Starting Liberty Tips - The Horse Forum
 1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 01-13-2020, 10:21 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: FLorida
Posts: 234
• Horses: 5
Question Starting Liberty Tips

Hi everyone, I was wondering if anyone had any tips on starting liberty work. I haven a 14 year old mare named Tequila, and I just started free leasing her and i wanted to try some liberty to bond with her. How can i start?
classybarrels is offline  
post #2 of 11 Old 01-13-2020, 10:38 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: CenTex
Posts: 3,134
• Horses: 1
If you're leasing her, I'd make sure the owner was OK with it first. My first horse, the owner didn't want me doing any liberty training, she thought it would mess him up.
ACinATX is online now  
post #3 of 11 Old 01-13-2020, 10:40 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: FLorida
Posts: 234
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
If you're leasing her, I'd make sure the owner was OK with it first. My first horse, the owner didn't want me doing any liberty training, she thought it would mess him up.
yes, my best friend let me free lease her and she said it was alright for me to start
shes also my competition mare. She doesn't get hot. Very sweet and smooth to ride
classybarrels is offline  
post #4 of 11 Old 01-13-2020, 10:46 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: CenTex
Posts: 3,134
• Horses: 1
My daughter has done a lot of liberty training with her horse Moonshine. She doesn't go into a lot of detail about how she trained her, but she does sort of list what they're doing and in what order. It might be useful for you.

https://www.horseforum.com/member-jo...ournal-805931/

She is working from the Book "Trick Training for Horses: Fun Ways to Engage, Challenge, and Bond with Your Horse"
ACinATX is online now  
post #5 of 11 Old 01-14-2020, 07:18 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: FLorida
Posts: 234
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
My daughter has done a lot of liberty training with her horse Moonshine. She doesn't go into a lot of detail about how she trained her, but she does sort of list what they're doing and in what order. It might be useful for you.

https://www.horseforum.com/member-jo...ournal-805931/

She is working from the Book "Trick Training for Horses: Fun Ways to Engage, Challenge, and Bond with Your Horse"
Ah okay! ill be sure to look into that thank you!!
classybarrels is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 01-14-2020, 08:51 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,830
• Horses: 2
Find a program (there are some online) and follow it to the letter. I don't think it's a good idea to just plunge into this without having a step-by-step program because there are a lot of ways you can create bad habits.

The first thing you should do is bond with your leased horse. Spend time just hanging out in an enclosed space like a paddock, indoor arena, etc. The horse should be completely free to wander around, and you shouldn't have any expectations that it will come up to you. If it does, ignore it. Just be together. Bring a book or practice mindfulness meditation. Creating a bond is the first step to creating that invisible elastic that makes the horse always want to come back to you. Do this for about 20 minutes per session for 4 or so sessions. Then move to greeting the horse by walking up to it and letting it sniff your hand, then walking away and back to your bonding time. Then greet and groom the horse, and walk away. Some horses will begin to follow you at this point. Some won't. There are exercises that will help you make this happen but it would take me too long to explain them here.

I follow a program called Horsefulness Training. It isn't free, but if you google it, you will find that there is some free content. The program is not expensive to purchase, and it really works amazingly well. Remember that liberty training means that the horse is allowed to say "no". You have to allow that, or it defeats the purpose. Some days, your horse will not be interested, but if you start by creating a solid bond (no treats are to be used for this btw), he will eventually want to follow you just like he'd follow a herd leader.
Acadianartist is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 01-14-2020, 09:33 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: FLorida
Posts: 234
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
Find a program (there are some online) and follow it to the letter. I don't think it's a good idea to just plunge into this without having a step-by-step program because there are a lot of ways you can create bad habits.

The first thing you should do is bond with your leased horse. Spend time just hanging out in an enclosed space like a paddock, indoor arena, etc. The horse should be completely free to wander around, and you shouldn't have any expectations that it will come up to you. If it does, ignore it. Just be together. Bring a book or practice mindfulness meditation. Creating a bond is the first step to creating that invisible elastic that makes the horse always want to come back to you. Do this for about 20 minutes per session for 4 or so sessions. Then move to greeting the horse by walking up to it and letting it sniff your hand, then walking away and back to your bonding time. Then greet and groom the horse, and walk away. Some horses will begin to follow you at this point. Some won't. There are exercises that will help you make this happen but it would take me too long to explain them here.

I follow a program called Horsefulness Training. It isn't free, but if you google it, you will find that there is some free content. The program is not expensive to purchase, and it really works amazingly well. Remember that liberty training means that the horse is allowed to say "no". You have to allow that, or it defeats the purpose. Some days, your horse will not be interested, but if you start by creating a solid bond (no treats are to be used for this btw), he will eventually want to follow you just like he'd follow a herd leader.
I've actually looked at that website yesterday and i was impressed with it! Tequila is good and she will greet me or nicker when i come to the barn. One other question is "can I be in a pasture with just her or i can have the rest of the horses with here while doing the session. Because there are two baby in the pasture and one of them is hers. Hes a 2 year old, and he just likes to come up to bother me or give me kisses and the other which is LT ¨little terd¨ He bites and he gets in my space. So should it just be her and me or are other horses okay too?

And also how much is it for the course
Acadianartist likes this.

Last edited by classybarrels; 01-14-2020 at 09:41 AM.
classybarrels is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 01-14-2020, 10:35 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 923
• Horses: 0
Good communication, willingness, and connected (mentally) with a rope on (groundwork) is the best foundation to expect easier success at Liberty, in my opinion and experience. If you don't already have that, I'd suggest getting that strong foundation first to set your horse up for success at Liberty. For example if she doesn't understand the body language , or even verbal, cues for send, halt, backup, sideways, yield HG and FQ,,then she's likely to blow you off if you try those at Liberty. I realize that you may mean something different than I'm thinking when you say "Liberty". The other thing to set it up for success is to start in a smaller area, like a rounpen, then move to bigger areas as you progress. It takes a Lot of advancement to send a horse out in a circle around you for several laps, then ask to come to you...in an open field, or to do a figure 8 around two obstacles (or dirt clods if that's all you have), in an open field. Just my opinions, and how I'd recommend that you start---with groundwork. If you already have a good foundation with groundwork, then I'd say simply start in a smallish area trying the same things you can do at groundwork that you KNOW she already understands, and see how they go at Liberty,,,eg. in groundwork will she walk with you at her shoulder, halt if you halt, back if you back, trot if you have more energy...all while keeping you at her shoulder , including turns both directions?? But, all that is just me...you may have different things in mind.

Have fun! stay safe. Keep us updated on your progress.

Respect......rapport......impulsion......flexion.. .
Be as soft as possible, but as firm as necessary--Pat Parelli
mslady254 is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 01-14-2020, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: FLorida
Posts: 234
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by mslady254 View Post
Good communication, willingness, and connected (mentally) with a rope on (groundwork) is the best foundation to expect easier success at Liberty, in my opinion and experience. If you don't already have that, I'd suggest getting that strong foundation first to set your horse up for success at Liberty. For example if she doesn't understand the body language , or even verbal, cues for send, halt, backup, sideways, yield HG and FQ,,then she's likely to blow you off if you try those at Liberty. I realize that you may mean something different than I'm thinking when you say "Liberty". The other thing to set it up for success is to start in a smaller area, like a rounpen, then move to bigger areas as you progress. It takes a Lot of advancement to send a horse out in a circle around you for several laps, then ask to come to you...in an open field, or to do a figure 8 around two obstacles (or dirt clods if that's all you have), in an open field. Just my opinions, and how I'd recommend that you start---with groundwork. If you already have a good foundation with groundwork, then I'd say simply start in a smallish area trying the same things you can do at groundwork that you KNOW she already understands, and see how they go at Liberty,,,eg. in groundwork will she walk with you at her shoulder, halt if you halt, back if you back, trot if you have more energy...all while keeping you at her shoulder , including turns both directions?? But, all that is just me...you may have different things in mind.

Have fun! stay safe. Keep us updated on your progress.
alright i will do that!! Thank you!!! She always follows me when i take the tack off and let her in the yard. I do feel like we are bonding more. I just hope it works out and yes i will totally keep yáll updated!!
classybarrels is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 01-14-2020, 02:32 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 48,431
• Horses: 2
It will be very much harder to work with any horse if they are in a group , free, in a pasture. That is like expert level.
tinyliny is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome