Borrowed Knickers- and other college equestrian problems - Page 20 - The Horse Forum
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post #191 of 247 Old 07-11-2019, 11:26 AM Thread Starter
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And I have not yet called the vet. Ours jumps to his x-ray machine faster than you can say "that doesn't seem relevant here" and will happily charge you $300 for the inconclusive useless endeavor.


"Stay ON the horse IN the arena" -my trainer.
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post #192 of 247 Old 07-11-2019, 11:44 AM
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Yeah there is no way I would call a vet for what is probably some mild bruising of some sort or another. If one of mine was acting that way I would check the hooves real well to make sure there is nothing poking him and then ride a different horse for a few days until he was back up and around again not acting sore. Like you said earlier it is probably some type of mild pasture injury.
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post #193 of 247 Old 07-11-2019, 12:04 PM Thread Starter
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Yes. Calling the vet hasn't yet hit my radar.
If I wasn't looking at showing relatively soon I'd just let him dink around in the pasture for a few days. But as he's pretty much my main horse, and meets me at the gate everyday, we soak feet.


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post #194 of 247 Old 07-13-2019, 09:29 PM
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If *I* had to go to the vet everytime *I* was slightly lame or moving slightly asymmetrically, we'd have to sell our house...

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post #195 of 247 Old 07-15-2019, 05:53 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by SueC View Post
If *I* had to go to the vet everytime *I* was slightly lame or moving slightly asymmetrically, we'd have to sell our house...

Yes I think at this point most of us riders are no longer "using sound" I would hate to see my PPE

-arthritic mare of short stature with small feet. Markedly lame traveling left. Old fracture visible on X-RAY healed incorrectly. Smashed dock of tail and significant loss of vision in the right eye. Heaves.
Add to that the words "chestnut mare" and only the meat buyer would take me.
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post #196 of 247 Old 07-17-2019, 08:00 PM
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, @lostastirrup ! That's hilarious!

Let's see, what have we got on the market here? Hmmmm - "Bonded older mare-and-stallion pair of workhorses, approx.18-20 years old, unable to produce foals or be separated for long periods of time, used to working in tandem when in harness, and doing long trails together when at leisure. Male has glowing red eyes and bad attitude, female neighs constantly, both have odd senses of humour which show up in various ways. Require special feeding with a mix of organic produce; refuse kibbles or manufactured convenience feeds. Work sound most days but tend to limp and groan a lot until warmed up properly. Paddock sound when not work sound; sometimes horizontal and apparently lifeless for hours. Mare has at least three healed fractures in the feet; stallion has healed cracked ribs from jousting and a healed cracked phalange from random striking out during a fit of bad temper. Both horses ageing but still presentable. Good workers, softies underneath the crabby surfaces. Will only be sold together."

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post #197 of 247 Old 07-17-2019, 08:11 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by SueC View Post
, @lostastirrup ! That's hilarious!

Let's see, what have we got on the market here? Hmmmm - "Bonded older mare-and-stallion pair of workhorses, approx.18-20 years old, unable to produce foals or be separated for long periods of time, used to working in tandem when in harness, and doing long trails together when at leisure. Male has glowing red eyes and bad attitude, female neighs constantly, both have odd senses of humour which show up in various ways. Require special feeding with a mix of organic produce; refuse kibbles or manufactured convenience feeds. Work sound most days but tend to limp and groan a lot until warmed up properly. Paddock sound when not work sound; sometimes horizontal and apparently lifeless for hours. Mare has at least three healed fractures in the feet; stallion has healed cracked ribs from jousting and a healed cracked phalange from random striking out during a fit of bad temper. Both horses ageing but still presentable. Good workers, softies underneath the crabby surfaces. Will only be sold together."
Can i get the story behind the "glowing red eyes"?


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post #198 of 247 Old 07-19-2019, 12:57 AM
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OK - this is basically a little fantasy of Brett's. He likes to think he has glowing red eyes, in a parallel universe. I don't know if it's too much Dr Who (another oxymoron, I'm sure) or if it's from the end of the clip for Boys Don't Cry by The Cure. He also says that the surname Coulstock actually means "The Smiter Of The Foe." I have no compunctions in going along with such harmless products of a fertile imagination.

Go to 1:45 here for the beginning of the glowing eyes idea...


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post #199 of 247 Old 07-22-2019, 08:12 PM Thread Starter
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Trails, timing the changes, and the evermore elitism of dressage. Also he's sound ag.

@SueC
I feel like a workhorse stud with an attitude and broken ribs from jousting very well could have glowing red eyes. And I feel even more strongly that people would pay for the novelty. I'm sure his "mare" is very patient with him and affords him sunglasses when the glowing red eyes have to go out in public.

what on Earth is up with dressage these days? And do all these brands even know what "horse poor" is?

I had intended to show a rated show this year, but due to finances it did not fly. Show fees were almost $1000 with memberships and I was plainly shocked. When I showed in Highschool our local club did a pretty good job of keeping class fees low and stabling reasonable. I camped out at the grounds in a single person tent and lived out of my dad's Subaru for the weekend feasting on Chef Boyardee, poptarts and fortune cookies. I wore hand-me down show clothes and sat the trot to avoid having the judge see the giant red clay stain on the backside of the breeches (The next year I was smart and bought 3 pairs of white Walmart jeggings) since I had been able to reasonably afford to show one horse (I had a few other horses I rode for the owners that they footed fees for) I figured I could afford to show my horse for one show. Oh no. Class fees were upwards of $60, no tent camping allowed on the grounds, and neither was sleeping in your car allowed. Membership fees were huge for the local club and USDF/USEF. Stalls were 1/3 of what I pay monthly for board per night. And you were not allowed to bring your own shavings, but they would happily sell you some for an arm and a leg. The end result was the biggest nope that ever noped and I decided I needed to stay home. I'm horse poor. And I thought a lot of other riders were too, but if the prices indicate anything about the "market" of dressage, I'm way below the target audience. Which brought me to the vexation that has been driving me crazy for the last couple of years. If you're on FB or Instagram or any other SM you've probably seen a growing trend in "Equine Couture" with matchy- matchy- tack and equipment, satin saddle pads, extremely stylish breeches and glorious stable grounds to background it all. Don't get me wrong- I'm all for looking tidy and presentable but it's over the top. The horses are more a backdrop for an overpriced fashion statement and how well you ride is not as important as how put together you look. The same matchy- elegant set ups with the custom saddles and $100's of dollar outfits are often paired with draw reins and tie downs and tight flashes. To me the fad of the aesthetic presentation is taking away from the horsemanship- which I've long defined as "getting your horse out day after day irregardless of the weather and trying to do better by them than you did the day before" and thus slowly stacking the building blocks to making a great team, a better seat, a quieter feel, and a more willing mount. And as far as I can tell- spending 100's on breeches and saddle pads doesn't make much of an impact.
Which brings me to the question- what the heckle happened? Is it the fault of social media? Of the riders? Of the trainers? How do we take a sport culture and take it back to the mud and the dirt and the hard work that defines it?
I guess I'm just rather peeved. I will however not apologise for me "something of a rant"
Also someone called my trailer a "piece of crap" and I'm feeling deeply wounded since though cheap and old it is solid and it has faithfully and reliably performed it's duty; which has probably further fueled this rant.

pony up in the timber or "a really nice trail ride by ourselves since no one wanted to come along thank you very much"

On a more jovial note I took the pony up into the mountains and had a glorious four hour ride up in the timber. A barn friend told me about a nice Sandy trail that met up with another equally lovely trail and it was just down the road too. So I loaded pony up and we made an afternoon of it complete with a picnic lunch. Usually most of our "trail riding" only happens when we go out to the ranch to move cows. Pony was wonderful and very good and made excellent time. I don't know how far we went since I'm as directionally challenged as the average lemming but he was moving at a good clip and it certainly seemed like we went down three valleys and up three hills/very-small-mountains. There are pictures.

how a clueless amateur gets the changes since she's clearly never done this before.
On Thursday I trailered out to a gentleman down the road who has a lovely arena and is an even lovelier host, (this has been a weekly thing now) and we ride and critique each other. We worked on laterals and our geometry in a lettered arena. And as a resultpony felt very under himself. So when he jumped to canter and just felt there I asked for a change. And i got it. Which is pretty much how I always ask for a change. I don't really school them. Or plan to school them, but when he has a good day and feels ready- i ask. And it's given me pretty good odds for success. Someday I will need to be able to get them on my time and where I desire them exactly but for now I like how this works. I like how it keeps him calm and gives him confidence and I can build on success. The lady I bought Nick from I watched school her upper level horse in the changes in such a way that he was a nervous, heavy, late behind wreck, every ride they worked on the changes and there was not much for improvement. But there's a better way if you're willing to take the time and you don't have a lot of help, and you don't have any idea how to train them. I can feel if he's ready, if he may offer, and I can ask. And so far- though he is far from being perfect, he is calm and he changes in front and behind and he Canter's off without getting heavy. We have plenty of time, and we will take advantage of it.
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"Stay ON the horse IN the arena" -my trainer.
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post #200 of 247 Old 07-23-2019, 06:05 AM
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I think there are a lot of dressage divas and snobs and I suppose I always found it amusing when they'd over horse themselves because it was a pretty horse but they couldnt ride it. Then they'd trash talk every other rider spreading gossip and I remember thinking these are not happy people. They think buying stuff and throwing money around will make them better but they dont learn. Just enjoy your horse, take lessons with a competent trainer but they go with the trendy trainer and clinic with the trendy clinicians regardless of if they're good or not and basically pay to be told what they want to hear.

I think in US trainers will lie to your face and take your money. I've heard so many trainers who imo arent qualified telling their clients their horse could do the GP if they just pay for more lessons and most of the time the horse would likely struggle to move out of 2nd level because it cant sit. Or IDK I've seen a lot of ugly things, I dont miss where I used to live. It is SO SO political and trainers at each others throats, even though almost all of them suck. They can ride something made or is a natural but cant ride anything not born for it. Cant problem solve or sit the croup down, encouraging their students to have tight still hips to look still and equitation pretty but have no feel. I dont miss it.

I really think it is American culture of materialism and egocentrism. A lot of people dont care what the truth is, as long as they "appear" a certain way. I feel like it's a culture of arrogance and people trying to place themselves over another in any way they can. Competition based without respect or compassion for one another. I feel like a lot of people are really fake. I know not all Americans are like that but there are a lot and that is often how clients are. I also feel America is very service based and I am often amazed by how people in service industries kiss the butt of their clients. In Europe, it is not like that. People are expected to be responsible for their own stupidity and selves, do something stupid you cant just sue somebody and get your way to make up for stupidity. I feel services are fair and respectful here in Denmark but they dont kiss anyone's butt. I also think another factor is the legal culture in the US of the truth being what you can convince people to believe, rather than what is. I feel here the two faced, talking out the @ss way isnt tolerated and people see through it pretty fast. I think people are @ss holes and it's hard not to take it personally, I know I would too but I think sometimes it's good to remember they only do that because they feel inadequate in themselves in some way and feel bringing you down will lift them in some way. People are petty and most often the most petty people are the ones who say well I just call it like I see it and it's like no you're just really rude and think insulting other people will make you feel better but it doesnt.

So those are some ideas for why it is the way it is. Culture and what is tolerated. Here if you have money and want to ride, sure you'll spend money but you'll also be expected to work your @ss off. It's political here as well but different. I think a weakness here is a lot of those riders you see on the national level is they have never sat on anything that didnt have a natural ability for it and wouldnt be able to ride a horse like your Nick or my Wonder at all because they've always ridden something with natural suppleness and ease or agreeable temperament and have a very set system and are not flexible. Horse fits in system or gets the boot. Not all but a lot lack the sort of problem solving or dynamic thinking it takes to try an out of the box type horse.

I think that is wise and a good approach, it's important to put the idea of a change in there and not make counter canter too good that they cannot change but it's a good approach and mind set. I think schoolmasters help a lot with the changes, last year when Id lesson on Image we'd have to do 4 time and 3 time changes. Getting the count isnt easy. As well as proper canter pirouettes and how to use the half pass to improve the change, so sometimes half pass change, half pass change, etc. All the exercises piece together. Sometimes they're just there and other times it's tricky. I remember at a show watching a trainer whose ridden the GP chase a horse into the changes, then a horse was late so she grabbed hold of the curb spurring and spanking a horse like a cowboy in a tight circle beating on it for being late in a change. I was always amazed by the horses who tolerate it. I dont know of any Id ridden that would just sit and take that kind of treatment. And they were back to work, horse wasnt tense or worried just back to work. That was in the warm up, Id be scared of what happened at home. I can say some interesting things Ive seen in the warm up. Seen a former olympian (not the one I worked for) sit a horse down he put so much pressure on it to sit, the horse just sat down like I cant do it. Even people at the top of the sport, I think a lot of people would be SHOCKED if they saw what happened behind closed doors because they go into the arena and look AMAZING, in harmony and pleasant but behind closed doors that isnt what happens in the training. A lot arent rough like that but I really think people would get a wake up call.

But Im glad you have a good time in the mountains. I am really envious!! I'd love to go into the mountains to see such nature! I bet pony and you love it and it's a great way to clear your head!
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