Horse pulling back and Barn Freakouts. - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 09:57 AM Thread Starter
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Horse pulling back and Barn Freakouts.

Remember when I said Bee had a freakout on the crossties and fell over last week? I assumed it was because the mini had scared him, however it has been a regular occurrence when he is in the barn. If Chase is there then he is fine and stands normally, however if he is alone he does the same freakout thing. Luckily nothing major has happened yet. He also freaked out when I took Chase from the pasture for a ride, he got his foot caught in the hogwire fence and ripped the entire fence line down.. thats besides the point.

BO thinks that he does it because he thinks he can get away with it because I pull the quick release knot when he begins and let him run into the barn yard. So she thinks we should tie him up and let him freakout until he settles down. Of course if it became dangerous for him we would let him go. Any words of encouragement? I may have to do it in the barn by myself as he hasn't been ridden in a week and he doesn't do well with time off. Wish me luck

Last edited by jaydee; 05-07-2019 at 11:29 AM.
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post #2 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 10:37 AM
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I have done this with horses who develop the habit of pulling back. But, not in crossties.

When I have to, I have a tire inner tube secured and tie the horse to that. I like having some "give" for the horse's head and neck when the set back against the rope.

Although I don't cross tie horses, the lesson learned does carryover to cross ties.

We used to have a member here that talked about tying to the "patience pole." Similar thing.

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post #3 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 10:52 AM
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Sounds more like he is getting buddy sour when he loses sight of his companion...
Only happens in a barn where his visibility of other horses is reduced...


You better know what you are doing if you decide to let Bee battle out the demons on a patience pole...
Once the battle begins you do not put yourself in danger to pull a knot loose...you then are in harms way!
Pick your battle or make the battle unneeded in the first place.
Think about what it is you want to accomplish, then plan ahead so the horse is not left alone at all so "the freak-out" doesn't begin as you will be right there to divert the attention or settle the nervous animal.


Patience poles do work...
I see them used by many a cowboy where I live...
They not only use a "pole", but a livestock trailer, a tree, any suitable strong non-movable object...

But you need to know how to use that "pole" and have the proper tack that is not going to release cause then they learn a new trick...
If the horse is anxious on a cross-tie, use a stall to clean and tack with lead shank over the arm to keep the horse safely listening...
Do not do this by yourself...if this horse flips on a aisle or in a stall...just not go their by yourself.
It can be dangerous for you in your innocence...

...
jmo..
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post #4 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 11:03 AM
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I think there is a difference in approach depending on whether the horse is claustrophobic being tied up, or whether the horse wants to be elsewhere - tied up or not.

The former would be a desensitization exercise. I've done this with an OTTB who (according to BO) "still needs to learn to stand in the cross ties." I took the boy, clipped him in, rubbed him, gave him a carrot, then unclipped him and led him around once. Then I clipped him in again, dawdled around for a while longer loving on him, etc. I have not personally observed him getting nervous in the cross ties ever since.

If the horse really wants to be elsewhere, he'll be at risk of hurting himself to do so, because the crossties aren't the cause for his anxiety, distance is. In that case, you'd address the "distance" problem, and you don't need crossties for that. You don't teach someone not to be afraid of graveyards chaining them to a gravestone for a night.
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post #5 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 11:51 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmshiro View Post
I think there is a difference in approach depending on whether the horse is claustrophobic being tied up, or whether the horse wants to be elsewhere - tied up or not
What bugs me is he’s done this before. He’s been tied to a trailer in the woods, gone to shows, I put him in the crossties every week at the other barn and he was fine.
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post #6 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 11:56 AM
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But he now has a dedicated paddock buddy who he is attached to....
How distracted is he when you ride?
Are you able to keep his attention solely on you and your activity or is he looking around, calling and just unsettled?


Just sounds buddy sour to me...
Unpleasant to deal with but you need to be a firm rider and ask, tell and demand his attention is where it needs to be...on working with you!
...

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post #7 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 12:00 PM
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Right or wrong - when I have one that sets back and freaks out like this, I just get of their way, let them get after it. The only time I rescue is if they fall down and can't get up. BUT. I don't use crossties. Trailer, hitching post, hi line at camp, steel posts to the shed/lean to...

I just calmly move out of the blast zone, let them get to it, and wait until they figure out they're not doing themselves any favors. Then go on with the day like it never happened. If it's just a matter of them wanting loose, they soon figure it out - it doesn't work, so they quit.

The only one I had that this would backfire on was Sarge. He'd throw himself down and couldn't get up... necessitating me cutting the lead rope... or he'd pull hard enough he'd skin his poll, but he'd pop the rope halter off and he knew he could do it. He was hard core buddy soured and low confidence. He'd do this when he couldn't see other horses.
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post #8 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerR View Post
What bugs me is hes done this before. Hes been tied to a trailer in the woods, gone to shows, I put him in the crossties every week at the other barn and he was fine.
So it sounds to me as though it's not the restricted freedom of movement that he worries about, so you could maybe start by confining him in a different, less risky way first - a safer environment for him to throw his tantrum. Like a stall?
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post #9 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 12:37 PM
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I had one learn how to break the lead rope. Once he figured that out - he was loose every show and all the time. That was back when I used just a nylon halter. I use the rope halters now, although I wouldn't use it for a horse that's pulling back and fighting.

Is this one your horse or someone elses?
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post #10 of 119 Old 04-05-2019, 06:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerR View Post
he got his foot caught in the hogwire fence and ripped the entire fence line down.. thats besides the point.
Hi, yes, that's dangerous fencing for horses. Very lucky he didn't hurt himself badly.

Quote:
BO thinks that he does it because he thinks he can get away with it because I pull the quick release knot when he begins and let him run into the barn yard. So she thinks we should tie him up and let him freakout until he settles down. Of course if it became dangerous for him we would let him go.
Yes, while it may not have been the original cause of the freakout, you are training him this behaviour works to get him released! Unfortunately, now you've done so, he will fight harder if it doesn't work. And to plan to let him off 'if it became dangerous'(how do you decide when that is??) you will be reinforcing him for doing THAT!

Very little info here but sounds like the pony is worried about being tied alone in a strange new place? Depends a bit on the degree of fear, etc, but I'd be inclined to work on his confidence separately, and use a long rope with a tie ring, or some such, to *reteach* him not to panic & pull when tied.

Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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