. That sets both of you up to fail.
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"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." - Confucius
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post #14 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 10:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Filou View Post
I think if you feel worried for your safety it's ok to smack him.
Unless the horse is doing something plainly dangerous, simply "feeling worried about [one's] safety" is not enough to warrant smacking the horse.

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Originally Posted by Filou View Post
Then bring him and your other horse together down to the crossties to rest afterward. The next time just bring him down to the cross ties on his own.
I cannot verbally express how potentially dangerous that could be. The added factor that cross ties greatly restrict head and body movement could send an already anxious or nervous horse over the top.

"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." - Confucius
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post #15 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 10:41 AM
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I'm confused about what exactly it is you're trying to fix?


You say you can take him away from your other horse and he's OK - does that mean you can take him away and ride him with no problems?


If the only problem is that he doesn't like being left on his own in the field then you can't fix that - he's just a horse that can't cope with being on his own - basic primitive herd instinct coming out.
For some reason it seems stronger in some than in others.
You can isolate these horses and they seem to go through a shutting down process that allows them to cope but as soon as they're back with another horse or horses they nearly all revert back to being 'clingy'.


If he's otherwise a good horse then its possible (never any guarantees) that he would find a home that's more suitable to his temperament where he either had a companion horse that was always there or, assuming that you only have two horses on the property, a small herd where there was always other horses in the field.


I've always found that horses like this that have to be left alone can be much better left in a stable that's got solid walls and bars at the front (so they can't jump out) than left in a field.
I have three horses that aren't happy to be left on their own but as I have 5 horses they never need to be forced into it.
I have friends with similar horses and they have companion horses for them.
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Just winging it is not a plan
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post #16 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 10:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael1986 View Post
Guys I don稚 have the time to read and reply to all of these super long comments so I am going to post a basic reply to all of them.
You didn't read the replies and then proceed to elaborate on how they are not helpful. Hmmm... Well, good luck to you!
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post #17 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
people don't have to waste their time responding.
No worries - not a waste. I found the responses interesting.
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post #18 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by mmshiro View Post
No worries - not a waste. I found the responses interesting.
Yeah, actually I did too. This has been an informative thread for me. But I feel bad for the people who spent a lot of time responding and then basically got told "thanks but no thanks." Long, considered responses are a thing I LOVE about this forum. If you want your basic "U gotta teach him respect so he duzn't do this" kind of responses, there are places to go to get those.
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post #19 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael1986 View Post
Hey guys, I知 back again to get more advice on my stupid warmblood that is very buddy sour.


What would you do in this situation?

My suggestion is that you find this horse another home with someone who has the patience and knowledge to work with him. Obviously you two are not a match. Poor horse.
This is as direct and honest as I can be.

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, it's because your tactics suck. ~ Marine 1SGT J. Reifinger
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post #20 of 36 Old 05-09-2019, 11:19 AM
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While I do agree with the others that you could have worded things better, I thought I might as well toss my two cents in as well in the off chance you decide to read this.

I am currently also dealing with a buddy sour horse, though she isn't as bad as your guy since I haven't allowed it to progress any further than where she's at now.
What she has been like, is to get all prancy when taken out of the pen and led anywhere else farther off. There were times she'd try to walk or prance past me, especially on the way back. If I was to ride her, she'd back up, turn in sharp circles, canter while only going at the same pace as a fast walk, and so on.

What I have been doing, is working her inside the pasture where she is with her buddies. This way, she's calmer, and is able to focus on me better. This way, I can establish my leadership in a calmer environment. I first started on making sure she listened to any ground work that I asked of her such as back up, leading, flexing, lunging, lowering her head, and so on. Once she was good with this, I tacked her up and worked her with the gear on. Before long, I started to work on riding her in the pen. While she's still throwing her occassional fit, she's improved a great deal as we can walk around calmly now, where is before it was a fight. Her trot is improving as well, but there's still much more that needs to be done and this is with riding her in a halter to get her soft and responsive again.

Between these sessions, I would take her for walks. First they would start off short, but slowly I would lengthen them. And every time she walked calmly next to me, I'd praise her and reward her with pets, or treats to make it as pleasant an experience as possible while away from her buddies. And when she would start to walk past me, I'd do a sharp turn the other direction. After doing this a few times, she's decided it's easier to just walk nicely next to me.

Another thing that really helps when leading them around, that I find, is to talk to them. Tell them your hopes and dreams and positive stuff that makes you happy as they will pick up on your good relaxed mood and it will help them to calm down and feel relaxed with you. With my mare, we are now able to go for calm walks a long ways off from her buddies without her getting worried or doing any prancing, and her riding is coming along as well. It's a long process, but very rewarding in the end.

Hope you manage to find something useful in this and what everyone else has posted as it's all very valuable stuff to know, as everyone here is just trying to help you.
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