horse wont walk out of paddock - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 20 Old 12-11-2013, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Lozza19 View Post
I am having trouble getting my horse to walk out of his paddock. He is fine to catch but as soon as we get out of the gate he wont walk any furthuer. he doesnt look scared nor does he move backwards he just wont move forward. Ive tried bribing, circling him, getting behind him. After circling him for 20 mins he usually moves but that cuts into our riding time and i feel like he may start to feel more dominat over me if he gets away with it. Everyday its starting to get longer and longer to get him to move. His past story is that before i bought him he hadnt been ridden in 9 months and he always seemed to be slow walking from the paddock to the barn. Once he is all tacked up he is fine and we usually have a great ride. But if i dont fix this problem his ridding time will be cut into and he might start to think he is the boss in our relationship. Please help!!!!

he is thinking he is boss, and you are confirming that.

you are "asking" him more than enough. TELL him. that means that you must approach this with a very firm attitude of absolute success. you do not go over with a mental state of "maybe I can get him to go", or "I'm going to try this". you have already "tried". now, DO.

I know that sounds odd, but the level of commitment you approach something with will totally affect the outcome, especially with horses.


take a dressage whip and get him to move his feet. it doesn't matter if he circles or moves backward, at first, just get him to see that you mean business and you CAN move his feet. then start walking forward. If he doesn't follow, stay facing the direction you want to go, but reach around with your hand that is not holding the leadline and move the whip or use the whip to put some pressure on his flank (as far back as you can reach without turning completely around). he'll break out of his brace and may move sideways. if he tries to back, hold on the rope, keep moving his feet and when he choose something other than backing up, stop the pressure from the whip and allow him to move freely , even if it's more sideways than forward. Try again: walk forward, if he resists, reach around and put pressure on his flank with your whip or with the long tail end of the leadrope if it's lone enough. when he moves forward, stop the pressure and walk on.
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post #12 of 20 Old 12-11-2013, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
he is thinking he is boss, and you are confirming that.

you are "asking" him more than enough. TELL him. that means that you must approach this with a very firm attitude of absolute success. you do not go over with a mental state of "maybe I can get him to go", or "I'm going to try this". you have already "tried". now, DO.
I agree.

Instead of a dressage whip - a buggy whip or lunge whip will give you more length of arm without having to turn around.

Another option is to tack him at the gate . . .
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post #13 of 20 Old 12-11-2013, 03:31 PM
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yes, the longer it is, the easier it is to reach around and get movement. once you have movement, you can direct it somewhere.

tacking him at the gate? to avoid what? and isn't that just putting off a problem that may grow bigger if not dealt with now? the problem being :
"you lead nicely and go where I tell you to go".
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post #14 of 20 Old 12-11-2013, 03:55 PM
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Agree 110% with Tiny. My long yearling sometimes has hesitance in leading when he sees something scary or uncomforting ahead. I give him a "warning" with a couple tugs on his halter. If he didn't pick up the pace/move out at that point, I reach back with my left arm and pop him with the end of the lead. That's all it takes to gethis butt moving to keep with me. Any future lagging is quickly fixed by just a tug on his halter, he rarely ever needs another pop because he knows what's coming if he refuses again.
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post #15 of 20 Old 12-11-2013, 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
tacking him at the gate? to avoid what? and isn't that just putting off a problem that may grow bigger if not dealt with now? the problem being :
"you lead nicely and go where I tell you to go".
Then he starts the work - at the gate. Instead of a nice grooming session, etc.
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post #16 of 20 Old 12-12-2013, 02:31 AM Thread Starter
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Ok my horse is not scared of the barn, arena, tack up area or anything really. He never shy away. I don't think there is a problem with the way i lead him as my sister who is a very experienced horse woman went down to ride my horse and she spent 20 mins trying to get him to move, eventually getting him to move by a whip. Im thinking of trying join up to determine that I'm boss in our relationship. And for the lady who wanted to know more about the situation my horse has paddock buddies but i dont think this is caused by this because when i do get him to move and get riding the arena is right next to his paddock and he is angel. also he has no medical problems, and he only acts this way trying to get him out of the paddock, he is also fine to catch. I know this is a dominance thing and i need to get it under control but what is the best method? Join up is something i have always wanted to do.
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post #17 of 20 Old 12-12-2013, 03:51 AM
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I think I offered my best idea of how to deal with it. But let us know how your join up goes. Do you have a round pen? And will someone help you.?
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post #18 of 20 Old 12-12-2013, 07:56 AM
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^^ I had to giggle. I could 'hear' the tone in the post. I have used it on my children a time or two....LOL
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post #19 of 20 Old 12-12-2013, 09:01 AM
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Horses need to learn that what you want done is what gets done -- always. There is NEVER a valid reason for a horse to NOT lead. You lead and he goes -- simple of that. Does he have a broken leg or a broken neck? If not, he MUST lead to be a broke horse. Anything less is a 'spoiled' behavior and his refusals will get worse and expand to other areas.

This does not require psychoanalysis and multiple examinations. It is simply a matter of obedience. He has gotten a 'pass' on this behavior which in reality says you are 'training' him to do it.

If you ask a horse to do something that he knows how to do and is physically able to do, this is how it should go:

1) 'Ask' him to do it is clear and concise way.

2) 'Tell' him to do it. In this case a jerk or two on the lead-rope, possibly a 360 to the right and pull forward on the lead-rope firmly.

3) Make him wish he had complied the first time you 'asked'. If you have a second person around, a HARD stroke with a whip or a lead-rope. (Never a threat or a tap. THIS is supposed to be a punishment for not doing what he knows how to do.) DO NOT release pressure until he steps forward. Have a plan before you go out to bring him in. Repeating the same thing over and over and expecting different results is NOT going to happen.

There are other ways to show him the error of his ways. The bottom line is that when you ask for something as simple as leading forward, he must obey and go. [Just think about him burning up in a barn fire because he would only lead when he 'wanted' to instead of when he was told to. Or, think about the nightmare you will have loading him in a trailer when he does not want to load.]

Personally, I prefer a 'lip string'. This is 1/4 inch nylon cord run under a horse's upper lip in a way that you can tighten it (not jerk or pull hard) and release all pressure on it when he steps forward. This will get almost any horse in a trainer or anywhere he can physically go.

As far as 'join up'? This is NOT what Monte Roberts does with join up. He would sell you one of his $60.00 'Dually Halters'. It does the same thing as a lip string. Both are a form of 'war bridle' or 'draw halter'. This means that when they are tightened by the handler (or by the horse), they apply pressure and are uncomfortable. They are not meant to be painful or to be jerked on. Steady light pressure can only be relieved by the horse stepping forward. If the handler lets the horse stand there a minute before asking it to go forward again by tightening the pressure, the horse quickly learns to relieve the pressure itself by stepping forward. It is the simplest and most effective of all training devices.

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post #20 of 20 Old 12-12-2013, 09:40 AM
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Never said your horse was scared of the barn. I was simply giving you an example in my yearlings case as that's the only time he hesitates(by that I mean walking slower, not stopping). He NEVER refuses to move forward by stopping, as he knows for a fact whose boss.

Again, I think what Tiny, Cherie, and I have said would be the best method, as that's what I do. How would a horse get another lower horse to move in the wild? They may give a warning look, or they may go straight to kicking or biting.
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