Opinions on using roundpin consistently? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 03-08-2020, 11:27 AM Thread Starter
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Opinions on using roundpin consistently?

Recently we brought a sweet little arab mare into our barn family, she was sold as green broke but sustained an injury to her knee while settling in and needed a few months at rest before returning to work under saddle. Just last week my wonderful trainer started working with her, very experienced and knowledgeable woman to say the least. I noticed that the first thing she did was put her in our 70’ round pen, saddled her up and lunged her w/t/c in both directions for about 20 minutes. I've never utilized the roundpin before, I've only lunged on a line w/t but not often did I ask for a canter. She reccomend for me to continue roundpenning her consistently for a couple weeks. I am not questioning her knowledge as a trainer. I am just curious if consistent work on the small circle may be physically stressing her joints/soft tissues. I've seen quite a few people use the roundpin this way with no issues, but I would rather ask a dumb question than jeopardize my girls soundness. Thank you guys for any insight. 🙂
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post #2 of 9 Old 03-08-2020, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Idyllic_equine View Post
Recently we brought a sweet little arab mare into our barn family, she was sold as green broke but sustained an injury to her knee while settling in and needed a few months at rest before returning to work under saddle. Just last week my wonderful trainer started working with her, very experienced and knowledgeable woman to say the least. I noticed that the first thing she did was put her in our 70í round pen, saddled her up and lunged her w/t/c in both directions for about 20 minutes. I've never utilized the roundpin before, I've only lunged on a line w/t but not often did I ask for a canter. She reccomend for me to continue roundpenning her consistently for a couple weeks. I am not questioning her knowledge as a trainer. I am just curious if consistent work on the small circle may be physically stressing her joints/soft tissues. I've seen quite a few people use the roundpin this way with no issues, but I would rather ask a dumb question than jeopardize my girls soundness. Thank you guys for any insight. 🙂
This kind of exercise will get a horse very fit, but not the rider. A horse's soundness should be checked BEFORE any work is done. Has this horse been cleared by the vet to be worked?

If you do choose to work the horse this way, would stick to walk and trot only until the horse offers to canter. Of course, being an Arabian, she may want to go fast, too soon.


I would be cautious of getting any Arabian super fit by lunging/round pen work. She may be roaring to go once mounted. This type of thing is done to condition a quieter breed, like QH so they can handle longer rides.
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post #3 of 9 Old 03-08-2020, 01:03 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idyllic_equine View Post
Recently we brought a sweet little arab mare into our barn family, she was sold as green broke but sustained an injury to her knee while settling in and needed a few months at rest before returning to work under saddle. Just last week my wonderful trainer started working with her, very experienced and knowledgeable woman to say the least. I noticed that the first thing she did was put her in our 70’ round pen, saddled her up and lunged her w/t/c in both directions for about 20 minutes. I've never utilized the roundpin before, I've only lunged on a line w/t but not often did I ask for a canter. She reccomend for me to continue roundpenning her consistently for a couple weeks. I am not questioning her knowledge as a trainer. I am just curious if consistent work on the small circle may be physically stressing her joints/soft tissues. I've seen quite a few people use the roundpin this way with no issues, but I would rather ask a dumb question than jeopardize my girls soundness. Thank you guys for any insight. 🙂
This kind of exercise will get a horse very fit, but not the rider. A horse's soundness should be checked BEFORE any work is done. Has this horse been cleared by the vet to be worked?

If you do choose to work the horse this way, would stick to walk and trot only until the horse offers to canter. Of course, being an Arabian, she may want to go fast, too soon.


I would be cautious of getting any Arabian super fit by lunging/round pen work. She may be roaring to go once mounted. This type of thing is done to condition a quieter breed, like QH so they can handle longer rides.
Yes, she was cleared last month for her re-evaluation of that knee to start full work. She got a little rushy in the canter at first, but calmed down nicely. I believe my trainer was asking her to pick up the canter, not allowing her to canter unless she was asked.
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post #4 of 9 Old Yesterday, 04:35 AM
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Hi,

Yes, lots of circles, whether loose in a pen or lunging, esp if fast, is hard on the joints. But assuming you build up to it gradually, circles are big enough, walk & trot, then eventually a little cantering will probably be fine. This will get the horse fitter physically. Won't do a lot for her mentally/training-wise, so I wonder, *why* do you want to run her in circles? If not for fitness, while I use 'lunging' as a (small) part of training, I wouldn't overdo it - 5 mins here & there maybe, to teach/confirm her responding to you at a distance.
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post #5 of 9 Old Yesterday, 10:14 PM
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I'm not a fan of lunging as said it's hard on joints. Doing 5 or 10 minutes of trotting an walking is ok.

Every day for 20 minutes not so much. That said I lunged my boy today before riding ,he's been way to full of himself. So I did some lunging lots of direction changes and trotting.

Worked him on lunge line till his head came down an was relaxed and no more leaping in the air ,bucking when asked to change directions. Took 10 minutes for him to relax and work like he should,with no leaping and bucking.

I probably won't need to lunge him again now he's in steady work. He's young and I like to keep lunging to a once in a while deal.
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post #6 of 9 Old Yesterday, 10:23 PM
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I would say just to be wary and always keep an eye out. Moving in a circle is actually quite difficult for a horse - imagine trying to maintain balance while running slanted to one side. It's difficult, and it's one reason straightness in dressage is such a huge deal. I wouldn't say it'll necessarily harm her, but I'd definitely keep an eye on her and make sure you're not pushing her too hard too soon. I like to lunge mine only for 15-20 minutes at most, if they're fresh or need a tune up. Any longer, and it's just repetitive and hard on them. Horses aren't designed to be constantly running in circles.

"The art of riding is hard to find and easily lost."
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post #7 of 9 Old Yesterday, 10:52 PM
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Too many circles are hard on joints and many round pens have deep footing which makes it even harder. Lunging (free in a round pen or on a line) is either useful in small amounts, or seriously detrimental, and it depends entirely on HOW you lunge; is your horse running around like a llama, head in the air, or is she stretching forward and down and using her topline correctly?

Llama-horse behaviour is not beneficial. Stretching IS beneficial as it builds strength, balance and flexibility. Note that stretching is not solely about head position; the horse needs to remain forward and through from behind, working over the back, not just dragging their nose on the ground.
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post #8 of 9 Old Yesterday, 10:59 PM
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When I saddle up a young horse before I ride them I want to see them W/T/C before I get on. The main Reason for the canter/lope is if they are going to buck they will usually do it when asked to lope. I don't work any long time I just want them to transition up and down and know everything is ok and they can calm down after energying up and down. Then I'm ready to get on. If she is just trying to get the horse in shape the trot is adequate for that but, I'd rather do that with me in the saddle.
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post #9 of 9 Old Yesterday, 11:08 PM
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Yep, if you're going to be lunging the horse needs to be down and stretching out somewhat. That llama behavior negates the purpose of lunging in the first place. Now, enjoy a picture of my old gaited mare getting her chubby but into shape after winter. She's possibly the laziest, most laid-back horse I've ever owned.

"The art of riding is hard to find and easily lost."
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