The new pasture is nearly ready - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 11Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 21 Old 09-13-2017, 11:17 AM
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Olds Alberta Canada
Posts: 12,041
• Horses: 0
If you are afraid the horse will trow a tantrum, when not allowed to stop and graze, I fear you are nowhere near ready to lead him out of his comfort zone!
Smilie is offline  
post #12 of 21 Old 09-13-2017, 11:43 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 1
• Horses: 0
I just bought a new mare, she is 19 and supposedly was the "perfect" rider. She did excellent the arena, but once I got her home and with my other others (1 Mare, 1 Gelding) she has acted up horrible. She won't listen, she dances when I try to mount her, she won't stop for me when riding in the field across from the barn; she wants to go back to the barn. I've since separated her from the Gelding, as I thought that might be the issue. Now when I get on her, she constantly throws her head. I've had her 3 weeks now. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated at this time! I'm totally frustrated right now.
Vegas1123 is offline  
post #13 of 21 Old 09-13-2017, 03:23 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Palmyra, Wisconsin
Posts: 6,161
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegas1123 View Post
I just bought a new mare, she is 19 and supposedly was the "perfect" rider. She did excellent the arena, but once I got her home and with my other others (1 Mare, 1 Gelding) she has acted up horrible. She won't listen, she dances when I try to mount her, she won't stop for me when riding in the field across from the barn; she wants to go back to the barn. I've since separated her from the Gelding, as I thought that might be the issue. Now when I get on her, she constantly throws her head. I've had her 3 weeks now. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated at this time! I'm totally frustrated right now.
You might get better feedback by starting another thread with your questions/concerns. More people will see it. Good luck.
natisha is offline  
post #14 of 21 Old 09-13-2017, 04:38 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Texas
Posts: 590
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
If you are afraid the horse will trow a tantrum, when not allowed to stop and graze, I fear you are nowhere near ready to lead him out of his comfort zone!
smilie,
This has never happened before, it is a worry. I am a worrier, its because I do my best to look ahead at possible problems that may occur, and I am trying to find the best ways to prepare for them. This is two weeks away from happening. I am looking for ideas, games, things like that to prepare for moving him. I figured this would be a great place because there are lots of people and lots of great minds out there that would have good ideas to prepare and maybe include things that I didnt think of. This comment is unhelpful.

But thanks for the lesson, next time instead of asking this forum for ideas I will just think of them myself.

Thank you everyone else for your advise.

The best teacher is always the horse.
EstrellaandJericho is offline  
post #15 of 21 Old 09-13-2017, 04:43 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: middle of nowhere
Posts: 3,014
• Horses: 3
Put the halter on, bump back on the rope a few times if the horse needs a reminder that you're in charge, and go where you want to go. You're making a lot bigger deal out this than it is. Make sure you're doing the leading, not him. Don't let his nose get ahead of your shoulder, and don't walk looking at him. Just look straight ahead and walk.

If you're worried, have someone else do it, and then watch a bunch of videos and work with groundwork and leading in a round pen or pasture until you're confident with it. Walk him over feed bags and logs. Send him between you and a safe fence. Teach him to disengage and move off when asked. Let him make mistakes, then correct them.

Lots of good videos to watch here: https://www.google.com/search?q=yout...utf-8&oe=utf-8

If you're worried he'll spook, he probably will. If you're not paying attention and he stops to eat grass, that's your fault. Pop up on the rope and keep moving. If you go into it with the mindset of 'oh dear, I have to go walk my horse over to our new place and I'm worried something will happen' you're setting yourself up for failure. If you mentally go "OK, time to go get my horse and show him his new digs. This will be great!" then it will be.
greentree likes this.
SilverMaple is offline  
post #16 of 21 Old 09-13-2017, 05:02 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Texas
Posts: 590
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverMaple View Post
Put the halter on, bump back on the rope a few times if the horse needs a reminder that you're in charge, and go where you want to go. You're making a lot bigger deal out this than it is. Make sure you're doing the leading, not him. Don't let his nose get ahead of your shoulder, and don't walk looking at him. Just look straight ahead and walk.

If you're worried, have someone else do it, and then watch a bunch of videos and work with groundwork and leading in a round pen or pasture until you're confident with it. Walk him over feed bags and logs. Send him between you and a safe fence. Teach him to disengage and move off when asked. Let him make mistakes, then correct them.

Lots of good videos to watch here: https://www.google.com/search?q=yout...utf-8&oe=utf-8

If you're worried he'll spook, he probably will. If you're not paying attention and he stops to eat grass, that's your fault. Pop up on the rope and keep moving. If you go into it with the mindset of 'oh dear, I have to go walk my horse over to our new place and I'm worried something will happen' you're setting yourself up for failure. If you mentally go "OK, time to go get my horse and show him his new digs. This will be great!" then it will be.
you are right i am making a bigger deal than it is.

I will watch the videos later tonight but im off to lead him around and bring him around other places.

Sorry for asking a stupid question.

The best teacher is always the horse.
EstrellaandJericho is offline  
post #17 of 21 Old 09-13-2017, 10:08 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: middle of nowhere
Posts: 3,014
• Horses: 3
It's not a stupid question, but you're like me-- you worry about things before they happen, and that can bring them to fruition. I've really had to work with my brain to not worry so much. Realizing what could go wrong is valuable around horses-- but dwelling on it isn't good for anyone. Realize what might go wrong, but work to prevent it from happening and enjoy your horse
walkinthewalk likes this.
SilverMaple is offline  
post #18 of 21 Old 09-13-2017, 10:47 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Cambridge, MN
Posts: 888
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
I'd say a good pair of gloves are a must.
You have a lot of good advice. Let me just talk about being safe, because as a professional coward I like not to take chances, and I don't like seeing people get hurt with horses.
  1. Wear gloves so if the horse jerks the rope you don't peel the skin off your hands
  2. Wear boots so if the horse spooks and tries to land on you it doesn't peel the skin off your ankles
  3. NEVER put your hand inside the coil of a lead rope. If the horse takes off that coil can turn into a timber hitch and you could lose a thumb, lose a hand, be dragged, etc. This is like making sure you never put your finger inside the trigger guard of a firearm until you are ready to shoot. It take practice because it's easy to do it wrong without thinking. Practice this every time you lead.
  4. If a horse tries to take off while you are leading it, step out to the side and pull it around. Even a small person can redirect a horse from the side, but even a small horse can drag a large person going directly away. Keep the horse going in a circle until it settles down.
I don't mean to give you more to worry about. I do think you should be very confident when you move him, and if that takes some more practice in the pasture, be sure and spend the time to get there. Good luck.
walkinthewalk likes this.
Joel Reiter is offline  
post #19 of 21 Old 09-13-2017, 11:03 PM
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Olds Alberta Canada
Posts: 12,041
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by EstrellaandJericho View Post
smilie,
This has never happened before, it is a worry. I am a worrier, its because I do my best to look ahead at possible problems that may occur, and I am trying to find the best ways to prepare for them. This is two weeks away from happening. I am looking for ideas, games, things like that to prepare for moving him. I figured this would be a great place because there are lots of people and lots of great minds out there that would have good ideas to prepare and maybe include things that I didnt think of. This comment is unhelpful.

But thanks for the lesson, next time instead of asking this forum for ideas I will just think of them myself.

Thank you everyone else for your advise.
Sorry you took my comment the wrong way, as I was trying to say you have some homework to do, BEFORE leading him out of his comfort zone.
This horse has pulled away while being lunged-correct?
Therefore, I would make sure, in his comfort zone, before you lead him outside of it, you get both of you familiar with equipment that will help you keep control in the worst case scenario
For me, that would be introduction to a stud shank run under the chin. Others might prefer a Be Nice Halter. You might not need to use the effect/advantage of either, but just like brakes, are nice to have, just in case.
What will happen if he does spook, throw a tantrum, and pull away again, or even perhaps run over you?
At best, only some more negative training, at the worst, a wreak!
I don;t ride a horse out by himself, until he is riding 100% at home, nor do I take him to shows, until he is ready for that, having the 'ingrained control
I have taken young horses to the booth at Spruce Meadows. These are horses I always lead around home, at shows, ect, with just a plain lead shank
However, leaving on Thursday night, walking the horse to the distant parking lot, with fireworks going off, on top of everything else, walking between parked cars I rather not dent, I lead that horse with a stud shank
That was my point-be prepared to handle any worst case scenarios, versus agonizing if they might happen!
Smilie is offline  
post #20 of 21 Old 09-14-2017, 11:25 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 5,693
• Horses: 12
If you know you are a worrier despite having prepared then do some work on you as well. Breathing exercises are helpful and can center you. Making breathing to stay centered a habit then you can control your response. Combining that with positive visualizations can put you in the best frame of mind to do whatever task is at hand. You are preparing, you know what he has done, don't borrow trouble so to speak by putting front and center every negative happening that is possible. Don't give him the opportunity or allow him to expect that he can do certain things that worry you when working with him. There are several threads that talk about horses that try to graze while being led. Don't let the habit start until you are comfortable you are in control and then and only then do you pick an appropriate location and command that he won't confuse and allow him to graze or not. Some people will only allow grazing off lead in a safe enclosed space. For now don't give him the option or opportunity. When he is settled at your place if you decide it is something you want to be able to do with him make it an option with a specific command and location and not an opportunity just because the grass presents itself.

To share an example, while I was up north and looking for work I went to a large breeding/show barn to apply for a job as a stable hand. Part of the "interview" was to ask you to go get a specific horse out of his stall and bring him to the grooming area. If you showed up in a timely manner then the job was yours. What they didn't tell you was that this horse was an absolute pill. He seemingly channeled every negative thought you had in your head. If you were fidgety and nervous - he was fidgety and nervous. You envisioned a horse charging at you at the stall door - he complied. No problems getting on a halter but you had thoughts of a horse rearing while walking - up he went. You feared a horse bolting - down the aisle he bolted. If being crowed scared you then he was all up in your space. If you had visions of haltering him, leading him out and him walking sedately next to you then that was what happened. Similarly if you had that expectation and acted accordingly that is what happened. He should have been called Telegraph instead of Ambassador. Accomplishing the task told them you were positive thinking, confident and had basic skills. It also got you the job.

He is a large horse correct? You may need to give him more time being comfortable bending, learning balance lunging on a circle, and make sure his lead is at minimum equivalent to a 20M circle which means a 30 foot or slightly longer line for cantering. You also don't want slack in your line. You want to be able to use intermittent pressure to keep his neck flexed and head tipped to the center of the circle. That should keep him from running through the circle.
QtrBel is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Getting pasture ready for a horse (eventually) BookWorm Barn Maintenance 6 01-09-2013 05:05 PM
Are we doing good so far? Opinions on when she's ready to ride in the big pasture LovesMyDunnBoy Horse Training 11 05-28-2012 11:30 PM
New Pasture & New Pasture Buddies! RoCru Horse Pictures 10 11-23-2010 04:08 AM
HELP! WEEDY pasture! (or Pasture Management ?) devildogtigress Horse Nutrition 9 10-30-2010 11:05 PM
New Pasture...and pasture-mates! RoCru Horse Pictures 14 10-27-2009 04:51 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome