Trotters, Arabians, Donkeys and Other People - Page 251 - The Horse Forum
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post #2501 of 2600 Old 03-14-2020, 02:34 PM
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Nope, none on ebay that I've found so far. Interestingly enough, the shipping restrictions on the REI website state that the Deuter bags can only be shipped within the US. So maybe it's a sign. I think I've almost decided on that bag even though it's a bit more than I planned on spending. I've watched some videos on it now since the website doesn't give good photos of the interior, and I'm kind of in love. It won't affect my buying decision, because in the end it really doesn't matter, but I am a little upset that they don't offer a wider variety of colors. I loved the bright Red Dahlia color available in the Mountain Designs bag and the deeper red available in some of the Osprey bags. A lot of the women's body specific designs don't come in red... don't they realize women want red too? (The REI website also offers a good return policy as far as I can tell, so much like a good saddle fitting, if I load it up and try it and it just doesn't fit my back, I can return it )

I'm quite jealous of the Australian beaches, I'm sure you hear that a lot on HF. I'd never been to a beach and seen the ocean until just last year. I literally gasped when I saw your photo of what you call a Bluebottle. I've always read them referred to as a "Man O' War", and about how dangerous they can be in the water because of how long their tentacles/stingers are. I never realized they were so beautiful up close in an other-worldly kind of way.

"I am the one thing in life I can control. I am inimitable I am an original. Im not falling behind or running late. Im not standing still I am lying in wait." - Wait For It
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post #2502 of 2600 Old 03-16-2020, 06:04 AM
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Just curious about your opinion because of things you have posted in the past.
I didn't want to get too controversial on the Covid threads. However, have there been any discussions out there about how many of us are concerned with the world's overpopulation, and that pandemics and other natural disasters may be necessary in order to keep the numbers more sustainable? Of course people are concerned about their loved ones, but taking more of a larger/non personal view. Could things like pandemics actually be a positive thing for the natural world?
What do you think?
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post #2503 of 2600 Old 03-16-2020, 08:46 AM Thread Starter
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Well, in the absence of people using their brains to limit their overbreeding (and overconsumption), I think that's right, @gottatrot - just as every time there is a war etc. But I like none of these things, and I wish we could just be sensible, and not require wars (usually over resource conflicts) and epidemics to limit what we should be limiting ourselves, and have the means to limit ourselves. Unfortunately, in that respect, most humans behave exactly like bacteria.

I actually just logged on to ask you something! You've got a horse with Cushings and have done a lot of reading on it. Does, or did, your mare ever have weepy eyes because of it? Sunsmart has little trails of fluid a couple of inches down his face these past couple of months. It's also windy and some of the cattle have the same, and one of the donkeys, but he's never had that before and I wondered if it could be related to his Cushings, or whether it's a separate thing. Apparently one of the possible reasons for this in livestock is cobalt deficiency, but he should have plenty of cobalt through his daily mineral mix, unless the Cushings is somehow affecting his trace nutrient balance, or unless it's something unrelated to either of these things.

Also, did your mare's coat ever become near-normal again after you started treating with Pergolide?

And to what extent if any did she lose her topline?

Sunsmart has, for the first time in his life, become ribby over summer, and is losing topline. He still has plenty of hindquarter and shoulder muscles etc and rides really well most of the time, but he was always a good doer and it's the first time I've actually increased his feed other than to compensate for fitness training, long rides etc. His teeth are due to be done (appointment already arranged) and he actually has some gum issues too for the first time in his life, which I also wonder about in terms of possible relationship to Cushings. Romeo lost teeth in his old age, but never had gum problems!

I will be quizzing my vet at the dental appointment, but would also really value any thoughts you have on this, and I'm sure you've read reams of stuff on equine Cushings...


@CopperLove , what a shame you can't get that pack in your preferred colour! But, you're very creative, so why not stencil some cherry red design onto it with a suitable fabric paint that will bond to the material and not wash off in the wet? Or alternatively, apply cherry red stickers, maybe of cherries? Or glue bits of red fabric designs on? (I think stitching them on would ruin the waterproofing.) Then you'd have a truly unique, personalised hiking pack!

You live on such a big continent that it's quite possible to be nowhere near the ocean! It was like that for me in Europe. I saw mountains and lakes, but didn't see the ocean until my family went for a car trip along the French Mediterranean when I was about 10. That was nice, but the beaches on the South Coast of Western Australia are far and away stunning compared to what I saw then! I love the seascapes down here.

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post #2504 of 2600 Old 03-16-2020, 09:11 AM
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As always, I like to hear your opinions, thanks! Probably I take a too dim view of the world but due to the rats in a maze experiments I feel that with excess population, if there is not disease it will be violence, and as a health care worker I lean toward choosing death by disease.

That's interesting, my mare does get weepy eyes in the summer. I have never attributed it to her Cushing's. One thing I noticed though was that she had sweet itch that was gradually getting better each year (I think her immune system was depressed by the high cortisol levels from Cushing's), but when I started her on the Prascend the sweet itch was worse again. So I've thought the clear fluid draining from her eyes in the summer was probably from an allergy. But also it gets windy here, she lives up on a hill, and her eyes protrude more than other horse eyes.

Amore looked like she was beginning to lose muscling along her topline at the beginning before I started her on the Prascend. That reversed as soon as I started the medication, and although she has a slight pot belly it is not really worse than it has been her whole life.
Her coat has not really improved on the medication, but it basically has stayed the same and not worsened. She gets only slightly more than a horse with a heavy winter coat would get, not quite as much as an Icelandic horse. She sheds late but she does shed out completely each year. About 4-6 weeks after all the other horses.

We have been fighting a small amount of white line disease this year, which I attribute to her Cushing's, but Nala had a bad case of it too and the sand they are always on is really bad for getting the organisms inside even the tiniest hoof crack.
She has not had gum problems, and keeps her weight but her teeth are short due to being 29. The only issue I've had is needing to soak her vitamin pellets or they ball up in her esophogus and get stuck.

I made a video yesterday that I will post online in a couple days, it shows Amore's coat and condition pretty well. She's in full winter coat right now. She feels great, and when I called her yesterday she galloped the whole length of the field rather than canter sedately in like an old lady.
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post #2505 of 2600 Old 03-18-2020, 02:31 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you very much for that information, @gottatrot ! It's good to have a "comparison horse" for this.

Re topline, I am wondering whether my horse is going to need an increase in Prascend from half a tablet to a full tablet daily - or possibly, it's a dental issue at the moment (he may be running an abscess somewhere). I will keep you posted and let you know what the vet thinks, but unfortunately they can't come until the 30th for the dental visit. Sunsmart will get his teeth done, as well as Sparkle and Nelly, who I decided would benefit most from dentals. The rest can be done later, as there aren't any obvious problems and they're all in good condition. Costs of dentals have more than doubled because they're now insisting on sedating every animal, even though they're restrained in a mobile crush - and there's nobody left who will do the old manual dental file and gag thing either, and that was much more affordable. The sedation alone costs what a complete dental used to cost with the old technique - $80 per animal for drugs alone.

By the way, what are the policies at your workplace about staff illness at this point in time? In the practice Brett works at, everyone on staff, doctors included, has been told to stay home if they have even just a sore throat, so Brett is home today; should be fine by Friday (Thursday is his off day anyway). We've both got a bit of a sore throat and are therefore mostly resting up today, eating well, hydrating etc.

I am interested in any opinions on the whole situation that you may not have aired in the general space! What precautions are you taking, for example? And how's the Oregon toilet paper situation - has that insanity come to your part of the world too?
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post #2506 of 2600 Old 03-18-2020, 03:15 AM Thread Starter
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FARM UPDATE: CATTLE DROVING

Last week we sold some cattle. This meant droving three over-600kg steers along the road for the 2km trip to the neighbours' cattle yard, and it's a bitumen road with things like milk trucks coming by occasionally.

We actually had four steers in that lot. The fourth one couldn't go because he hurt his foot / shoulder (unclear which; nothing broken, no infection, no swelling) and therefore can't be transported. He's been limping six weeks without getting worse or better, so he's staying with the three little steers and we'll give him another month to see if he's going to come good. If not, we're going to have to eat him ourselves, because he can't go on a truck like this. Occasionally cattle here will injure themselves playing or running down a dam wall; it's only the second time in ten years we've had a lame cow. The first one eventually recovered, but it's not like you can catch them and give them a sports massage or an icepack or anything!

Getting cattle to the neighbours' place is always a bit of a rodeo / fitness run. We actually do this with our bicycles, because cows run faster than us and we need to be able to keep up with them so we don't lose them somewhere (and we can't take horses or the dog safely on the public road for this, the speed limit on that road is 110 km/h and people drive like lunatics). The cattle aren't always quiet; sometimes they run like mad and we're flat out on our bikes keeping up with them. At other times they try to hop over fences or go down roads they aren't supposed to, and that part is a bit stressful, and involves a bit of drama and pushing them back the other way if necessary.


The dog with some of our past dairy steers

The last time we sold cattle, two years ago (before the drought), one of the heifers jumped clean over the fence back into our farm when they were halfway up the road, and hid in the middle of the forest for the rest of the afternoon, so we put the other six heifers back in with her, cancelled our transport to the saleyards, and tried again the following week, when we finally got all seven of them to the neighbours' yards.

Those were beef breed and a bit wild; the three we sold last week were dairy steers, brought up by humans, so they were much easier to handle. They were very leisurely most of the way. Crossing the road into the neighbours' big scary orange driveway was the big boo-hoo, it always is with groups of cattle - they've walked on bitumen for the first part of the trip, then go up to a sand track parallel to the road, and then they are supposed to cross the road later on, and you'd think they thought the orange driveway was a river full of piranhas...

Eventually they crossed over, but not until several cars had come while they were starting to go into the road and then we had to start again after collecting them from 100m further up the sand track again a couple of times... you really need three people for that - one right, one left, one behind - and we are only two, but the neighbour turned up after ten minutes of toing and froing on the road... (The neighbour has paddocks both sides of the road, and told us that years ago they had one cow that point blank refused to cross the bitumen, so this particular cow had to be trucked over the road crossing every year!)

Got good money for them - $2.58 per kg liveweight = over $1,700 per steer, when they were paying only around $1,000 for them when the market was low back in December...

We thought we'd be able to fix up our driveway from part of the proceeds, but with COVID-19 and the expected loss of our Airbnb income for a while, we may now hold off and see if the other steer comes good and can be sold along with the three yearlings. We don't normally sell yearling beef, but for the next month a high demand will exist, and it would be more economical for us to sell them early and re-stock with weanlings because of this. If we can do that, the driveway will definitely get fixed...if not, then we may have to park the car 20m from the house again on the wettest days of winter. Ah well, there are worse things in the universe.

SueC is time travelling.

Last edited by SueC; 03-18-2020 at 03:24 AM.
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post #2507 of 2600 Old 03-18-2020, 08:56 AM Thread Starter
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MONKEY ROCK - LIGHTS BEACH OUTING

Here's some photos from our outing to Denmark on Saturday. We did this hike much faster than last year - just 45 minutes to get from Monkey Rock car park to Lights Beach, and then the same time back! It seemed like a pretty short, easy walk this time, which is great, because it means we're fitter than last year (having really worked on it) - the walk is very uphill-downhill, but nothing like the uphill of Talyuberlup!

From the start of the section we did:







About halfway to Lights Beach, you can see Monkey Rock (near where we parked) in the background - those big lumps of rock partway up the big hill:



The bitumen section is actually a bicycle path - we did that one last year, on the bikes, with the dog: https://www.horseforum.com/member-jo...post1970761371



Lights Beach:





Having lunch:





Some more beach photos, especially for landlocked persons:







More photos we took of the same trail last year - when we documented more thoroughly: https://www.horseforum.com/member-jo...post1970742907

We were supposed to do Peak Head on Brett's day off tomorrow, but that is a really intense cardiovascular workout which we are going to avoid because of our sore throats - we'd rather let our bodies fight the infection. Hopefully we can do it on the weekend instead. Tomorrow, I'm hoping to be able to do the outdoors tasks I had originally planned for today - but it was raining, and we needed to take it easy... I should at least be able to go riding tomorrow.

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post #2508 of 2600 Old 03-18-2020, 11:30 AM
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Great pictures!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by SueC View Post
By the way, what are the policies at your workplace about staff illness at this point in time? In the practice Brett works at, everyone on staff, doctors included, has been told to stay home if they have even just a sore throat, so Brett is home today; should be fine by Friday (Thursday is his off day anyway). We've both got a bit of a sore throat and are therefore mostly resting up today, eating well, hydrating etc.

I am interested in any opinions on the whole situation that you may not have aired in the general space! What precautions are you taking, for example? And how's the Oregon toilet paper situation - has that insanity come to your part of the world too?
People at my work are told to stay home if they have a cough. If that clears up, they can come back to work. We've had several so far that have been off and come back already.

We already had about a week's worth of toilet paper when all of this started, thankfully, because sometimes we wait until we're nearly out. Yesterday we were driving down the coast so stopped in several places and only found TP at one place. We were allowed to take three small packages, and DH was inclined to only take one but I talked him into taking our limit since we will be out in a week and there was none in stock in our area. I've seen photos of empty shelves all around the country and in Japan also. I believe this toilet paper hoarding is global.

I understand people think they might be in quarantine. However, buying enough toilet paper for a year is ridiculous.
We have a lot of paper towels so could always use those.

Personally I think the virus is serious, but not as deadly as many diseases. We still haven't been able to test those who are not seriously sick here in the U.S., but of those who are we are getting around a 1.5% mortality rate. I think everyone being hygienic for once will help the flu and other respiratory viruses spread less, which is good.

It bothers me to see photos of patients in other countries isolated on cots without IVs or oxygen nearby and nothing sitting near them to drink. Either the people are not sick enough to need hospital care, in which case you are only going to create a problem by putting them in this scenario, or else if they really do need fluids and oxygen, they are going to get much more sick and are likely to die. I am not sure how they are organizing things but I am certain here we would have less trained people going around making sure everyone had their head raised up on pillows so they could breathe, kleenex and water next to the patient, curtains and commodes, the basics.
It makes me wonder if fear of contagious illnesses can make things much worse for people who contract them.

They say health care workers are taking this less seriously, but that's mainly because we understand how many diseases spread and it's not magical or anything, just science. Like you're not going to get the virus from eating take out food, and handling your food with gloves is silly.

The virus isn't going to spread from a person carrying it into their surroundings unless they wipe their nose or cough into their hand and touch surfaces. So the "silent carrier" is only a factor if the person has a habit of open mouth coughing when not sick or else wiping their body fluids on things around them. Children behave that way.

It's not oozing out of their pores or anything. It is also somewhat difficult to catch droplet viruses from surfaces, which is why normally for things like the flu we only wear masks around patients but not gowns and gloves. My main precaution is to never touch my mucous membranes unless I am in the safety of my own home and have already washed my hands, and I always maintain distance from people who are coughing or sneezing.

Hopefully old people are not too afraid to go out and becoming ill from not eating or not having basic care supplies.
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post #2509 of 2600 Old 03-18-2020, 12:39 PM
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My son installed a bidet for us several years ago. Glad we have it now. We had cable news available to us when we were in Monterey...24/7 news outlets spread fear and panic. I feel sooo much better when I don't have Fox News or CNN telling me breathlessly about how we are all doomed! I'll admit I'm glad to be back on my two acres with desert land nearby. My left hip is still causing some issues but it feels better when I move - so walking 2-3 miles a day out in the desert helps my body AND my soul! I understand my daughter asking that her first phrase she learned in Hebrew be "I hear the desert calling me!"

Doesn't need to be "desert" per se. We went for a short hike in the California coastal range while there...lots of people out on the trails, beautiful scenery, lots of trees. I'd LOVE to be able to go hiking where Brett & SueC have been hiking. Maybe need to save our money and take a trip to Australia in a year or two. My wife's sister lives in Melbourne. And I enjoyed a TDY to Darwin back in the 80s (although we were working 6 days a week).

But yeah, in the end, I hear the desert calling me.

PS: The folks I know from 60-85 are the LEAST worried about the virus that I know. It isn't like most of us inhabit crowded bars or nightclubs anyways. For me, age has brought a measure of fatalism anyways. Not a Calvinistic fatalism, just an understanding that I won't live forever regardless of what I do. I was in my 20s when my 75 year old aunt was diagnosed with severe cancer and given weeks to live. I was shocked that she wasn't the least bit afraid. The older I get, the more I understand.
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Last edited by bsms; 03-18-2020 at 12:47 PM.
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post #2510 of 2600 Old 03-18-2020, 02:23 PM
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Quote:
The folks I know from 60-85 are the LEAST worried about the virus that I know. It isn't like most of us inhabit crowded bars or nightclubs anyways. For me, age has brought a measure of fatalism anyways. Not a Calvinistic fatalism, just an understanding that I won't live forever regardless of what I do. I was in my 20s when my 75 year old aunt was diagnosed with severe cancer and given weeks to live. I was shocked that she wasn't the least bit afraid. The older I get, the more I understand.
This is me and I agree. I really appreciate your thoughts on things. Thank you for being you.
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