New aggressive gelding - Page 11 - The Horse Forum
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post #101 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 04:20 PM
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Maybe I'm crazy, but since this young gelding sounds very comfortable with humans, I wonder if he is displaying "dominance play" with humans rather than horses. It wouldn't make it any less dangerous, but I wonder if his intentions aren't as malicious as it might seem.
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post #102 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 04:23 PM
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Sorry, I wanted to clarify what I just posted, but I ran out of edit time. What I am getting at, is, if this were a really mean aggressive horse who wanted to hurt people, wouldnít he have charged from the minute he saw OP in his pasture? Instead, it sounds like something triggered him when he got closer. It seems that the trigger had to be something he could only see / smell / hear / whatever from a close distance. Knowing that, could it be possible to deduce what the trigger was and then work on fixing that?
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post #103 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 04:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3Horses2DogsandaCat View Post
Maybe I'm crazy, but since this young gelding sounds very comfortable with humans, I wonder if he is displaying "dominance play" with humans rather than horses. It wouldn't make it any less dangerous, but I wonder if his intentions aren't as malicious as it might seem.

This is why I wonder how he does in a 'herd' setting with a larger group. I'm curious if he's obnoxious with other horses. It's possible he's never been in a larger group wherein some bigger, badder 'alpha' mare or gelding thrashed his arsh for his nonsense and taught him basic manners.

"We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us."
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post #104 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by AtokaGhosthorse View Post
This is why I wonder how he does in a 'herd' setting with a larger group. I'm curious if he's obnoxious with other horses. It's possible he's never been in a larger group wherein some bigger, badder 'alpha' mare or gelding thrashed his arsh for his nonsense and taught him basic manners.
*cough*

Quote:
Originally Posted by mulehugger View Post
He's in with a 17 year old gelded draft mule, a 5 year old Molly mule, and a 17 year old quarter horse. I've never seen him bother any of them, he seems to mind his own business and definitely prefers the company of people to horses.
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Originally Posted by mulehugger View Post
Yes, he seems to know exactly how to behave in a herd, and he's not even at the top of the totem pole in his pasture.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mulehugger View Post
He's definitely not top of the totem pole, but I wouldn't say he's the bottom either. The 17 year old quarter horse is probably at the bottom, but I've never seen him pushed around by any of them. He just can't be bothered with politics.
If what @mulehugger says/interprets is true....

-

I don't know.... I really don't....
I think @ACinATX , @Foxhunter , and a few others have a point. A horse attacking (truly) completely unprovoked "for no reason" is extremely rare and goes against everything I've learned about horses....
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post #105 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 04:52 PM
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I missed that response. So. He's not harassing the other equines, at least that anyone knows of at this time.


IDK. I just keep running this one over and over in my mind trying to figure it out. Sure there's mean horses out there - I just like trying to puzzle out the why: Nurture (Someone taught them) or Nature (Born crazy as a run over dog).
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post #106 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 05:05 PM
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I don't know.... I really don't.... I am totally stumped....

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@cobra
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Originally Posted by cobra View Post
It's is strange the change in attitude and behavior. When was this ride? How long had you had him at this time? When did you get him? If this is all happening within the span of a month or so, i would even suggest he was possibly drugged before the sale. Some last about a month. The only other thing that strikes me, is it seems most of the issues started after you moved him to the barn he is at now. Is there any possibility something is going on at this barn that could be affecting him? Whether from staff working there, or another boarder.
made a few good points. I guess he could have been drugged...? I don't know....

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*cough*
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Originally Posted by α CMa View Post
If what you say is true [yielding and/or ignoring the other equines], then I believe, as it sounds, his behavior has to do more with his association with humans - for some reason.

If he doesn't go over to them and "randomly", "all of a sudden", "for no reason" hauls off and bite them, then he does know how to behave.
Quote:
Originally Posted by α CMa View Post
He did know how to behave at one point.
.
To completely 180 from a sweet, people-friendly gelding to a haul-off on someone "randomly", "no warning", "unprovoked", "for no reason"
just....????
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post #107 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 05:07 PM
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Maybe plan and simple, he is neurological. So no amount of beating the tar out of him, or how many times he is taken back to the beginning, he canít change because he just is not right in the head.

Humans donít own the market when it comes to being born with neurological issues, or even developing them in life.

And these type of neurological issues canít be cured with training, kindness, CTJ meeting, rainbows, butterflyís and sprinkle dust.

Happy content horses donít just attack. Put him out of his misery and humanely send him over the bridge.

I am dealing with such issues and there is a very high chance he is not helpable.
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post #108 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 05:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3Horses2DogsandaCat View Post
Maybe I'm crazy, but since this young gelding sounds very comfortable with humans, I wonder if he is displaying "dominance play" with humans rather than horses. It wouldn't make it any less dangerous, but I wonder if his intentions aren't as malicious as it might seem.
I think there's a good chance you're right. Mind you, I'd class serious 'dominance aggression' as more 'malicious' than say, defensive aggression/something that he's learned to do as a reaction. And it is the horse that is fighting for 'dominance' that is, IMO, the more likely to just fight harder if you fight back, as they take it as a challenge.

Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #109 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 06:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
Sorry, I wanted to clarify what I just posted, but I ran out of edit time. What I am getting at, is, if this were a really mean aggressive horse who wanted to hurt people, wouldn’t he have charged from the minute he saw OP in his pasture? Instead, it sounds like something triggered him when he got closer. It seems that the trigger had to be something he could only see / smell / hear / whatever from a close distance. Knowing that, could it be possible to deduce what the trigger was and then work on fixing that?
Before i say this, i want to be perfectly clear that in no way am I trying to "blame" the OP. Also, in no way am I trying to excuse what the horse did. It should not be tolerated, ever, from a horse or any other animal.

That said, I think perhaps when the horse got close something he saw in body language, energy, etc from the OP affected him. Whether it was sensing hesitance, fear, anger, etc. Horses are individuals, and some are way more sensitive to the energy and emotion/tension that people are feeling.

For example, my Arabian gelding is generally calm and easygoing... However, if my emotions are high, whether excited, tense, scared, etc he senses it in a second and responds much differently. If I approach him with a more agressive or fearful mindset he responds very badly.

Again, not blaming OP, simply suggesting that any fear or hesitance or what have you may have contributed to his reaction when he got closer. I would most definitely seek out an experienced horse trainer to work with him, or to sell him to. Just my opinion....
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post #110 of 224 Old 01-07-2019, 07:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
And it is the horse that is fighting for 'dominance' that is, IMO, the more likely to just fight harder if you fight back, as they take it as a challenge.

Good point- I didn't think about that when I made my statement.
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