Trotters, Arabians, Donkeys and Other People - Page 210 - The Horse Forum
 8399Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #2091 of 2159 Old 07-11-2019, 05:32 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,062
• Horses: 3
Monkey Rock Car Park To Lights Beach - Bibbulmun Track

I last did this track section in late 2007 and can't remember whether I did it with my colleague at the time Sharon, the mad keen walker who climbed Mt Kilimanjaro soon after, or with Brett, who has no memory of it. I certainly have no memory of Lights Beach itself, but I do of the track, so I think I must have done that with Sharon, as part of a circuit that is marked on my trail map with a date on it. I remember that the roads part of the circuit was rather dull, and so we decided to simply walk in and back out on the Bibbulmun track, whose dune traverses provide some lovely fitness work for us that's invigorating rather than exhausting at this stage of post-flu exercise.

The Bibbulmun Track is a famous walking track that stretches over 600km from Perth to Albany, the long way around, mostly through natural areas. We often walk local sections of the track. The Monkey Rock car park to Lights Beach section is around 8km return and begins with a stile, crossing into private farmland:



Pretty soon, you're in the bushland:



This bit of bush is private remnant vegetation, like we have on our place.









At this stage, we took a wrong turn and ended up walking some distance along the firebreak track of the property hosting this section of the Bibbulmun Track, and by the time we realised it, we'd made the total walking distance for this part of our outing closer to 10km than 8km. Soon, though, we were back on the proper track, and crossed another stile leaving the property to get into the primary dunes:



You can see why the things I am wearing are called camouflage pants - they actually do that... I buy these things because they have enough pockets, are comfortable for walking and working in, made of natural materials instead of synthetics, cost less than half of what walking pants cost, and are actually long enough for me with their unisex design. I've previously bought them in green, but when my last green ones wore out recently, I replaced them with patterned pants for a change.

The views towards William Bay National Park:



Our happy dog waiting to see if we are coming:



Brett on a track section overlooking the coast:



The sealed track is a new bicycle track that runs 14km return to the Denmark Wind Farm - we've bookmarked that for another day, with bicycles and dog...

Typical South Coast surf:



This is a little cove in Lights Beach - have you ever seen anything more perfect?





Lights Beach has its own car park, so in summer we aim to come back and just do the long beach walk along the coast here, when the weather is too hot inland for walking...

SueC is time travelling.
SueC is online now  
post #2092 of 2159 Old 07-11-2019, 05:45 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,062
• Horses: 3
It's a really amazing place...



We live in such a beautiful part of the world and are making a renewed effort to go on a nice walk "away" and out of our usual repertoire once a week.





This was a lovely, warm, sheltered spot to have some fruit and iced coffee before exploring the beach:



Brett photographed some bluebottles:





The far end of the beach had a nice "seat":





Then it was time to head back. The dog is usually ahead of us on walks, asking, "Are you coming or what?"



A shot back towards the lovely little cove from the high dunes:



...and the views back towards Denmark on the return walk...



It was a fabulous day out - and it feels wonderful to be able to use our bodies properly again!

SueC is time travelling.
SueC is online now  
post #2093 of 2159 Old 07-12-2019, 01:51 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 2,427
• Horses: 4
Wow!! The pictures and experience look absolutely amazing!! You guys go on some great adventures!!
DanteDressageNerd is offline  
post #2094 of 2159 Old 07-16-2019, 09:42 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 2,432
• Horses: 0
Hope you didnít break yourself on a hike!

Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaamís Donkey
Knave is offline  
post #2095 of 2159 Old 07-17-2019, 12:02 AM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,062
• Horses: 3
It's a sunny day and I'm getting through my to-do list, but I did want to stop a moment today to remember Arjen Ryder.

Five years ago today, a passenger plane was shot down over the Ukraine, and Arjen was on board that plane. He and his wife were on their way back to Australia after holidaying in their native Holland. I learnt what had happened from our neighbour Noel on a fine sunny morning like this one, the day after. Noel and Robyn used to live in the Wellstead district, which is where Arjen was really well-known amongst the farming community because he was the person who was monitoring all the groundwater information (levels, salinity) at the many bores in the area, as part of a Department of Agriculture ongoing study. He'd been doing this for over 25 years, and I personally knew him because he was one of five colleagues with whom I shared a demountable office building out the back of Albany's Department of Agriculture in 1994/95, as part of the sustainable land management research team which also included a Persian hydrologist, Ruhi Ferdowsian, who together with Arjen was one of the nicest human beings I have ever worked with. Those two, and several others in that office, kind of gave me the wrong impression of what workplaces are normally like, on my first science job out of university - they set the standard so high that few other workplaces measured up to my first one, afterwards.

Coincidentally, Brett and I have not been on a passenger aircraft since this happened - I've been up in Noel's home-bake light aircraft, but we've not flown out of an airport since, because buying this farm in 2010 kept us really busy with setting up the property, planting trees and building a house and outbuildings, for quite a few years. Even now, it's hard to get spare time or cash to get away, but we're aiming to fly out to Tasmania next Easter for some hiking and camping, with a farm-sitter looking after the place, for our first holiday away since 2009. So, that's something we are looking forward to. But, flying in an airliner will be tinged with horror ever after for me.

When Arjen was shot down, many people here were devastated - he was well known and liked. I had waking nightmares of sitting on a plane, being hit by a shockwave and having everything disintegrate around me, and I was so upset that something that horrific had happened to so nice a person. I was hoping that the shockwave from the missile would have meant instant loss of consciousness, but am not sure, and it's the seconds of possible realisation that haunt me. People were literally falling from the sky...

The nearest experience (not close at all, but you have to relate it to something) that I had was when my car was rear-ended seven years ago by someone doing 140km/h who "didn't see me" (in my bright yellow car on a sunny afternoon) as I had slowed to turn off the highway. The impact was like a bomb going off; glass was flying everywhere and the car was airborne, and turned mid-air to land in the opposite lane, facing in the opposite direction. While in flight, I was going, "What? What?" out loud, so there was an awareness of something amiss - I'd not realised I was about to be hit because I had focused on a semi-trailer waiting at the intersection. The moment the car came to rest, I already knew I'd been in an accident - I was pretty dazed, but I knew that much, and my next thought was, "I have to get out of here, what if another car hits me?" This wasn't the most rational thought, but it was processing the situation I was in. So when people say that the passengers on that plane that was shot down wouldn't have known anything, I am kind of sceptical - unless the shockwave from the cruise missile was enough to cause instant loss of consciousness. Experts were talking about cabin depressurisation and loss of oxygen and using statistics on that to say that there wouldn't have been more than a couple of seconds of consciousness, but I don't know about that, lack of oxygen takes up to two minutes to result in oblivion... depressurisation is another kettle of fish, but even if it was five seconds, it was less time than that between my car being impacted and me realising I'd gotten hit as I was back on the ground in the other lane facing the other way, and I can tell you that those couple of seconds stretched a long way when that was going on.

I am really sad that someone who was such a lovely colleague and who should still be walking around on our South Coast today lost his life five years ago, in such awful circumstances. I remember his children coming into the office when they were pre-schoolers and primary school students, and racing around, including a girl in a flower-print dress, in a summer long ago. His kids had all grown up, but were hit hard by what happened. Ruhi Ferdowsian was most eloquent in eulogising Arjen for the press, able to give shape to how much he had meant to so many people, and why. Arjen's son rode his father's roadbike in the cycle leg of the next Blackwood Marathon on his behalf, despite not being a keen cyclist - just to honour him, and because he said his father had forever been trying to get him into something like this, and he thought it would make him smile looking down. I wasn't at the Department of Agriculture long enough to realise Arjen was a keen cyclist too (I was time trialling that year, he was doing group distance rides, so our wheels didn't cross, and we didn't talk much about sports), but now when I get on my road bike, I remember Arjen. I have some new handlebar tape sitting on the kitchen counter, in red, and will think of him when I put it on my bike. It's something we can do, to remember people fondly who deserve to be remembered, and we all loved Arjen, at the AgWA office. He was a decent, dedicated, caring person, and the world needs more people like him.



The last I'd heard from Arjen was a couple of months before his holiday, after catching up with him and Justin (who's also still there, and whose daughter played an impish role in a recent local production of Midsummer Night's Dream) on email. Arjen was happy I'd found a nice person to marry and was living on a farm, and we were all going to catch up in person over coffee sometime. This didn't happen; we ran out of time. You never think you're going to, but all of us will eventually; so if I could go back in time, I'd be arranging the coffee shop date...

SueC is time travelling.

Last edited by SueC; 07-17-2019 at 12:19 AM.
SueC is online now  
post #2096 of 2159 Old 07-17-2019, 04:58 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 2,427
• Horses: 4
That is really really sad I'm sorry for Arjen and his family for losing him in such a nightmarish fashion. That's really sad It's like a worst nightmare for that to happen, such a freak thing too. Im terribly sorry
DanteDressageNerd is offline  
post #2097 of 2159 Old 07-17-2019, 07:34 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,062
• Horses: 3
Thank you, @DanteDressageNerd . I hope you're having a nice stay in the US - have yet to catch up on people's journals!

I hope everyone is well. I've been a bit scarce on account of needing to catch up with a lot of things that fell by the wayside when we were impeded for three weeks with influenza, and some of these items are a bit hard to budge! It's the sort of thing that gives smallholders headaches: For example, it was back in late April/early May that I started a drainage project around our shed and completed Stage 1; and I was ready to do Stage 2 the following week, when I got a stress fracture in my foot and couldn't do any digging and wheelbarrowing until that had healed up. So in late June, I finally got back to that, and Brett and I dug the ditch for Stage 2 one afternoon. The pipes are sitting there ready to be slotted and go in the ditch, but it rained for a week and that's not a good time to work with pipes. So then on the next sunny day when you're doing something else on your to-do list that urgently needs doing, you're also looking at the pipes sitting there and hoping to get around to them sometime that day and then your other jobs stretch, and it's still undone at the end of the day, which gets frustrating. It's like The Curse of the Unfinished Drainage Pipes. And then there's fencing repairs also queueing, and even pruning in the garden. I need a TARDIS, not for international travel in this instance, but so I can fit five days' worth of work into one, and finally be caught up. But, I'm going to be scarce until all that stuff is done.

I did read in interesting article in The Guardian that says endless to-do lists are demoralising, and that you should choose just three things for your to-do list, by priority, and work on those, and not add anything else to your list until these three tasks are done. Then you start with another three-task list, and so on. I've been trying that out, and it ties in well with the "three main tasks a day, everything else is a bonus" technique Brett introduced to me - three things are usually doable, and then you don't feel demoralised by things remaining on your list, plus if you get the three things out of the way, you feel ahead when you start jumping into "extra" tasks after that! So, slowly and surely, things are getting done - the tree planting this year has been excellent, for instance, and the food garden is OK, and all the horse and donkey feet are trimmed, and the house is in good order in general.

Basically, there are many maintenance tasks that just get you back to square one, so things look the same as they did before - and 90% of my work time outdoors seems to be taken up with those. The "new work" category gets a back seat, but the tree planting has been fabulous, for instance, because it's something that's changing and you can watch grow after you've done it. Whereas a repaired fence is just a repaired fence! At least with permaculture techniques, tasks are rarely isolated, e.g. when I mow the lawn (when my eager four-legged helpers don't beat me to it), or prune things, it's not just something that makes the garden look tidy, but the clippings go back in the cycle via our compost bin, to produce organic fertiliser for our food garden. Also, the mower is battery-powered, and therefore runs off our solar panels, and not fossil fuels.

I have been following @knightrider 's advice to ride when the time is best for riding, and not at the end of the day as a reward that I may then be too tired to take up. So, I've been riding every second day generally, excepting winter deluges, and always at the best time of day, when it's warm and sunny. While I've not been on a "big" ride since the plantation ride documented a couple of weeks ago, we potter around on the on-farm and neighbour's tracks and it keeps the horse, the dog and me entertained, and exercised to a baseline level.

There were some things I didn't respond to earlier, which I will now:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knave View Post
I like when the trail goes through the tall trees! You must feel special riding through that. I think I would feel like an explorer, which is odd with the great road, but you know... Iím a little odd.
Well, I'm a bit odd too, because I do actually feel a bit like an explorer riding through places like that! Next time I go out into the plantation, I shall take the loop that goes past the old defunct dairy, and take photos to share. That will feel a little like archaeology actually, because the building is roofless and collapsing...


Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
I love the yawning! Hilarious.
It works with my dog too. And sneezing! I've been mock-sneezing when she's been sneezing, and now if I mock-sneeze, it can set her off sneezing!


Quote:
Originally Posted by DanteDressageNerd View Post
Wow!! The pictures and experience look absolutely amazing!! You guys go on some great adventures!!
Thank you. I always ooh and aah over your travel photos too! There's some beautiful places in the world, and a lot of them are nearby, if we have eyes for it. We decided to make time again. I'll have some pictures of Middleton Beach and Emu Point soon, we went on a nice afternoon walk there yesterday after Brett's work, because it was his birthday, and today we are about to embark on a climb of Mt Magog in the Stirling Ranges, for the same reason! Photos will be taken. That part of the Stirlings is Lord of The Rings country!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Knave View Post
Hope you didnít break yourself on a hike!
No, I tend to break myself between hikes!


Wishing everyone a wonderful evening / day!

SueC is time travelling.
SueC is online now  
post #2098 of 2159 Old 07-17-2019, 08:15 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Toledo, Spain
Posts: 1,130
• Horses: 0
I like the 3 daily goals idea. It would make things more manageable, wouldn't it? I should give it a whirl.

Actually, it reminds me of the theory for feeding older babies and toddlers: if you put a full plate of food in front of them, they get overwhelmed and sometimes refuse to eat, play with their food or knock it to the floor; but, if you put just a few pieces of food on their tray, they'll usually gobble it up and ask for more!

So does that just make us big babies?
Spanish Rider is offline  
post #2099 of 2159 Old 07-17-2019, 09:17 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 2,432
• Horses: 0
I really like that idea too. I may give it a go for a couple weeks and see what I think.

Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaamís Donkey
Knave is offline  
post #2100 of 2159 Old 07-20-2019, 06:49 AM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,062
• Horses: 3
This is the article I mentioned: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...liver-burkeman

@Spanish Rider , the difference between us and big babies is that we have to be our own parents! Make ourselves go to bed on time, exercise, eat our vegetables, have good manners, get our work done, get down time etc.

I remember a song lyric on this from the 1990s - "I'm still a child, but now no-one tells me no."

For you, @Knave and anyone else trying to improve their productivity and reduce their stress about the never-ending pile, here's two more useful ones on to-do lists and human behaviour:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...-ordered-tasks

https://www.theguardian.com/science/...ning-your-life

Three different angles, all of them interesting. Wishing everyone here lots of energy, and a good work-life balance!
knightrider and Knave like this.

SueC is time travelling.
SueC is online now  
Reply

Tags
donkeys , free-ranging horses , french trotters , life & the universe , riding standardbreds

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking up arabians and half arabians on data source! Twilight Arabians Horse Breeds 48 11-17-2013 08:21 PM
Arabians & Half-Arabians in Florida? RunRideNDive Horse Breeds 1 10-16-2012 04:48 PM
Come watch the Arabians and Half-Arabians compete at Dressage at Lexington July 13-15 HGEsquire Horse Shows 8 07-06-2012 07:12 PM
Introducing my Herd of Arabians and Half Arabians :) Spirit Thyme Horse Pictures 51 09-25-2010 11:52 PM
People with Arabians: What saddle do you use and like? Wallaby Horse Tack and Equipment 4 05-27-2009 12:05 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome