Trials and Tribulations of the Adult Beginner - Page 10 - The Horse Forum
 743Likes
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #91 of 270 Old 11-02-2016, 08:44 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 46,605
• Horses: 2
in this regard, Facebook is your friend. you can find all kinds of groups there.

our saddle club is always happy to welcome new members. however, we don't have horses for rent or sharing
carshon and Cammey like this.
tinyliny is offline  
post #92 of 270 Old 11-03-2016, 01:46 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 110
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whinnie View Post
Wow, I'm glad that in my area you can join a club as a beginner with interest whether one has a horse or not. Or are a skilled rider or not. I have never heard of entry requirements to merely join a club. Sounds like these clubs where you live are too pretentious for my taste.

There may be beginner stuff that just isnít visible online and thus Iím missing it. Or it might be (and does kinda seem to be) that there are a tremendous number of lessons, activities, and clubs aimed at kids and then itís sort of assumed that by the time youíre an adult you already have some clue what youíre doing. As to if my area is pretentiousÖ no good context to judge by to be honest. Iím literally going by websites for things in the area right now.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rain Shadow View Post
If you are ever in Florida, come riding with me. Harley and Trixie will take care of their newbs and Kenzie and I will show you a real trail ride.

I would absolutely love to . Thank you very, very much for the offer.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairie View Post
I'm also surprised that the equine organizations have restrictions on your riding level since any that I've belonged to have welcomed newbies. If we have a newbie join our trail riding club, we both choose a trail that even the newest horse and/or ride can easily complete when they show up, and also those on calm, friendly horses surround the newbies so their horses will gain confidence from ours and we can talk the rider through any problems. Many Polo club offer lessons on trained horses---I have a friends who is pushing me to join her since she's taken a couple of series and claims it's really fun. Hunt clubs are always looking for ground help if you aren't up to riding----there's also the option of hill topping when you are comfortable riding in the open which does not involve any jumping or being in the thick of the hunt itself.

Just to clarify with a bit more detail: the Polo club has social memberships available - but Iíd feel quite strange paying several hundred dollars just to go hang out somewhere that I donít know anyone and stalk a social group that I have no real connection to. I may try to attend their public matches, but I missed the last one for the season. They also have classes available for anyone which I might eventually look at - but their small group lessons cost literally more than twice what Iím paying per-hour for my private lessons right now, and their private rates for a single weekly lesson would literally cover a full lease on a showable horse at the place I was looking at leasing a horse from (farrier, de-worm and vet excludedÖ but still). Itís a tradeoff Iím not quite ready to make for an activity where Iíd then still need to spend months and months working on riding basics. So, to be fair, this one is a bit self-imposed - I just donít want to spend polo-lesson rates for the most basic Ďhow to stay on the horseí stuff which I am under the impression will be foundational to playing the game.

Now, this group does periodically offer short clinics/introduction days which I am seriously thinking of dropping in for, but the last one was September and Iíd be surprised if they have any more before the Spring (and I am watching to see if they have some in spring). Overall this is something I really do want to try out - but I donít know if committing to lessons is reasonable given where Iím at right now. Iím open to the idea I might be wrong here.

The years comment though was mostly in reference to actually riding a fox hunt and trying to do things with that group. The lowest-level activity they appear to offer is their trail riding which requests the horse/rider combo be able to ďTrot and canter safely in a group setting outside of the ringĒ in order to attend. This is billed as a good way to get up the skills required for actually participating in a fox hunt. I am not sure when the ability to do that will be a reasonable expectation for me, but I do know Iím not there yet (to leave aside the part about not having a horse). If Iím incredibly optimistic I suppose I might hit that bar next spring/summer in time to join their seasonÖ but I am trying not to get too presumptuous in those regards.

I hadnít considered (nor heard of) hill topping as an option. And itís also true: they do offer purely social memberships and Ďsupportingí memberships - but again it seems quite strange to me to just hang out and stalk them when I donít know anyone and canít really participate in the bulk of their activities. They do ask their members to take part in trail-trimming and the like and I canít see a reason theyíd refuse additional helpÖ but isnít it little weird to just show up and trim peopleís riding trails with no other context or connection? Am I weird for thinking thatíd be kind of weird? (Genuine question - I might be misunderstanding the social norms).

So some of my hesitancy here is admittedly of my own making - in both cases because I donít feel I could really participate at this point in the core activities of each group. Polo is definitely the lower entry-bar between the two since they DO offer beginner lessons to get started... Fox Hunting I honestly donít consider realistic until I can at the very least justify going to the rides they use for skill-development. I could probably hang around their club-house, but that seems almost a little silly if I'm not at all actually involved with things.

Your trail-riding group sounds incredibly awesome and welcoming. So far I havenít had luck finding anything that looks quite so beginner-friendly yet. Doesnít mean it doesnít exist - just that my searching hasnít yet found it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
in this regard, Facebook is your friend. you can find all kinds of groups there.


our saddle club is always happy to welcome new members. however, we don't have horses for rent or sharing

Facebook! I admittedly hadnít really thought to try there. Iíve mostly been google-searching for sites. I will start digging around in that avenue. Thank you for the tip/idea!

Yeah, being horseless is another limitation Iím just going to have for a while. Even assuming I do some sort of leasing a horse to practice with I currently possess neither a trailer nor a vehicle capable of pulling a trailer - both of which I assume Iíd need to bring said horse to events. As I believe you yourself have mentioned, the only real response to that one for now is patience.
Cammey is offline  
post #93 of 270 Old 11-03-2016, 05:28 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,422
• Horses: 2
I'd say having a social group with horses can be very difficult. There are so many sub-cultures in the horse world. Most barns I've boarded at did not have people who identified with me or my riding.

There are a lot of people who only want to ride in an arena, often preferring to do it alone. I've tried many times to get these types to come out for a ride, promising that I will walk slowly, avoid anything they find overwhelming, get off and lead their horse if necessary, ride their horse through rough patches, etc. It rarely has convinced them to head out into the outdoors.

There are those who only are interested in people who compete in the discipline they like. I was at a gaming barn for awhile, and if you didn't barrel race on a quarter horse, they didn't care to be around you or talk to you.

Sadly, many people are also ashamed of their riding level and don't want to go out unless they're with others with similar skills. For me, it's enjoyable to go out and have a gentle ride, and it's good for horses to have those rides mixed in with more challenging ones. No one should be embarrassed about bouncing around or losing a stirrup because we all began that way.

But I can understand the sentiment. If I were to go rock climbing with an experienced climber, I would feel I was holding them back and annoying them just because they were so good at it.

Riding is easier than some sports or hobbies to just show up and do, so it's mainly a matter of coordinating schedules with people. You don't have to haul a kayak to some river or have perfect weather or set aside a huge chunk of time.

It would be nice if you could find someone who wanted help getting their 2nd, trained horse exercised and wouldn't mind teaching you. I've had several riders be my exercise rider and have given lessons to some in exchange for coming out with me once a week. Endurance riders are famous for having a back up horse and not having time to condition both. Yet they want someone to help keep the extra horse fit in case their #1 horse has an issue. It only took about a month's worth of lessons for me to get a high school girl out of the arena and conditioning horses on the trails with me.

I'd say it can be helpful to find the really passionate horse people (such as many who are on this forum). These are the types that don't think you need a reason to be just hanging around where horses are, and think it is natural to want to get on and ride. Most of us have had periods where we didn't have our own ride and sympathize with how difficult it can be to get regular riding in.

To me, the best horse people are those who want to think and breathe horses (especially when at the barn) and rarely consider...there are other subjects to talk about?

My experience was that I enjoyed lessons immensely when I couldn't have a horse. But as soon as it was possible for me to own one, lessons were extremely frustrating. I didn't want to go home afterward. An hour was too short, and over too soon. I wanted freedom. My cousin let me go out and ride her second horse whenever I wanted, and that was better....except spending time with him made me want my own horse even more. It was less than six months of this before I bought my own horse. With my own horse, I enjoyed lessons much more.
phantomhorse13 and Cammey like this.
gottatrot is offline  
post #94 of 270 Old 11-03-2016, 08:50 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: NE Pa
Posts: 6,365
• Horses: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cammey View Post
They do ask their members to take part in trail-trimming and the like and I canít see a reason theyíd refuse additional helpÖ but isnít it little weird to just show up and trim peopleís riding trails with no other context or connection?
I would LOVE if you randomly showed up some time I was trimming trail!! Finding people willing to do the work of trail maintenance and not just take advantage of the using the trails someone else cleared is hard (though maybe hunts are required to do such things as part of membership?).

However, I know there can be a lot of etiquette around hunting, so can't say for sure what kind of reception you would get. But someone willing to work for free sure seems like a no-brainer and it might allow you to make some good connections, especially if you are outgoing enough to explain to the people you meet that you are a new rider looking for more learning opportunities.

I can understand not wanting to spend a bunch of money for memberships at this stage, as I am sure you are not dealing with unlimited funds. Do you have any horse rescues or therapeutic riding centers in your area? Those places are always looking for volunteers and its often a way to get some great hands-on learning in exchange for some work.
gottatrot, Tazzie, carshon and 3 others like this.


There is no joy equal to that found on the back of a horse.
phantomhorse13 is offline  
post #95 of 270 Old 11-03-2016, 01:05 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: The boondocks of Kansas
Posts: 1,271
• Horses: 0
When you feel you are able to ride comfortably in the open at all gaits, perhaps consider joining one the groups that interests you. Also, many of us with trailers are willing to give rides to others who don't have a trailer. Even when my 3 friends and I get together for our monthly ride (we've known each other for ages), we only take one trailer to save on gas, taking turns about whose trailer we use.
gottatrot and Cammey like this.
Prairie is offline  
post #96 of 270 Old 11-03-2016, 04:34 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 110
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
I'd say having a social group with horses can be very difficult. There are so many sub-cultures in the horse world. Most barns I've boarded at did not have people who identified with me or my riding.
This makes a lot of sense to me. The gamer/geek community which I count myself part of is often the same way - lots of people grouped under one umbrella and sharing a lot of superficial similarities to outsiders, but honestly very interested in their own worlds once you get into the details. There isnít even necessarily anything wrong with that per-say, but itís good to know what Iím getting into and to know I should add this as another factor I consider when looking at things like where to board, etc.

I appreciate you putting into words something Iíve been noticing but wasnít sure if I was quite seeing right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
Sadly, many people are also ashamed of their riding level and don't want to go out unless they're with others with similar skills. For me, it's enjoyable to go out and have a gentle ride, and it's good for horses to have those rides mixed in with more challenging ones. No one should be embarrassed about bouncing around or losing a stirrup because we all began that way.

But I can understand the sentiment. If I were to go rock climbing with an experienced climber, I would feel I was holding them back and annoying them just because they were so good at it.
I have a pretty high tolerance for embarrassing myself so long as Iím genuinely not annoying the people around me and am being safe. That said, I can be a little sensitive on the Ďnot annoying peopleí point, especially if I feel that people are going out of their way for me or I carry them in high esteem. I very much grew up the bullied geeky outsider. I have gained a tremendous amount of confidence since then, but Iíve also developed a disinterest in being anywhere Iím not welcome and a deep appreciation for those places where I genuinely am. I can embarrass myself all day (see: overweight in a leotard in a room full of athletic 20 year olds surrounded by wall-to-wall mirrors) but the last thing I want is to hold up the class.

A note on climbing specifically: One of the cool things about starting climbing, at least with gym top rope (which is where most beginners start), is that once you get to the ďsafe to belayĒ point just a few hours in, skill level no longer really matters much for partnering in the vast majority of cases (until you get to lead, but thatís another style of climbing entirely). In practice each person takes turns climbing and thereís no need to be climbing the same routes. While it can be fun to both be working on the same things so you can discuss them this is a very small benefit. This is why people drag their random friends into climbing: a newbie partner really is ~90% as good as an old-hat one for most purposes. So long as you pay rigorous attention to safety and treat it with the seriousness itís due you would contribute just as much as someone whoís been around 10 years.

If you ever develop curiosity and have the inclination to try climbing I would be thrilled to show you what I mean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
It would be nice if you could find someone who wanted help getting their 2nd, trained horse exercised and wouldn't mind teaching you. I've had several riders be my exercise rider and have given lessons to some in exchange for coming out with me once a week. Endurance riders are famous for having a back up horse and not having time to condition both. Yet they want someone to help keep the extra horse fit in case their #1 horse has an issue. It only took about a month's worth of lessons for me to get a high school girl out of the arena and conditioning horses on the trails with me.
That would be amazingly perfect, and might lead me to try to see if there are groups of endurance riders around here. That would honestly be excellent if I could run across such a thing. Iíd be thrilled to follow someoneís lesson plans/exercise schedule for a horse - we could both use the work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
My experience was that I enjoyed lessons immensely when I couldn't have a horse. But as soon as it was possible for me to own one, lessons were extremely frustrating. I didn't want to go home afterward. An hour was too short, and over too soon. I wanted freedom. My cousin let me go out and ride her second horse whenever I wanted, and that was better....except spending time with him made me want my own horse even more. It was less than six months of this before I bought my own horse. With my own horse, I enjoyed lessons much more.
I can definitely understand that. All told itís amazing how fast and hard the get-a-horse bug bites. How long were you riding before you started to consider it out of curiosity?

I am in the precarious position that I theoretically could pull that trigger, but really, really shouldnít for a multitude of very obvious reasonsÖ but I canít deny Iíve done a little pre-research (ok, how much would horse board and care really cost given my situationÖ). Thankfully, itís so hilariously obvious to me that Iím not ready thereís no real temptation just yet.

Ö but I may have bought a couple books on horse care/health and made a point to begin learning some of those theoretical foundations - you knowÖ just in case those reasons cease to be as relevant in a few years...


Quote:
Originally Posted by phantomhorse13 View Post
I would LOVE if you randomly showed up some time I was trimming trail!! Finding people willing to do the work of trail maintenance and not just take advantage of the using the trails someone else cleared is hard (though maybe hunts are required to do such things as part of membership?).

However, I know there can be a lot of etiquette around hunting, so can't say for sure what kind of reception you would get. But someone willing to work for free sure seems like a no-brainer and it might allow you to make some good connections, especially if you are outgoing enough to explain to the people you meet that you are a new rider looking for more learning opportunities.
Hmm, I may consider reaching out to them. I heard about this via their newsletter (which they posted on their site). They were asking their members to come and dedicate some time. I could spend a few weekend days on it. I actually somewhat enjoy that sort of thing - though I donít do much of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phantomhorse13 View Post
Do you have any horse rescues or therapeutic riding centers in your area? Those places are always looking for volunteers and its often a way to get some great hands-on learning in exchange for some work.
This is an amazing idea. Yes, there is a horse rescue not far from here! And they have open drop-in volunteering hours to boot. One of them is conveniently right after my Saturday lessons actually (with just enough time to grab brunch between). This would be an amazing way to learn more about the realities of horse care.

Alright, I am going to try this out. Iím not sure if I will manage it this weekend or not due to a potential schedule conflict but if not this weekend then probably next weekend. Thank you. I am really excited about this actually.

Iím not sure why the idea of what will probably be mucking out stalls is so exciting to me right now - but it honestly really is.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairie View Post
When you feel you are able to ride comfortably in the open at all gaits, perhaps consider joining one the groups that interests you. Also, many of us with trailers are willing to give rides to others who don't have a trailer. Even when my 3 friends and I get together for our monthly ride (we've known each other for ages), we only take one trailer to save on gas, taking turns about whose trailer we use.
Yes, this is basically my plan. Right now Iím thinking of shooting for the next polo beginner seminar they offer (Iím guessing Spring). Then, as soon as I feel comfortable and have access to a horse Iíll look at the hunt trail rides. Really Iím just trying to put as much effort as I can towards that bar of Ďride comfortably in the open at all gaitsí and general horse-knowledge. My sort of perfect world scenario right now is to use the winter to try to get in a lot of my arena-knowledge while itís too cold to really ride out and maybe be ready for the spring. Though, as Iíve been saying I have no idea how reasonable or unreasonable that is.

The fact that people sometimes share trailers is good to know. Iíd be thrilled for an arrangement like I pay gas but we use their trailer or some such. Really though this sounds like one of those needing to know people situations.
Cammey is offline  
post #97 of 270 Old 11-03-2016, 06:24 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Desert side of Pacific Northwest
Posts: 193
• Horses: 0
This is great now to read that you are figuring out ways to get involved with others who have horses! Really lots of good ideas here. For certain, if you volunteered on trails with the horse associations in our areas, several of which go out for a whole day to clear trails in late spring, coming also from the west side of the Cascades over to our side, you would definitely meet up with lots of people and probably find some that have extra horses that they need to have exercised, as others have mentioned. In our area, those horse clubs are called things like Trail Riders or Backriders Associations and you could find out from the local Forest Service offices what they are called in your area and what days in the late spring or early summer they have scheduled with the Forest Service to do the trail maintenance. Since we are on the hiking and stock-packing side of the equation, that is how I know how valuable those horsemen's associations are to all of us who use the trails and that the way I find out when the trails will be cleared is to call the Forest Service offices. So, trail-clearing won't be something you can do this late in the year, but you can be ready or be looking for them, if still interested in finding a group to join in the spring. I'll be looking forward to the stories of what ways you find to get more riding time in the winter!
gottatrot and Cammey like this.
LlamaPacker is offline  
post #98 of 270 Old 11-03-2016, 08:20 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 292
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cammey View Post
All told itís amazing how fast and hard the get-a-horse bug bites. How long were you riding before you started to consider it out of curiosity?

I am in the precarious position that I theoretically could pull that trigger, but really, really shouldnít for a multitude of very obvious reasonsÖ but I canít deny Iíve done a little pre-research (ok, how much would horse board and care really cost given my situationÖ). Thankfully, itís so hilariously obvious to me that Iím not ready thereís no real temptation just yet.

Ö but I may have bought a couple books on horse care/health and made a point to begin learning some of those theoretical foundations - you knowÖ just in case those reasons cease to be as relevant in a few years...
Okay, I know you said that there's no real temptation to get a horse yet, but I just want to double caution against getting to wrapped up in the idea of ownership so quickly. There's so much involved with owning your own horseóblanketing/clipping, feed, identifying health problems/lameness, proper conditioning methods, tack selection, saddle fit, continued training, etc., plus the things you wouldn't expect to have to deal with like barn politics, conflicting advice, faulty professionals... the lists go on and on, and most of it is things that you can read about, but that you don't really learn until you're confronted with them a few times.

Don't try to jump into it all too quickly, especially since you seem set on getting a more high maintenance breed of horse (there are calm OTTB's out there, for sure, but it sounds like you might be gung ho about the idea of getting something more high energy).

If you're looking to progress faster, I'd take more lessons a week (so two or three times a week, or more!) and then eventually look at the idea of leasing (through your lesson program, if possible) when you're at the point where you can walk/trot/canter without supervision and you've experienced at least a couple of spooks so that you know how to handle them on your own. I think the idea of riding with clubs sound fun, but at least in my area that's something you have to have your own horse for, so don't be discouraged if those avenues aren't open to you immediately.
StephaniHren is offline  
post #99 of 270 Old 11-03-2016, 10:31 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 110
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by LlamaPacker View Post
This is great now to read that you are figuring out ways to get involved with others who have horses! Really lots of good ideas here. For certain, if you volunteered on trails with the horse associations in our areas, several of which go out for a whole day to clear trails in late spring, coming also from the west side of the Cascades over to our side, you would definitely meet up with lots of people and probably find some that have extra horses that they need to have exercised, as others have mentioned. In our area, those horse clubs are called things like Trail Riders or Backriders Associations and you could find out from the local Forest Service offices what they are called in your area and what days in the late spring or early summer they have scheduled with the Forest Service to do the trail maintenance. Since we are on the hiking and stock-packing side of the equation, that is how I know how valuable those horsemen's associations are to all of us who use the trails and that the way I find out when the trails will be cleared is to call the Forest Service offices. So, trail-clearing won't be something you can do this late in the year, but you can be ready or be looking for them, if still interested in finding a group to join in the spring. I'll be looking forward to the stories of what ways you find to get more riding time in the winter!
Very cool and good to know. I tried doing a little looking for 'backriders' but didn't find anything useful involving horses just yet. I didn't think to contact the Forest Service - but it sounds like a good project for the Spring. Thank you for the ideas.


Quote:
Originally Posted by StephaniHren View Post
Okay, I know you said that there's no real temptation to get a horse yet, but I just want to double caution against getting to wrapped up in the idea of ownership so quickly. There's so much involved with owning your own horseóblanketing/clipping, feed, identifying health problems/lameness, proper conditioning methods, tack selection, saddle fit, continued training, etc., plus the things you wouldn't expect to have to deal with like barn politics, conflicting advice, faulty professionals... the lists go on and on, and most of it is things that you can read about, but that you don't really learn until you're confronted with them a few times.

Don't try to jump into it all too quickly, especially since you seem set on getting a more high maintenance breed of horse (there are calm OTTB's out there, for sure, but it sounds like you might be gung ho about the idea of getting something more high energy).

If you're looking to progress faster, I'd take more lessons a week (so two or three times a week, or more!) and then eventually look at the idea of leasing (through your lesson program, if possible) when you're at the point where you can walk/trot/canter without supervision and you've experienced at least a couple of spooks so that you know how to handle them on your own. I think the idea of riding with clubs sound fun, but at least in my area that's something you have to have your own horse for, so don't be discouraged if those avenues aren't open to you immediately.

Oh trust me, I agree - for all the reasons you've listed and actually several more besides. I'm not even really at the point of trying to sketch out a roadmap or timeline for such a thing. Overall I still stick by my original statement that I don't want to own a horse I'm not ready for and leave that as my guiding principle. To make it a little more personal: the idea of getting my dream horse and the flatly ruining or hurting them due to my own lack of skill would be really freaking tragic - not to mention my own safety. "Ruin" in this context could be as mild as buying a horse with dressage training and screwing it all up because I'm not accurate enough with the cues. There's no point doing something wasteful like that. As you mentioned: this is even more of a factor because I'm not exactly looking at the absolute easiest of starting points.

Let's be real here: I'm working on posting trot and I'm not yet at a point where I'd feel comfortable riding my own lesson horse unsupervised in the open. I'm also not over the new-shiny-glow of the fact this is a new and interesting activity. As I said: the idea of me actually doing this at this point is absurd enough to be funny.

I start bi-weekly lessons this week. I actually don't think I can lease through this lesson program - though I do plan to ask, especially once we go into the winter-barn and therefore have an indoor arena. If that doesn't work out I have a back-up stable which does leasing specifically aimed at people looking to improve basic riding skills which, once I am comfortable enough, I am hoping to look into doing a quarter-lease (4 hours a week to practice) at. I'm also really excited about the prospect of learning a bit more about horse care via volunteering at the shelter - but we'll see how that goes.

I'm not putting timelines on anything because this needs to be driven by where I am at skill-wise and evaluated honestly with such in mind. That said, my most ambitious and crazy idea right now is that if everything goes brilliantly and I come along as a student at a very rapid pace then perhaps looking at a half-lease sometime next summer of a sort where I could take the horse off-site trail riding (maybe even to that hunt trail-riding) might not be entirely absurd. As I've mentioned repeatedly I have no idea if that's at all realistic - but if you want an insight into my mind that's my crazy ambition right now - and it's not one I intend to follow through on unless I am certain I really am up to the task.

Believe it or not, contrary to how I may sometimes come off - I really do possess a well-developed self-preservation instinct and I'm not actually terribly prone to crazy and rash actions. I am however prone to setting high goals for myself and being rather driven. I also tend to funnel my excitement towards things into concrete steps that might make those things more likely to happen. Ideally I like to get out well ahead of anything I might actually do so that when I get around to trying it out I am more likely to be successful. This means I've prepared for a lot of things that have never come to pass - but I feel the experience usually leaves me enriched as a person, so I see this as a benefit rather than a flaw.

It's in that context that I'm starting to research and learn.
gottatrot likes this.
Cammey is offline  
post #100 of 270 Old 11-04-2016, 02:00 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 46,605
• Horses: 2
your excitement reminds me of how greedy and excited I get when I go to an art supply store; I am all into buying this or that new materials, for trying new techniques, new papers, new paints, new brushes, .. . etc. I just LOVE the gear and the dream.

and then, it sits and takes up space in my room. it takes me forever to actually use them, and what I really need is to just draw, draw and draw. quantity over quality, for a while.
Whinnie, StephaniHren and Cammey like this.
tinyliny is offline  
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Adult Male Beginner: intro and looking for opinions mn2132 New Member Introductions 45 05-29-2012 10:10 AM
Beginner adult male rider.. mind Horse Riding & Horse Activity 141 04-18-2012 09:37 PM
1st show for beginner adult - what to expect? MsKibibi Horse Shows 13 04-13-2012 07:50 PM
Lacey's Journal (aka the trials and tribulations of a loved old lady) Wallaby Member Journals 20 09-02-2010 12:09 AM
Pinto Pony Team Extreme, the trials and tribulations Pinto Pony Member Journals 98 11-12-2009 08:21 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome