Striding into jumps - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 04-01-2019, 05:37 PM Thread Starter
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Striding into jumps

With Bee I am trying to learn how to count out my stride going into jumps, how to control if they take the early or late stride, and working on slowing them down or speeding up to make the perfect stride.

How do you guys work on this? I am terrible at seeing distances lol.

Lil video of me attempting to speed up to make the striding work.
https://youtu.be/0SZwVAlDpsQ
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post #2 of 6 Old 04-01-2019, 07:09 PM
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Rhythm + Straightness = Distance

Pole work is great for developing your eye for distances without the concern of an actual fence. If you split a pole, not a big deal. For the most part, you shouldn't be dictating when your horse is taking off. You develop the canter before the fence, allow the horse to carry you to the fence, they find their distance, and you just follow them.

Basic exercises:

Set up a single ground pole and canter a 20m circle over it. Set up pylons or other markers at the other points on your circle to help maintain the shape of the circle. You need this for later exercises. You need a consistent rhythm and pace to be able to consistently get your striding to the pole.

The other exercise is to set up two poles in a straight line 5-6 strides apart. Measure it out. You ride into this in a normal canter until you are confident riding the poles in the target strides. The you try adding one stride, then taking a stride out. Remember, you need to prepare the canter before you get to the pole to get the striding you want.

Tip: if you are chipping the distance, slow down. If you are taking the distance long, speed up. General rule.

Once you are consistently getting the striding to the single pole on a circle, add a pole on the other side of the circle. Same principles apply. Consistent rhythm, pace, line. Count the strides. Should be ~7 strides between the two poles, but depends on your horse's step.

Once you have that down, add the two remaining poles.

It's a difficult exercise, one you can use all the way up the levels. It really tests your ability to sit still, make subtle corrections, and maintain your consistent canter. You can't adjust the canter stride until you first get your 'on pace' canter.

Here's a video of the circle exercise. Yes, its common name is Circle Of Death.




Few things on your video:
Move your hands with his canter. Your hands aren't moving with the natural motion of the head, each stride you are popping his mouth (slack, tight, slight, tight). That's contributing to his high headed carriage. He's guarding his mouth. That'll also effect his rhythm to the fence and your ability to regulate the stride. If you need to, push your hands in the neck. The neck will move your hands with him automatically.

You're pretty decent over the fence itself; flat back, looking up, hands in a good spot. It wouldn't hurt to grab mane over the fences as a precaution, though.

I'd probably raise your stirrups one hole. You need more anchor in your heel, and what kind of shoes are you wearing? Are those flats?!

Nice horse though. He's got a nice natural canter and jump. TB?
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post #3 of 6 Old 04-01-2019, 07:46 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
Rhythm + Straightness = Distance

Pole work is great for developing your eye for distances without the concern of an actual fence. If you split a pole, not a big deal. For the most part, you shouldn't be dictating when your horse is taking off. You develop the canter before the fence, allow the horse to carry you to the fence, they find their distance, and you just follow them.

Basic exercises:

Set up a single ground pole and canter a 20m circle over it. Set up pylons or other markers at the other points on your circle to help maintain the shape of the circle. You need this for later exercises. You need a consistent rhythm and pace to be able to consistently get your striding to the pole.

The other exercise is to set up two poles in a straight line 5-6 strides apart. Measure it out. You ride into this in a normal canter until you are confident riding the poles in the target strides. The you try adding one stride, then taking a stride out. Remember, you need to prepare the canter before you get to the pole to get the striding you want.

Tip: if you are chipping the distance, slow down. If you are taking the distance long, speed up. General rule.

Once you are consistently getting the striding to the single pole on a circle, add a pole on the other side of the circle. Same principles apply. Consistent rhythm, pace, line. Count the strides. Should be ~7 strides between the two poles, but depends on your horse's step.

Once you have that down, add the two remaining

I'd probably raise your stirrups one hole. You need more anchor in your heel, and what kind of shoes are you wearing? Are those flats?!

Nice horse though. He's got a nice natural canter and jump. TB?
I’ll try raising the stirrups when I ride tomorrow. Yes I am wearing vans lol. It was after school and I wasn’t planning on riding but I decided to hop on, normally my heels are down and my feet don’t curve like that it’s just a more flexible sole. Normally I ride in tall boots lol.
Yes he is a Tb!
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post #4 of 6 Old 04-01-2019, 11:35 PM
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I donít know if you have ever been taught this....the goal of riding jumps is to stay out of the horseís way. Pick your seat, and just stay there. Wait. Heels down, so your leg is firm, hands following and sot, as Apuesto said. Eyes on the NEXT jump, or a fence....wait. It requires NO lifting, folding, etc, of your body, just stay balanced and out of the way.
Foxhunter, Filou and JoBlueQuarter like this.

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post #5 of 6 Old 04-02-2019, 11:31 AM
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Grids using poles and small jumps are great for developing a rider's ability to see a stride and shorten or lengthen a stride as well as improving the way a horse performs.
Ideally you want to set up the poles so the horse is cantering through them on his own natural stride and then change the distances so you have to ask for a shorter or longer stride so the horse still puts in the same number of strides between the poles.


Looking at your video I feel that your horse (and I know its still very early days) is more about speed and not enough about impulsion. That's pretty typical for a TB that's not had the training to work any other way.
You need to work towards establishing a more consistent 'quiet' contact so you can ride him into your hand rather than through your hand and that way when you are closing or opening your hands to alter the amount of resistance you give to lengthen or shorten his stride or just give you more elevation he'll respond with more energy and less speed
You're seat shouldn't be too far out of the saddle or your body too far forward when you're working grids with low jumps and ground poles. Your hands and arms need to be a lot 'quieter' with more elasticity, you'll find your horse a lot easier to 'gather' together if he's not afraid of being bumped in the mouth

Just winging it is not a plan
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post #6 of 6 Old 05-18-2019, 12:11 PM
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Someone posted a thread about this exact thing a few months ago...

The distance comes from your pace around the corner, it's where your pace to a fence is established.

Sure we can put down poles and practice moving up and waiting, but even better, you should already have the distance to the fence chosen when you come around from the corner, not a few strides out from the fence. You just set the pace and wait.
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