How do you fix a rearer? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
I have a question to add to this. I hope I'm not hijacking this post, but most of the replies were about a horse that rears when ridden. Does anyone's thought change if it's a horse that rears, occasionally, on the ground? Like if it's afraid or spooks? Would you all still run from such a horse?
Pistol used to rear in hand as well. Some of his issues were from being neglected and abused. Honestly neglected and abused. As in you could put three fingers between his ribs when I got him. He had also been physically abused. As a teen... I guess I was Parelli before Parelli was cool because I attributed all of his behaviors to abuse and refused to correct anything with a harsh response (IN THE BEGINNING). You get smart... eventually... and realize that a correction is not abuse. it's training.

Anyhow... He always reared on the ground but that's because of me not knowing how to fix it.

Riley reared some as a baby. Groundwork and training fixed that. I had to learn how to push him forward form the ground and I had to learn how to keep his legs moving and get him to respect me. But the rearing was actually fixed with basic groundwork. I didn't even have to focus on the rear because it fixed itself...

So, in my opinion, a good solid riding horse that rears on the ground is worth looking at. If it's just a training issue it's worth the work or the money for a trainer. If it's a nasty paw and lunge at me rear, then I may walk away.
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post #22 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 07:03 PM
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A temper pop does not bother me, I do not consider that a rear. A full blown up on the hind legs rear? I don't care how you fix it, as a youth I saw a girl killed when a horse went over backwards on her. I still remember the blood coming out of her ears. If I see a horse that is a confirmed rearer, nope I don't care how you fix it. You want to risk your life on that type of thing, fine, I am not interested.

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post #23 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 07:06 PM
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Horses always rear for a reason. The reasons seem to boil down to:

You're asking the horse to go forward, but they don't want to.
The horse wants to go forward, but you won't let them.
Anxiety.
Habit.

If you can figure out the causes for A, B, or C, you might be able to isolate the problem and work it out.

If it's gone on long enough that it's habit... not so much. That's when they either go out for serious training, or you move them along one way or another, because that's some serious danger right there.
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post #24 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 07:14 PM
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A temper pop does not bother me, I do not consider that a rear. A full blown up on the hind legs rear? I don't care how you fix it, as a youth I saw a girl killed when a horse went over backwards on her. I still remember the blood coming out of her ears. If I see a horse that is a confirmed rearer, nope I don't care how you fix it. You want to risk your life on that type of thing, fine, I am not interested.
Agree with you that there's a significant difference between a little "Noooooo!" rear from a horse and the BIG kind!

My last horse -- who was the type of wonderful one-size-fits-all type with enough go for advanced riders but enough chill to put a tiny child on and turn them loose -- had a day where she was in heat, and it was cold out and she was just in a MOOD. I got on her bareback and she did some tiny "Ugh NO THANKS!" rears when I tried to ride her away from the barn. She was hardly a menace, and she only did it that one day in the three years I had her.

I rode two other really wonderful school horses who would occasionally do a small rear or two as an evasion, but it never got big and I never truly felt like I was in danger.

Conversely, a green pony I was working with last year lost her mind one night, twice in a row, when i mounted her. While she didn't rear, she did scoot backwards, panic, and throw herself on the ground. (I'd been working with her for months, so this was not just her being green.) To me that was much more dangerous than the "rears" from the aforementioned horses, and I stopped riding her shortly after that. I was lucky to walk away with just some scrapes.
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post #25 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 07:35 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by waresbear View Post
A temper pop does not bother me, I do not consider that a rear. A full blown up on the hind legs rear? I don't care how you fix it, as a youth I saw a girl killed when a horse went over backwards on her. I still remember the blood coming out of her ears. If I see a horse that is a confirmed rearer, nope I don't care how you fix it. You want to risk your life on that type of thing, fine, I am not interested.
I couldn't like this. That is so terribly sad and traumatic. It seems that most of the horse related human deaths I've heard of have happened because of a horse going over backwards. I'm so sorry for that girl and her family, and for you having to carry that memory.

How many of you think that things like saddle fit can cause behavioral problems such as rearing? My mare is very hard to fit. She is high withered and has those pockets on either side of her withers that saddles tend to dig into, causing the shoulder to grind/hit against it while the horse is moving. My mare also had a general habit of just being an ornery PITA, and rather unpredictable honestly, despite a lot of consistent good handling and training. After I finally figured out that I had a saddle fit problem (it took a few years because it was so subtle. Lots of qualified horse people checked my saddle and never saw a problem) and found a way to fix the saddle problem, she turned into a different horse. Like night and day. All of a sudden she would move out, she stopped freaking out, stopped being ornery, stopped all bad behaviors like infrequently popping up/rear or bucking or balking or what have you. Now she is a horse that I have little to no qualms about putting mildly experienced people on. In fact, she has become so mellow and trustworthy that I am planning on her being my daughter's first mount in a few years when my mare will be about 18 years old and my daughter about 4.

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post #26 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 07:59 PM
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How many of you think that things like saddle fit can cause behavioral problems such as rearing?
Definitely. And if I knew it was just the saddle, I would have no qualms about putting an inexperienced rider on a horse that had reared before. The most straight up I ever went on a horse was on a TB I put on a saddle on that didn't fit. When I sat down, he went straight up, almost to the point of going over. Once I pulled the saddle off he was fine, and I put another saddle on that fit him, went for a ride, and as far as I know that was the only time that horse ever reared in his life. He was a beginner's horse before and after that.

If a saddle pinches just right it can stimulate a rear.

With a habitual rearer, I would wonder at those who say to sell the horse. Who are you selling the horse to? I would consider it unethical to sell the horse to anyone other than a remedial horse trainer that had full disclosure of the horse's issues.
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post #27 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 08:10 PM
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I have to say, the worst rearer I had ever seen was cured with a good crack between the ears with a pipe. This horse had seriously injured a lot of people, and had learned that rearing and flipping over would absolutely get it out of work. I don't know how no one had shot it already. My father was about the only nut around that would dare get on something like that, and he loved it. What a fearless man. This was a do or die situation though, a last resort, his thoughts were "if it kills it, oh well, if it lives, he better learn." It was bound for coyote bait anyway.

I was around 14, one of the last real nasty rank sobs he ever rode. He closed the gate, grabbed the pipe and hopped on, ready. As soon as that horse let out that squeal and lifted his feet, he swung. Knocked him out cold. He stayed on, waited a moment, the horse got back up, shook, and walked off nicely. That man got off, gave him a pat and let him back out to pasture. I swear to god, from that day on ANYONE could ride that horse. He wouldn't lift a foot off the ground. When he was fully trained he was a dream to ride, a fancy mover with a lot of forward motion. I rode him for a bit, before I had my accident on a different horse. That day saved that horses life.

So I do believe that it is completely different for individual horses, and it takes an extremely experienced horseman to know what method to use, how severe a method to use, or just not get on at all.

Personally, I would never get on one. I'd probably send it off to slaughter to be completely honest. A true rearer is not something I want to deal with, and not something I would trust in anyone else's hands, especially in my area. There are very, very few experienced horsemen left here.

But for small rears and little pops, life a fresh horse or a horse refusing to, say - cross a creek- I disengage the front end, and swing that rear end around. If I have to I will grab a rein and pull that nose around.
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post #28 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 08:24 PM Thread Starter
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With a habitual rearer, I would wonder at those who say to sell the horse. Who are you selling the horse to? I would consider it unethical to sell the horse to anyone other than a remedial horse trainer that had full disclosure of the horse's issues.
Excellent point. In some circles of the horse world, rearing seems almost common place to the point that it's not even a vice. I'm thinking of amateur barrel racing here. We've got some great barrel racers here on HF that are very good horse people and now how to train their horse for barrel racing without making their horse a nut (there is nothing more impressive to me than a competitive barrel horse that walks calmly into the arena before the cue from their rider to take off to the barrels). But for a lot of local gymkhanas I've seen and more amateur barrel racers ... those horses tend to not be so lucky in their training and handling. I have seen young nine and ten year old girls riding horses that toss their heads and pop up in the front down the alley before letting loose in the arena while the little girls yank them around the barrels, and the onlookers commented about what good riders they are. Well, that is not good riding to me, and it got to the point where I just couldn't watch it anymore and so stopped going to the gymkhanas.

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post #29 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 09:03 PM
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Excellent point. In some circles of the horse world, rearing seems almost common place to the point that it's not even a vice. I'm thinking of amateur barrel racing here. We've got some great barrel racers here on HF that are very good horse people and now how to train their horse for barrel racing without making their horse a nut (there is nothing more impressive to me than a competitive barrel horse that walks calmly into the arena before the cue from their rider to take off to the barrels). But for a lot of local gymkhanas I've seen and more amateur barrel racers ... those horses tend to not be so lucky in their training and handling. I have seen young nine and ten year old girls riding horses that toss their heads and pop up in the front down the alley before letting loose in the arena while the little girls yank them around the barrels, and the onlookers commented about what good riders they are. Well, that is not good riding to me, and it got to the point where I just couldn't watch it anymore and so stopped going to the gymkhanas.
And that is precisely why I would send a true rearer to slaughter directly, or put it down. Those are the kinds of people where I would absolutely hate to see a true, dangerous, habitual rearer fall into their hands.
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post #30 of 48 Old 10-27-2018, 09:42 PM
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Has anyone heard of, or tried, the advice I heard, that of hitting the horse on his belly, when he comes up?
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