Trotters, Arabians, Donkeys and Other People - Page 223 - The Horse Forum
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post #2221 of 2255 Old 09-16-2019, 03:17 PM
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@SueC Bit late with my answer, went missing for the weekend to visit my mother and her fat little pony, but I do think there will be a digital download available for purchase. I think that was one of the options when we were running the kickstarter initially to fund the printing of it. Their last couple of albums were made available for listening on Spotify, hopefully that will be the case for this one as well :)

Lovely photos of the hike and mountains as usual! Very different from the rolling, tree-covered foothills here.

"She could be a witch, and he would never build a pyre upon which to burn her thoughts, desires and dreams."
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post #2222 of 2255 Old 09-16-2019, 09:30 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caledonian View Post
@SueC - Many thanks for the information. I love how descriptive their names are for the mountains - 'drizzle carrier' and 'flirtation'. They've a very interesting culture; how much of it has survived? Especially in areas such as marriage and courtship, which was an eye-opener to say the least. There's a huge difference in the way the Aboriginals and Europeans treated the land - sheep farming, sandalwood and beekeeping (running over the hives!). Do the tribes still have a connection with the area?
Tha fŗilte mhÚr ort, @Caledonian !

It depends on the area, and how much the local populations were displaced. The loss of connection and traditions is worst in city and agricultural areas; it's really sad to see that there, a lot of young indigenous people are aping African-American rap culture. Schools are making an increasing effort to teach Aboriginal cultural awareness and to at least show a little of the languages and customs; and in schools with a significant indigenous population, this tends to be more expansive, which then benefits everyone attending.

We finally had the apology back in 2007 - the then-PM Kevin Rudd stood up an apologised on behalf of the Australian government for all the injustices that had historically been done to indigenous people, and that were still being perpetuated in more subtle ways. There were so many tears that day, from the indigenous people attending and from supporters of all types of cultural backgrounds. I cried watching the transmission on TV - this had been so long overdue. It's so necessary and so powerful for people to say, "What we did was wrong and we're so sorry for your pain and all the consequences for you." This pain and these consequences is multi-generation, as it also often is for survivors of more private types of violence and injustice.

In the region where we live, the indigenous population is a tiny minority, and tend to live in clusters in the suburbs. On the farm, we and some of our neighbours sometimes get approached by local indigenous people from the suburbs about whether we would let them hunt kangaroos on the land we "own" (my emphasis) and are currently stewarding, and we have always said yes, and tried to get to know them better. One of the "uncles" in their group is pretty connected to the land still, and sort of mentors them with their hunting, which these days they do with a gun, but we've seen them still do the on-foot flushing out of game which is traditional. There are no effective predators of the kangaroo left in this area, other than humans, and we do need to control the population excesses, and to my mind, who better to do this than the descendants of the traditional owners? Unlike a lot of white people, they hunt to eat. Kangaroo is very like venison, and it is such a shame to see most of it get used for pet food.

Away from the cities and intensive agriculture areas, there are still indigenous people with huge connection to land and traditions. So, in the Northern Territory, for example. The other day I was digging around for music and found the YouTube clip for a song I really loved when I heard it on the radio in the 1990s, by Yothu Yindi, a band that was formed from the merging of a white rock/folk band, and a group of indigenous musicians and dancers. They were very much proponents of reconciliation, and acknowledging the good aspects of both cultures, and of wearing indigenous traditions with pride. Here's their hugely feel-good song World Turning:


They make such great clips too.

Several remixes were done, and this was considered the "grooviest" by some people - it's also how I first heard it:



...I can't make up my mind which I like best - I love all of them!

Sadly, the singer of this band died a while ago, only in his 50s, from kidney failure - as is the case for a lot of indigenous people; they are terribly susceptible to diabetes because they have ultra-efficient hunter-gatherer metabolisms that survived over 60,000 years of living off some very difficult and ancient country; European foods, alcohol and comparative inactivity just kill these people so quickly - diabetes is an overall epidemic in Australia, but nowhere worse than with indigenous people, who are like canaries in the coalmine for our Western bad habits. Alcohol addiction is also especially bad amongst these people; it didn't help the singer any with his health that he had a self-reported consumption of between 1 and 4 cartons of beer daily for many years, until he went in for treatment. It's especially sad because he was really educated, was a school principal in his local area and did so much fantastic stuff for indigenous pride in culture, and reconciliation, so effectively and for so long, and had so much to live for and be proud of, and still succumbed to this awful alcohol addiction.

More on this wonderful band here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yothu_Yindi


Quote:
I'm not an expert, but i'd say that most Scots Gaelic speakers can understand each other, despite some differences between the Islands, mainland and Canada. We'd a lot of dialects but theyíre dying out, some are long gone. They say itís due to the use of a standardised version in classrooms, media and certain amount of anglicisation in the way itís spoken.
Oh, so there's attrition / loss with Gaelic as well? That's a shame... it's such a beautiful language (both Scots and Irish), the sounds and inflections are so lovely that I was drawn to music in these languages early, and from then on of course wanted to know what the words meant! :) I am glad that the language and traditions are being kept alive in very meaningful ways, and that many people are passionate about that!

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post #2223 of 2255 Old 09-16-2019, 10:25 PM
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That is interesting. The natives here also struggle with diabetes and alcohol. It is sad when you think of the canaries as a visual.
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Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaamís Donkey
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post #2224 of 2255 Old 09-16-2019, 11:05 PM Thread Starter
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@Knave , it's very sad when people are blamed for the very things that their colonisers introduced them to, and that the white people themselves have plenty of trouble with here - binge drinking is also an all-Australian epidemic, including at school leaver levels, where getting legless seems to be a rite of passage to adulthood for many young people. I've never been a particularly peer-pressure-influenced type; if anything, I'd go the other way when I saw groups of people do things that looked stupid and dangerous from the outside. I do think it's easier not to fall into these things if you're an outsider, reflecting type.

The colour of those roads and car parks is from iron compounds in the local rocks (ferruginous bedrock) - these get crushed to make gravel for road bases. Granite "bluemetal" is used in the top mix when roads are sealed, but most of our local unsealed roads are bright orange - a few near the coast are done with crushed limestone, and are cream / white.

And congratulations again!

@CopperLove , looking forward to a link when it happens! Hope you had a fun time away. I'll keep our hikes coming - got another batch to process from the weekend just now, of an estuarine walk. I also love seeing people's landscape photos on this forum - it's like windows into other parts of the world - and delivered in my favourite way, by on-the-ground people not involved in big media!

@Caledonian , just in postscript, I was lucky to have a really excellent English teacher in Year 11/12 who was very aware both of what had gone on in this world internationally, and what was often going on on a more personal level, and he made sure we were exposed to some superb texts covering very important things. On the subject of Australian history, which at the time, in the mid-to-late 80s, was still being taught as, "Captain Cook discovered Australia" - it was great to have some real education not yet mainstream on the curriculum. With the name of Simon Fraser Macphail, you can guess his heritage. Anyway, we read a book called The Fatal Impact as part of our non-fiction reading in Year 11, which was all about the "discovery" of the South Pacific, Oceania etc. It's concise and very readable and illustrated, and a bit antiquated now, but still really good: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...e_Fatal_Impact

He never preached to us, just exposed us to different points of view, and encouraged us to think for ourselves. It's unfortunate that he disappeared off the radar when he moved to the Northern Territory in the late 80s; he's probably dead now and I would have loved to have told him as an adult looking back how much of a positive impact he had on my life, and how he was one of the teachers who inspired me to go work in education, and whose teaching methods very much influenced mine.


Last night I had another ride; I hesitate to say I rode a horse, because it felt like I was riding a giant furball. The Cushings treatment did curtail Sunsmart's winter coat compared to last year - he wasn't a yak - but just as he started to shed, paradoxically his existing hair also grew longer - normally hair enters a resting phase when it's at programmed length, before falling out. His hair growth is re-activated at the moment, and he's so fluffy, and has long long hair hanging all down his belly and legs - that's why I've not taken that backside photo of him yet, @Knave , because you can hardly see anything for the knickerbockers he appears to be wearing! There's nice, short, shiny, black summer coat coming through on his face at the moment, and I hope all this hairiness will be done a month from now... Anyway, the furball and I went sight-seeing and had a pleasant time in the evening.

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post #2225 of 2255 Old 09-26-2019, 08:13 PM Thread Starter
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NULLAKI PENINSULA WALK: BIBBULMUN / EDEN ROAD INTERSECTION TO TRACK HUT NEAR PELICAN POINT

I meant to post this the week we actually did it - part of a conscious foray into sections of the famous Bibbulmun track we've not actually walked before. There's four sections like this in particular we want to walk; this is the first one done and we're aiming at another on the weekend. We've also climbed Bluff Knoll meanwhile and I hope to get that one up really quickly so I'm caught up!



This is Brett near the Eden Road / Bibbulmun intersection at the start of our walk:



The Wilson Inlet from its southern shore, at very high tide, so no cute little beaches:



Part of the track goes parallel to Eden Road...



From here, we could see our destination, Pelican Point, which is the second, far finger sticking out into the Inlet on this photo:



Cute little footbridges for stream crossings...



At Eden Gate, we made use of the picnic table and had lunch. You can see the (automatic) gate behind us - as you go through it, you enter a fenced conservation area in which fox and cat populations get kept low through baiting and exclusion. The near-absence of these non-native predators has helped endangered little native mammals to flourish on this peninsula. The last photo of this set of posts shows a map so you can see where the gated exclusion fence is and how together with the water on the other three sides, this helps limit migration of feral predators back into that area. It's a unique conservation area because it includes a lot of private property where landowners have agreed to participate in the project. All their dogs are safely fenced into gardens so they don't access the area unsupervised, and most don't have cats - and certainly, nobody has roaming cats - the baits alone make sure of that. Because of the baiting, we kept our dog on a leash for most of this section of the walk.



After lunch, we did extended shoreside walking. It was good to see that there was far less weed invasion on this stretch of track - compare with the footbridge photo - all that bright green stuff is kikuyu, an invasive African grass and a local pasture mainstay. Australian native vegetation tends to be grey-green or blue-green, not bright grass green, so you can usually do a quick preliminary assessment of the state of weed invasion in the local flora by colour.





A number of jetties exist along that shore, and make nice vantage points.





Brett decided he was a pirate:



There was a lovely gnarly tree by the shore...




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post #2226 of 2255 Old 09-26-2019, 08:41 PM Thread Starter
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Our dog enjoyed some retrieving...



This is the track shelter hut for this section and our destination point; you can see it on the map (last photo). The hut is near the erstwhile water taxi drop-off point to take walkers from Denmark across to the Nullaki Peninsula - sometimes walkers can cross the sand bar at the mouth of the Wilson Inlet, but it's seasonal, so this was an alternative crossing. I say was, because regulations have made it uneconomical for anyone to run the service, so now, this track section is mostly abandoned (except by local walkers), and the long-haul Perth to Albany walkers tend to get road taxis from Denmark to Eden Road to rejoin the track... another sad example of how regulations have killed what was once a really memorable part of the Bubbulmun experience - the water crossing by boat.



We went a little past the hut to see if we could spot the erstwhile boat landing place, but everything was overgrown. It was hot and humid, despite appearance in the photos, so we decided 8km was far enough to walk one way, and headed back - the 16km total took us around 4 hours, including lunch. Another time, we might park at Eden Gate picnic area and walk in from there, and go further around to the sand bar, maybe returning along one of the many other internal tracks.

On the way back, Brett got his macro camera out and took wildflower / botanical photos. If you want to know what they are, just click on them and it will take you back to Flickr, where you can see that information in the titles.

























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post #2227 of 2255 Old 09-26-2019, 08:42 PM Thread Starter
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Lastly, the map - we walked from the T where the Bibbulmun track (yellow, black dots) crossed Eden Road, to the hut (black square west of Pelican Point) and back. Lots of other trails exist here for future walks, but we're going south from the T next time we drive out to the Nullaki. This weekend, we want to do a walk in Denmark instead, which you can also see on this map: Denmark townsite to Poddy Point and back - we've done the Bibbulmun sections further on before: Near Poddy Point is the parking for the Mt Hallowell section we did recently, and you can just see the track going up the contours.


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post #2228 of 2255 Old 09-27-2019, 07:54 PM
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Wow, those flower photos are brilliant! Of course, all the photos are lovely!

Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaamís Donkey
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post #2229 of 2255 Old 10-03-2019, 01:21 AM Thread Starter
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Hello all! I hope everyone is well and enjoying their Northern autumn. I am so busy with spring planting I barely have time to scratch myself, and am spending evenings writing for other projects, reading etc. So I've been scarce, and will be a bit scarce until everything's in the ground and summer gets going properly.

I read something the other day where I thought, "Oh, this might interest @bsms !" and so I scanned it in and here it is:







Happy riding, reading, getting projects done to everyone!

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post #2230 of 2255 Old 10-03-2019, 08:42 AM
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It sounds like a good kind of busy at least! Springtime is so lovely to me.

Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaamís Donkey
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