Trotters, Arabians, Donkeys and Other People - Page 44 - The Horse Forum
 8407Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #431 of 2159 Old 04-24-2018, 08:36 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vermont
Posts: 5,919
• Horses: 3
Thanks, @SueC - all systems go on the new house. The sellers have been beyond cooperative with a couple of little things that popped up in inspections, and we will formally close on the purchase on 5/18. So, less than a month now! The new house is about 90 minutes north of where we are now. The chickens will probably get moved up around 5/25 (we have someone helping us get the coop and run built since there is so much going on and we won't have time to do it ourselves), and the horses at some point in June.

That tart looks amazing by the way!

Since fall is approaching for you, here's a seasonal recipe I enjoy when brussels sprouts start coming into the farmer's market:

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/ku...ussels-sprouts

Ingredients
  • 2 pounds Brussels sprouts, halved
  • 5 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped peeled ginger
  • 2 tablespoons hot chili paste (sambal oelek)
  • 6 dried chiles de árbol, lightly crushed
  • ˝ cup soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons unseasoned rice vinegar
  • ⅓ cup unsalted, roasted peanuts
Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 425°. Toss brussels sprouts and 4 Tbsp. oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Roast, tossing once, until softened (but not soft) and browned, 20–25 minutes. Set aside.
  • Meanwhile, mix cornstarch and 1 Tbsp. water in a small bowl until smooth.
  • Heat remaining 1 Tbsp. oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high. Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring often, until garlic is golden brown, about 2 minutes. Add chili paste and cook, stirring, until darkened, about 2 minutes. Add chiles, soy sauce, sugar, vinegar, and ˝ cup water and bring to a boil; stir in cornstarch slurry. Simmer, stirring, until sauce coats spoon, about 2 minutes. Let cool slightly.
  • Toss brussels sprouts with sauce and serve topped with peanuts over steamed white or brown rice.
SueC likes this.
egrogan is offline  
post #432 of 2159 Old 04-24-2018, 09:52 AM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,067
• Horses: 3
This sounds excellent, @egrogan , and I'm going to try it! Will have to be bought sprouts because I've not managed to grow any from seed yet, although we have plenty of Tuscan and Scotch Blue Dwarf kales in the garden pretty much year around, from the Brassica family; and broccolis and cauliflowers seasonally. I'm going to persist with trying to grow it from seed though...

Good homemade food is such a great thing. We've been so pleased about finding more and more of what's on our plate coming from our own garden. We were going to have chickens but because we have bees, we're doing barter with someone who needs honey and has way too many free-range eggs from her own hens. We'll still have chickens eventually - and I love that Wyandotte wing lacing...

I said I'd do a couple of food posts and here's another:


Painted Mountain Corn – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Painted Mountain Corn Drying – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

This is a personal favourite: Heritage multi-coloured corn, bursting with antioxidants and corn-ness instead of sugar. Modern commercial eating corn varieties are simply bred for sugar content – lollies in vegetable form. This heritage variety is more like the corn originally grown by indigenous Americans. It's superb as corncobs with a bit of melted butter and salt; a great side to all sorts of things. I got the seed from a generous bunch of readers from Grass Roots, which is our version of Mother Earth - couldn't get it in our state, so they sent it to me and look how gorgeous they turned out. The dried cobs are a colour selection being kept for seed for next year’s crop and for seed sharing with other growers – apart from the pale white immature cob in the background, which we ate.

This corn is a great accompaniment to this dish:


Proper Roast Chicken – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

We went to the farmers’ market one Saturday morning to pick up some proper chickens, one for immediately, one for the freezer. You can’t get chicken like this at the supermarket: This farmer from Kojonup inland from us specialises in a slow-growing American heritage meat breed, run free range and processed on his farm. This tastes like chicken used to taste before industrial farming took over – like you can generally only get if you grow your own. These animals have actually lived, not just sat around with juvenile arthritis in an industrial setting, as modern broilers do (with skeletons unable to support oversized, fast-growing muscles).

The sides are from our vegie garden, except the carrots, which we buy for $4 a 5kg bag as juicing carrots: Roast potatoes, roast pumpkin, garden salad. Lovely Sunday lunch. When I roast a chicken, I usually put a whole lemon inside the body cavity and just rub the outside with olive oil and salt for a crispy finish.



Kitchen Snapshot I – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

This was the kitchen recently at the end of stone fruit season. Peaches ripening – we’ve had a funny season and a proportion actually fell off before losing their green tinge. Tomatoes ready for use, and a big bucket of greens for a vegetable soup.

And we've got so many pumpkins:


Kitchen Snapshot II – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

Turks Turban harvest came over a month early this year. They are as decorative as they are delicious in soups, or roasted in wedges.


Harvest Table – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australiac
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

Autumn provides lovely produce that can be decorative on any table. Here we have, from the left, bright orange Potimarron pumpkins, a mixture of Tromboncino and Dutch Crookneck pumpkins in the background, young Tromboncino zucchini (dual-purpose variety) in the foreground, and Painted Mountain Corn, around a vase of mixed eucalyptus branches from the garden.


Tomato season is in full swing:
p { margin-bottom: 0.25cm; line-height: 100%; page-break-before: auto; }p.cjk { font-size: 10pt; }

Home-Grown Lunch – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

Tomato season means delicious fresh cream of tomato soup, done with skins, seeds and all and mouth-watering with fresh crusty bread and zingy wedges of cheddar. A side salad shows what’s in the garden – apart from the carrots; we buy in juicing carrots we’re happy with.


This is Moroccan Harira:


Moroccan Harira – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

Harira is a nourishing soup full of herbs, vegetables, legumes, noodles and lamb; served here with a side of crusty home-made bread. It's so economical and delicious. I make it in a "cauldron"!


The Cauldron – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australiac by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


I learnt to make our own pita breads last year and this is our favourite way to have them:


Lamb and Tabbouleh on Pita Bread – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

Home-made fresh wholemeal pita bread (the flour grown and processed locally by Eden Valley Farm) makes a crunchy base for tabbouleh with vegies from our garden, and local lamb drizzled with Greek yoghurt and sweet chilli sauce.

The beauty is doing all this stuff on less than half the average Australian grocery spending, because of how much food we grow ourselves. I used to be a starving university student subsisting mostly on rolled oats, pasta, liver, and block cheddar, and swore to myself that I would eat healthy food when I got my first salary, and that's how it has stayed. Five years of nutritional deprivation in student days have led to a lasting subsequent appreciation of and obsession with healthy fresh food.


I make big batches of honey cluster muesli for staple breakfasts, which we have with berries, grated apple, yoghurt etc. But sometimes, I wake up with hollow legs and need something with lots of protein:


Healthy Breakfast – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

On this particular morning it was a crust of still-hot freshly baked bread to go with scambled eggs with smoked salmon and parsley, with a side of fresh garden tomatoes. To balance it out, a smoothie was served with it, whizzed together from frozen strawberries, a dash of cranberry juice, a mostly peeled orange and a big dollop of natural Greek yoghurt. I felt re-born after this breakfast, and skipped my usual morning tea that day!

A nice thing about "tree changing" and living on your own farm is that you actually get to have time for these simple basic things. We don't have expensive habits but we do like our food to be healthy and nutritious.
egrogan and crazyredchestnut like this.

SueC is time travelling.

Last edited by SueC; 04-24-2018 at 10:08 AM.
SueC is offline  
post #433 of 2159 Old 04-24-2018, 01:05 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vermont
Posts: 5,919
• Horses: 3
Now I'm hungry @SueC , and I've just had my lunch!

We are making homemade wheat pita these days too, and I absolutely adore it. I can't remember if I've posted this to you before or not, so apologies if I've already shared. But, this is an almost weekly dinner for us as it's one of my absolute favorites to stuff in pita all together as a sandwich:
Falafel with hot sauce
Cabbage and pomegranate salad
Cucumber yogurt sauce

With your leftover pita (ha- if there's such a thing as leftover homemade pita in your house!), you could also toast it up for fattoush the next day, which will also help you use those tomatoes.

And, these scallion buttermilk flatbreads are a close cousin to pita, great on the side of a salad or wrapped around something for a sandwich.
SueC and knightrider like this.
egrogan is offline  
post #434 of 2159 Old 04-25-2018, 10:26 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 8,228
• Horses: 1
I can't get over how absolutely stunning those food pictures are, you really have a knack not just for cooking, but also for photography! The vibrant colors are incredible, and the meals look like they waltzed right out of a cookbook. Do you have a dish that's you're absolute favorite to make? I really could use a TARDIS, if for no other reason than to try that "Proper Roast Chicken" dish, and that yummy looking corn!

Cooking has never been my forte, and I admittedly struggle in the kitchen. Boyfriend has worn quite a few professional "hats" in our nearly five years together, and (while he seems to be happily settled in a pseudo-different field now) chef was one of them. Why would I bother learning when I'm with someone who has professional training? xD At least, that was my thought process at the time. I've always found it a little stressful, especially because my prep is so slow. These days I stick mostly to eggs and sandwiches ):

I've only driven once (a pair of Percherons, it was awesome!), so I'd definitely need to learn, and I'd also need access to a horse who's broke for it. It's definitely something I've considered learning, but I'm in sort of an odd position at the moment. I don't really have many "equestrian" contacts here, and certainly none that drive.

I think I've mentioned this on another thread, but I tend to go around in circles a lot. A thought process that typically looks a lot like this:
"I have Gator, and should not move forward with purchasing another horse until I haul him to Texas, and am in a better physical state" > "But I miss being around horses so much... maybe I should buy a mini so I can at least get some 'therapy' in the meantime" > "If I'm going to spend the money on purchasing a mini and the upkeep for one, I should just purchase something I can ride and fully enjoy" > back to point one.
I'm not really sure what the right answer is. ):
SueC and knightrider like this.

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
Zexious is offline  
post #435 of 2159 Old 04-26-2018, 12:09 AM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,067
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zexious View Post
I think I've mentioned this on another thread, but I tend to go around in circles a lot. A thought process that typically looks a lot like this:
"I have Gator, and should not move forward with purchasing another horse until I haul him to Texas, and am in a better physical state" > "But I miss being around horses so much... maybe I should buy a mini so I can at least get some 'therapy' in the meantime" > "If I'm going to spend the money on purchasing a mini and the upkeep for one, I should just purchase something I can ride and fully enjoy" > back to point one.
I'm not really sure what the right answer is. ):
Yes, that happens! Do you know the story of Buridan's ***? It's not like your predicament, but it may amuse you and give you food for thought.



There are many ways to resolve this paradox. Here's one:


https://philosophynow.org/issues/81/..._Doesnt_Starve


knightrider likes this.

SueC is time travelling.
SueC is offline  
post #436 of 2159 Old 04-26-2018, 04:51 AM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,067
• Horses: 3
@bsms: I gather that's Mia's foal running in front of her in that photo you posted with her at her new home? And I wanted to say thanks again for bringing an interesting discussion to this journal - I enjoy high-level discussions on this topic in a relaxed setting! It's remarkable how it's often the newcomer to an area of endeavour who can see and question things that are so much a part of the wallpaper that people who have been in the room a long time may not notice them anymore! I think that's a really good thing. Otherwise, as they say, "Change happens one funeral at a time!" And isn't it amazing how much working with and learning from horses teaches us about life. And that life really begins after 40!




@Zexious: Thank you for your kind comments on that food post. I actually wasn't encouraged to cook when I was a kid, in case I made a mess in the kitchen, and had to learn pretty much from scratch when I started living away from home during the week at age 14 to attend a Senior High School in Perth. I remember that my first attempts at pizza bases were a total failure - they were like Blu-Tack - do you have that in the States? It's a semisolid sticky goo for attaching posters to the walls without damaging them. It wasn't until I took a Microbiology course at university that I really started to make good pizza dough. - Percherons are such a lovely breed! Re driving, do you have a Donkey Society in your state? Donkey people do a lot of driving and are a friendly bunch; if you contacted such an association I'm sure you could attend driving and driving training days if they have them (they have them here!), and make a bunch of cool new friends as a bonus. - And if you're ever in Australia, I'll make that chicken dish for you!


@egrogan, thank you very much for those great recipes, I will enjoy making those. Do you know, I recently had too much leftover crispy pita bread and was eating it over and over broken up with cheese, tomatoes, olives etc, until it got a tiny bit monotonous. And I didn't even think of fattoush - I've seen that before, and even eaten it before when I lived in Sydney, but I've never actually made it myself and now I have all the ingredients in the garden for it. So I'm making it this week, and I think it will become another staple! - I've had several sad goes at making falafel, which resulted initially in a lot of mush in a frypan, and subsequently in semisolid falling-apart objects. Any tips on avoiding problems? I'll try out your recipe next time I have a go at those.


Summer is coming up for you, so here's a salad that became a favourite this past summer at our house - friend's recipe:


TRUDY & TREVOR'S BEAN SALAD


2 big handfuls of green beans, cut diagonally 6-8cm, then lightly steamed
1 cup butter bean mix, or fresh, lightly steamed broad bean kernels if you grow broad beans (Aquadulce is a wonderful eating variety)
1 cup cherry tomatoes or diced larger garden tomatoes
1 handful snowpeas, sliced diagonally
1 Lebanese cucumber, cubed
3 spring onions or 1 small red onion, sliced
1 cup chopped fresh parsley
1 generous chunk feta cheese, crumbled into small pieces
Dressing of your choice (lime juice whisked with a little whole-egg mayonnaise was my favourite last summer)

Just mix it all up together and enjoy!
bsms, egrogan and knightrider like this.

SueC is time travelling.
SueC is offline  
post #437 of 2159 Old 04-26-2018, 07:21 AM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,067
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms View Post
I've got a lot of spring clean-up waiting for me - branches to cut off of a tree that always grows too fast, a hole in the wall of our house about 23-24 feet up, making it tough to use a ladder but also dangerous to try to reach down from above.
That sounds like a job that sits on the to-do list and causes aggravation. Can you borrow or hire a scaffold? We got a second-hand scaffold for building our house; paid under $1K for it and really great for maintenance, gutter cleaning in high places etc.


Scaffold Comes in Handy – Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


And in the next one you can see where the scaffold is still sitting presently. The reason is that we need to install the TV antenna at the gable apex and it's actually been such a low priority we have been putting it off!


Owner Build Five Years In – Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr

In Australia, surprisingly large numbers of people die from accidental falls. Scaffolds and even mechanical cherry-pickers reduce that risk. A neighbour hired one of those to build his farm shed.

bsms, egrogan and knightrider like this.

SueC is time travelling.
SueC is offline  
post #438 of 2159 Old 04-26-2018, 07:29 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vermont
Posts: 5,919
• Horses: 3
@SueC , the key to non-mushy falafel is this: use dried, not canned chickpeas, and don't cook them before forming the patties. I know it sounds strange, but that made all the difference in the world for me as I too had those mushy problems.

I realized the wrong recipe linked above, so here it is again: https://www.thedailymeal.com/recipes...falafel-recipe

You'll soak the chickpeas in cold water for 10-12 hours before you want to use them. In a food processor, just whiz all the ingredients together. It won't be a smooth paste, but rather a fine, almost sandy texture. Then I take a large tablespoon, scoop out an oblong ball, and pat it slightly flat so it cooks evenly. I fry them in a shallow pan with a light skim of neutral oil. They can sit in a warm oven on parchment paper until you're ready to eat them, and they reheat well.

Can't wait for summer beans to try that recipe. I love fresh beans!
SueC and knightrider like this.
egrogan is offline  
post #439 of 2159 Old 04-26-2018, 09:39 AM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,067
• Horses: 3
Here's a little something from the Krones&Kodgers thread, which along with the 40+ thread is a group of people I really enjoy. I'm not technically qualified to be on K&K yet, but the kind folks there waived my underage-ness and @Change even bequeathed me her black leather cheer-leading outfit, since she is now an official Krone:

https://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk...post1970517871

https://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk...post1970517393

https://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk...55873/page327/


And this is the funniest clip about horses I've seen in a good while, from K&K. Thanks, @george the mule !



bsms and knightrider like this.

SueC is time travelling.
SueC is offline  
post #440 of 2159 Old 04-26-2018, 09:56 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Hildreth, FL
Posts: 2,342
• Horses: 5
I have a solution for that Buridan's *** problem that I've used for myself and lots of children when we can't make a decision. I tell the children to flip a coin, with heads being one decision and tails being the other. When the coin comes up, you will either feel some small amount of joy . . . or disappointment. If it is joy, then you know that is the decision you secretly want. If it's disappointment, then you know you secretly wanted the other thing. It's pretty effective, too.

I couldn't post my answer in the window where you asked it, so here is my answer.

I had the photos on Photobucket and when they decided to charge $300 to use Photobucket, they removed all the photos. I never went back and replaced them because I didn't think anyone would ever read the journal or care. It is so kind of you to say you liked it.

I decided I wanted to be a writer at age 4 before I knew how to write. I made up my own language and my mom saved the books I wrote in that language. It was a form of symbols for words.

I started getting rejections from publishers at age 18, and have been steadily rejected ever since. I probably have gotten a hundred rejections in my lifetime, and it has led me to believe that my stuff isn't worth reading. I am so thrilled that someone actually is reading (and maybe even liking) my stuff that I put on Horse Forum, "Horse Stories and Poems". My husband refused to read my novels, my kids were bored with them. I gave my best friend copies of my novels to keep, in case my wooden house might burn down, and her husband threw them out when they moved. You can imagine why I thought my writing is valueless. I read a whole bunch of mini novels that people put on Horse Forum in that section "Horse Stories and Poems", enjoyed every one of them, and so, got the courage to give my own novels a shot. Wow, it's been great.

When I get some time, I will put up some of the photos that Photobucket deleted. If you like my journal, go read Golden Horse's journal about Mr. Gibbs and Gottatrot's entire book that is on one page of her journal. They are both better than mine and you will hardly be able to put them down!

Thank you again, for your interest. It is such a shot in the arm after (what feels like) hundreds of years of rejection!!
bsms and SueC like this.
knightrider is online now  
Reply

Tags
donkeys , free-ranging horses , french trotters , life & the universe , riding standardbreds

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking up arabians and half arabians on data source! Twilight Arabians Horse Breeds 48 11-17-2013 08:21 PM
Arabians & Half-Arabians in Florida? RunRideNDive Horse Breeds 1 10-16-2012 04:48 PM
Come watch the Arabians and Half-Arabians compete at Dressage at Lexington July 13-15 HGEsquire Horse Shows 8 07-06-2012 07:12 PM
Introducing my Herd of Arabians and Half Arabians :) Spirit Thyme Horse Pictures 51 09-25-2010 11:52 PM
People with Arabians: What saddle do you use and like? Wallaby Horse Tack and Equipment 4 05-27-2009 12:05 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome