Lunging - The Horse Forum
 9Likes
  • 3 Post By blue eyed pony
  • 4 Post By Eneone
  • 1 Post By tinyliny
  • 1 Post By loosie
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 6 Old 09-24-2020, 08:37 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 4
• Horses: 0
Lunging

I have a four year old that has started to buck when I move him into a trot on the lunge line. Should I try to correct the behavior or make him continue? If so how?
Landline is offline  
post #2 of 6 Old 09-24-2020, 08:45 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,227
• Horses: 5
I have a system with horses that play up on the lunge line.

You want to play around? Clearly you're not working hard enough. Work harder. Oh I'm sorry (not really), you don't WANT to work harder? Too bad. This can be faster (ie asking for a canter if they want to buck when you ask for trot) or it can be a tighter circle. Tight circles are HARD.
You want to trot nicely like I asked? Cool, you can keep doing that, and once you've done it for a short while, you can stop.

It got my hottest horse to stop bolting around me at top speed and start trotting with a lovely stretch as featured in my profile pic. She still has a bit of a buck around in canter when she's fresh, but she always settles fast.

Edit: do this with a proper lunge cavesson and a good pair of GLOVES so you have the leverage to keep control of the horse, because otherwise, some of them will just flip you the bird and have a fine old time exploring your arena without you.

Edit 2: rule out pain, as well, though this is usually less of an issue on the lunge than it is under saddle

MAKORA THOROUGHBRED SPORTHORSES
blue eyed pony is offline  
post #3 of 6 Old 09-24-2020, 01:21 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 2
• Horses: 0
Have you considered why he bucks? Horses that buck on the lunge line usually do so in high-spirits or in protest.

I usually give one "free" high-spirits buck, especially to young horses. I am not on them nor am I near them, so I do not really care. After that, however, it is time to work; any more bucking will result in discipline. If your horse has excess energy, evaluate his feed and turnout schedule. It is not uncommon for horses to be made hot by feeding them high-octane feed and limiting turnout.

For protesting bucks, "it depends." Protesting bucks are usually done in protest of human error, such as giving a too aggressive cue, giving poor release, lunging in too small of a circle, or lunging for too long.
Your cue must be in the correct proportion to his needs. For example, some horses are so sensitive that they will increase their speed just from a raise in your energy level; and if you use a whip as a cue instead, they may feel that is too aggressive and buck in protest.
When you ask for an increase in speed, you must release the pressure the moment he complies. Any continuation of pressure nags and confuses the horse, which could lead to bucking.
Lunging is already hard work and lunging in smaller circles and of longer durations only increase the difficulty. If your lunging circle is of good size, he may be bored. How often are you lunging? How long are you lunging? Horses do not understand the concepts of "exercise" and "training". Do not confuse "consistency is key" as "no variations." Vary what you ask of him and where.

Why are you lunging? There are many four-years-old that can be safely started under-saddle.
Eneone is offline  
post #4 of 6 Old 09-24-2020, 01:52 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Maryland
Posts: 9
• Horses: 0
Make him work harder. If he wants to buck, tighter circle or move him up a gait. Do transitions. If he absolutely refuses to listen to you, let him work himself out and then do what you had planned. If he doesn't improve after a week or so I'd have a vet out to look at him and make sure there's nothing causing him pain or discomfort.
Bailey Mcfall is offline  
post #5 of 6 Old 09-24-2020, 06:39 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 48,449
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eneone View Post
Have you considered why he bucks? Horses that buck on the lunge line usually do so in high-spirits or in protest.

I usually give one "free" high-spirits buck, especially to young horses. I am not on them nor am I near them, so I do not really care. After that, however, it is time to work; any more bucking will result in discipline. If your horse has excess energy, evaluate his feed and turnout schedule. It is not uncommon for horses to be made hot by feeding them high-octane feed and limiting turnout.

For protesting bucks, "it depends." Protesting bucks are usually done in protest of human error, such as giving a too aggressive cue, giving poor release, lunging in too small of a circle, or lunging for too long.
Your cue must be in the correct proportion to his needs. For example, some horses are so sensitive that they will increase their speed just from a raise in your energy level; and if you use a whip as a cue instead, they may feel that is too aggressive and buck in protest.
When you ask for an increase in speed, you must release the pressure the moment he complies. Any continuation of pressure nags and confuses the horse, which could lead to bucking.
Lunging is already hard work and lunging in smaller circles and of longer durations only increase the difficulty. If your lunging circle is of good size, he may be bored. How often are you lunging? How long are you lunging? Horses do not understand the concepts of "exercise" and "training". Do not confuse "consistency is key" as "no variations." Vary what you ask of him and where.

Why are you lunging? There are many four-years-old that can be safely started under-saddle.



I agree with EVERY word here~! Especially about the human error, and the need to have your 'ask' be enough, but not too much.
loosie likes this.
tinyliny is offline  
post #6 of 6 Old 09-24-2020, 09:00 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 22,624
• Horses: 0
I too agree with Eneone very much.

What is his management situation? Why are you lunging him? How much training has he had? How much lunging has he done? How does he behave elsewhere for you? How experienced a trainer are you? Has he been checked out physically, to rule out pain issues? How big of a circle are you on when asking for faster? And what do you do when he bucks? All very relevant questions IMO.
JoBlueQuarter likes this.
loosie is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome