Horse wants to be on top of me during groundwork - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 45 Old 04-25-2016, 12:08 PM
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Smilie - I do not interpret 'just touching me' as a horse being literally on top of me
In every other way, other than the horse not understanding how to move away from the handler, it sounds perfectly calm, biddable and respectful
You're trying to make this horse out to be some wild unmanageable domineering animal and it isn't so you shouldn't suggest treating it like one
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post #42 of 45 Old 04-25-2016, 01:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
Smilie - I do not interpret 'just touching me' as a horse being literally on top of me
In every other way, other than the horse not understanding how to move away from the handler, it sounds perfectly calm, biddable and respectful
You're trying to make this horse out to be some wild unmanageable domineering animal and it isn't so you shouldn't suggest treating it like one
No, not what I am saying at all, but for any horse, it is natural, to move out of the space of a more dominant herd member, and horses do indeed understand that principle. Horses that instead won't yield, have not been taught that respect, often through no fault of their own, but that does not preclude on insisting on it, whether leading or in anything else.
I had broodmares brought in for breeding, touted to 'just love people'
When you led them, they crowded you, not because they were malicious , but simply because they were never taught different.
However, that did not mean I just allowed it, did not insist they not invade my space,or walk either ahead or behind me when led.
We train horses each and every time we ride or handle them, either for the good or the bad. One can get a horse to move various body parts, having them yield to pressure, without any mindless beating or physical force, BUT you do work on getting that yield.
I have started many young horses to lunge, as part of bitting them up, in the latter part of my colt training career. It is natural for them to not move out from you, in one direction or another at first, but it does not take long to have them yield those shoulders, and then drive them forward from behind. Horses understand very well how to learn to give to pressure, as long as we are clear, consistent and fair.
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post #43 of 45 Old 04-28-2016, 11:13 PM
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Nicely said
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post #44 of 45 Old 04-29-2016, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
No, not what I am saying at all, but for any horse, it is natural, to move out of the space of a more dominant herd member, and horses do indeed understand that principle. Horses that instead won't yield, have not been taught that respect, often through no fault of their own, but that does not preclude on insisting on it, whether leading or in anything else.
I had broodmares brought in for breeding, touted to 'just love people'
When you led them, they crowded you, not because they were malicious , but simply because they were never taught different.
However, that did not mean I just allowed it, did not insist they not invade my space,or walk either ahead or behind me when led.
We train horses each and every time we ride or handle them, either for the good or the bad. One can get a horse to move various body parts, having them yield to pressure, without any mindless beating or physical force, BUT you do work on getting that yield.
I have started many young horses to lunge, as part of bitting them up, in the latter part of my colt training career. It is natural for them to not move out from you, in one direction or another at first, but it does not take long to have them yield those shoulders, and then drive them forward from behind. Horses understand very well how to learn to give to pressure, as long as we are clear, consistent and fair.
And that is exactly what she is asking for help with. I see nowhere where she says she doesn't want to do that
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post #45 of 45 Old 05-18-2016, 04:48 AM
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I have this same problem with my mare, but I just started teaching her to lunge. You need to push him out an away from you, you can swing the rope towards his side or use a carrot stick or training stick to keep him off you, and if he comes right in make sure you create some energy on that rope and make him back up. He is not allowed to come into your space like that. and Make sure in your everyday handling and leading that he is keeping himself off of you. He just needs to learn to respect your space. :) Good luck!
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