Too much energy? - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 48 Old 12-25-2015, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by ThallenCambricaltran View Post
He has 24 hour access to his own dry lot, which is about 40' by 30'.

I have an appointment for him to get his teeth floated since I noticed he's been dropping food out of his mouth when he chews. I appreciate any ideas or opinions you have to offer, keep it civil please. I'm a Junior in highschool, so limited time during the day to work with him, no close access to indoor riding. I am currently working mainly with my dressage instructor, and I work with my high school coaches at practices.
Hi Cambric, welcome to HF, you will find most people here are civil most of the time

IMHO it seems to me the main problem is the type of feed in ratio to the amount of work your horse is getting. Added to that he is cooped up in a small area (if I’m reading this right) and so cannot naturally run off excess energy.

Think of it like a steam train, you are stoking the engine with fuel, but when the energy builds up there is no outlet. Then you hop on to ride and want him to sedately do as you want, but he has so much energy he is bouncing off the walls.

Yes to getting his teeth done.

I would consider making the bulk of his feed good quality meadow hay. Get some specific advice for your horse from one of your instructors or a feed specialist, but I would be looking at something like chaff, lucerne chaff, formulated horse pellets for your level of work. If he needs building up I would probably use bran and/or cooked barley. Ideally he is getting time on pasture as well.

I also believe that a horse over 16hh takes noticeably more feeding than one of 15hh. They need a lot of bulk feed that can be accessed throughout the day. (good pasture, hay).

If you can’t work him more, perhaps there is someone else can exercise him sometimes. Just an idea.
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post #42 of 48 Old 12-26-2015, 08:58 PM
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That is not turn out, just because he is outside, LOL!
And, if you talk to an equine nutritionist, want to determine whether your horse is being fed hot calories, which do produce a sugar high, or just a supplement that can have no actual grain, but cool calories, it does matter as to what you call grain
Slang is okay, if everyone involved knows what you really mean, but not very helpful if asking someone if that stuff called 'grain', can cause a sugar high!, when in fact it contains no grain, but rather cool calories in the form of fats!
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post #43 of 48 Old 12-27-2015, 09:11 PM
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Originally Posted by ThallenCambricaltran View Post
Also, let me apologize for being from a region that uses different terminology than yours. It's such an inconvenience to you, really.
Don't get your knickers in a knot about it, but think about what we're saying. Yes, it's an inconvenience to us, when you use terms that aren't right, whether it's the norm for your area or not. Because we waste our time giving you irrelevant info. It's also an 'inconvenience' to you, to not only receive irrelevant info, but then have to explain yourself. And most of us here, if you were to say 'oh, yeah, I didn't mean actual grain, I meant this' would be happy to go on, whereas getting all upset because you use different terminology so weren't understood only makes people irritated.
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post #44 of 48 Old 04-27-2016, 04:30 PM Thread Starter
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"Don't get your knickers in a knot about it, but think about what we're saying. Yes, it's an inconvenience to us, when you use terms that aren't right, whether it's the norm for your area or not. Because we waste our time giving you irrelevant info. It's also an 'inconvenience' to you, to not only receive irrelevant info, but then have to explain yourself. And most of us here, if you were to say 'oh, yeah, I didn't mean actual grain, I meant this' would be happy to go on, whereas getting all upset because you use different terminology so weren't understood only makes people irritated."


My definition is that COB, is not the only feed called grain. Corn. Oats. Barley. Grain is whatever pelleted feed you are feeding that is not forage/hay. Grain is a generic term, COB is specific to corn, oats and barley. They are a TYPE of grain. I might not be feeding any grain by your definition, but I am by mine.

And I'm not changing my terminology for a single irrate individual on an internet forum.

We have different definitions, I asked my FEI certified dressage instructor, (education, yes?) and she said that she has always called pelleted feed grain, but it could be different in other countries or areas. I reside in America, in my town, and I feed my horse grain.
You can feed your horses their pelleted food and we can stop bickering about it.
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post #45 of 48 Old 04-27-2016, 05:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThallenCambricaltran View Post
"Don't get your knickers in a knot about it, but think about what we're saying. Yes, it's an inconvenience to us, when you use terms that aren't right, whether it's the norm for your area or not. Because we waste our time giving you irrelevant info. It's also an 'inconvenience' to you, to not only receive irrelevant info, but then have to explain yourself. And most of us here, if you were to say 'oh, yeah, I didn't mean actual grain, I meant this' would be happy to go on, whereas getting all upset because you use different terminology so weren't understood only makes people irritated."


My definition is that COB, is not the only feed called grain. Corn. Oats. Barley. Grain is whatever pelleted feed you are feeding that is not forage/hay. Grain is a generic term, COB is specific to corn, oats and barley. They are a TYPE of grain. I might not be feeding any grain by your definition, but I am by mine.

And I'm not changing my terminology for a single irrate individual on an internet forum.

We have different definitions, I asked my FEI certified dressage instructor, (education, yes?) and she said that she has always called pelleted feed grain, but it could be different in other countries or areas. I reside in America, in my town, and I feed my horse grain.
You can feed your horses their pelleted food and we can stop bickering about it.
WOW, now that must win the prize for the most belated come back in the history of the forum...

I simply cannot believe that you have revived this post simply to say stop bickering, seems to be an oxymoron right there.

You know you can call what you are feeding whatever the heck you like, but I have lived in many places, two different countries, and many many disciplines, and grain is grain......oats, barley, wheat, whatever GRAIN, what I feed my horse is a ration, unless I am adding calories in the winter with chop, milled grain.

I would not expect to come on here and have everyone know what 'chop' is, as far as I know it is a local expression.

It does a person well to remember that there are many people here with a good knowledge of nutrition, and they come from all over the world, funny this is the first thread that I have read where there has been a blow up because of what something is called.

Quote:
And I'm not changing my terminology for a single irrate individual on an internet forum.
Make that two irate individuals, good going, 100% increase by bringing this back up
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post #46 of 48 Old 04-27-2016, 05:49 PM
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Call any feed whatever you like, but if asking for advise, then grain has to apply to what the scientific definition is, and not any regional slang, where everyone knows what is really meant, in spite of term used
Shanked snaffle causes a similar confusion, with horseman knowing the bit is actually a curb,using it for convenience, but because of that term, many people also arrive at a horse show, to enter a snaffle bit class, or train a colt, asking for advise, thinking that the bit with those shanks and a broken mouth piece is a snaffle

Definition:

A grass such as wheat, oats, or corn, the starchy grains of which are used as food. b. The grain of such a grass. 2. Any of several other plants or their edible seeds or fruit, such as buckwheat or certain species of amaranth.

Therefore, call any pelleted feed grain for convenience, if you like, but when asking if that 'grain' can make a horse hot, anyone replying has to respond as to what grain is classified as a feed, and based on the fact, grain, thus scientifcally defined, is high in NSC,which in turn can cause sugar highs
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post #47 of 48 Old 04-27-2016, 06:34 PM
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If this thread has only been revived to start a pointless argument about terminology then it will be closed


If anyone wants to discuss terminologies and how they differ from country to country, place to place then please start a new thread on the subject
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post #48 of 48 Old 05-01-2016, 07:45 PM Thread Starter
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Feel free to close it.
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