Trotters, Arabians, Donkeys and Other People - Page 76 - The Horse Forum
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post #751 of 2159 Old 08-13-2018, 12:01 AM Thread Starter
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That's lovely, @bsms - thanks for sharing that with us!

Horses really are so many things rolled into one. Personal trainers, friends, hiking buddies, Zen masters, trauma therapists, dancing partners, superhuman antennae, fellow hygge appreciators, rocket transport with liftoff... (who will add to this list? C'mon, there's more! )

Try paying for all those separately. And people think horses are expensive!
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post #752 of 2159 Old 08-13-2018, 12:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms View Post
I don't know if you are well-rounded. Heck, I don't like "round" applied to horses, either! But you come across as well-balanced, which is better.
This is great.
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post #753 of 2159 Old 08-13-2018, 02:03 AM Thread Starter
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Isn't it? I'm going to be adopting "well-balanced" myself from now on, because it's much better. Good thing @bsms hasn't copyrighted it!
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post #754 of 2159 Old 08-13-2018, 10:10 AM
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@SueC thank you! My heifer is actually kind of an oddball. Her mother is a Jersey x Milking Shorthorn. As they were AIing the milk cows around here they ran out of semen. So, they borrowed some left over angus semen in an effort to just get her bred. She is a beautiful heifer. She has enough of a beef cow look to her that I think her calves may be able to hit a truck with the other beef calves as long as I breed her to an angus bull. I know she’ll produce less, but I am okay with that.

I love everything you wrote and it gave me a lot to think about.

@bsms thank you. I really like that concept or well-balanced. I like what you wrote too. I am the worst for trying to prove myself, and I think that I also appreciate the relationship I have with horses for many of the same reasons.
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Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaam’s Donkey
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post #755 of 2159 Old 08-13-2018, 11:01 AM
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Oh, I forgot to mention that I did have a lovely Sunday. We didn’t do much at all, which is the way I like my Sundays. Husband and I went on a ride out in the brush. We were loping down the road when we realized the old dog had stuck with us, and so we slowed down and walked along. She usually turns around when we go somewhere she thinks will be too far. It ended up being nice though, just walking along. Bones was a bit up still, but it was good for him to have to control it instead of use it.

Then I watched Netflix, and napped. Lol. It was a nice lazy day. The girls even laid around most of the day. Little girl ripped a chunk out of Elvis when she rinsed him off (he’s very touchy lately) but oddly after it eventually stopped bleeding it almost looked better missing a piece. She had a very good attitude again. I was sad for her because her sister was invited to go on a big trip to ride roller coasters this weekend. She had tears in her eyes but she said all of the right things. She is trying very hard to be a good and kind girl through all of this.

I had to edit just to add this picture of my beautiful little heifer that my Aunt sent to me. She is who owns the cow and she is this amazing homemaker and mother. She had me milk for her when she was gone and I loved having all of the milk! It was very different than my goats, although my goat Eunice, who was a rotten animal, produced two gallons a day at her heaviest!
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Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaam’s Donkey

Last edited by Knave; 08-13-2018 at 11:07 AM.
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post #756 of 2159 Old 08-14-2018, 02:35 AM Thread Starter
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I like the cow and the calf, @Knave ! Amazing how dominant the Jersey genes are in that Shorthorn cross. Is she half/half, or more Jersey than Shorthorn? Anyhow, the calf is half dairy breed, half beef and as you say, should still be fine for a house cow, plus her 3/4 beef calves should fit in with what goes on the truck.

Our neighbours here have an Angus stud, and have run a small amount of other breeds, like Salers, Murray Grey and Limousin. They were thinking about using one of their Murray Grey orphan heifers as a house cow at one point, even though considered a beef breed. Robyn said there were good dairy genes in Murray Greys as well, from a house cow perspective. If you don't need much milk, you don't necessarily need a dairy breed.

Are you going to be able to share milk with a calf on, with your heifer, or do you need more milk than that?

Counting down the days here until little girl's surgery. We want her to get better ASAP. Please send hugs from us.

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post #757 of 2159 Old 08-14-2018, 08:15 AM Thread Starter
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Day 16 (only 26+days to go)

Today was an inevitable town day. It had taken me months to get an appointment to be seen by an ophthalmologist, and I wasn't skipping it just because I have foot fractures. It is, however, funny when you go into an eye specialist's place with a broken foot sporting crutches. People seem to think you've come to the wrong place!

I capitalised on the wide eyes of the receptionists by saying, "Ah've coom about me broken foot" in a Yorkshire accent, before laughing at the joke with them. Dr Offerman turned out to be a neat, very polite man with a bearing halfway between that of a forensic expert and a physics researcher. My problem is that I've had a really irritating foreign body sensation in my right eye for over two years now, but neither my GP nor the optometrist could find one. I used to get a few ingrown lashes in my mid-30s which created similar sensations until ripped out. Whatever it was had been waking me up in the night during REM sleep, when the eyes move rapidly under the lids - the sense of irritation of moving the eye even slightly under closed lids is huge, and REM isn't slight movement.

No foreign body was found, but blepharitis was present (which would also be the case after a long-standing foreign body somewhere near the lids), so we're treating that. The hypothesis is that my right eye isn't producing enough lubrication at present and this causes the lids to rub painfully and get irritated. Dr Offerman wrote down a suitable over-the-counter lubricating eyedrop for day use, as well as a gel for night use, to deal with the irritation. He also said that this condition benefits from having lots of fish oil in the diet, so I'm taking fish oil capsules for at least 6 weeks (which will also help bone healing ). I'm very happy when doctors have a clue about nutrition and don't just rely on pharmaceuticals! We'll see how it goes, and I get reviewed in 6 weeks.

On the plus side, apart from that I have very healthy eyes, normal pressure, nice retina - and I actually saw my own retina too while he was looking at it! Considering that glaucoma runs in all the women amongst my relatives, it was nice to have no signs of it.

The weather was rubbish, and Bill was giving me a lift back home - Brett had brought me in on his way to work. He simply swapped his midweek visit from Wednesday to Tuesday this week. I always do a lot of cooking ahead when Bill is over, and then we do a lot of sampling, and Bill gets to take slices of newly made cake home. Our kitchen is the heart of the open living area, and when you're working at the main bench, you can converse easily with people sitting at the dining table. Cooking is the sort of work I can do while still being good company. It lends itself to a good chinwag.

Today I made a very eggy coconut cake, and a Thai-style pumpkin soup with seafood mix, using the last Turk's Turban, which I oven roasted first. See below for what these look like...



That was our first big haul of this both decorative and super-delicious variety, four years ago. It really is fun to grow your own food.

For those wondering why I was using crutches, I use the peg-leg specifically for walking and outdoors work. If you have to sit down a lot or climb in and out of cars, and you're not walking far, or carrying anything, you're better off using crutches.

Speaking of the peg-leg, yesterday it got another good airing. The weather was highly suitable for a lunchtime walk of our bush tracks, much to the delight of the dog. I got a good dose of Vitamin D at the same time, as the sun was out, and I was out for nearly an hour. It was only a 2km lap, which normally takes 20 minutes, but peg-legging is a lot slower than proper striding walking, plus the last 500m of the walk was across the very bockety middle meadow. Peg-legs perform well on level surfaces, but aren't great for uneven ground, or bush-bashing (though they at least give you that option).

The stance was still a bit wide on the photos I posted yesterday, because the gadget needed adjusting; much better now. I am now consciously catwalking (crutch leg placed almost in line in front of the other foot) to get the right alignment instead of duck-waddling, which is so inelegant. To some degree though, because your peg-leg isn't jointed like a normal leg, you do have to raise and lower and rotate your hip as needed to compensate, especially if you go over bumpy ground. And you have to consciously work towards an even swing of the arms, which is sort of an exaggerated power-walker swing at first.

It's great to have weight-bearing exercise for the top half of my dodgy leg - so from the knee upwards, I won't be losing muscle, or bone density, from the enforced changes to normal body use while my fractures are healing. And I can groom, feed, rug and unrug the horses independently.

I'll take some more foot photos soon. The bruising is starting to clear, and I can actually touch the poor thing again (but not over the fracture area ). I can also put some weight on the heel again, and today I had lunch at the table, with my foot flat on the floor. Progress!
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post #758 of 2159 Old 08-14-2018, 10:39 AM
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@SueC I like your pictures! I am sure you made everyone laugh with your pirate joke!

Thank you for the well wishes for little girl. I am counting the days too. She had a good day yesterday though. :) She seemed happy all day.

The cow is half and half. She is very big in person, so that is something that gives away her cross a bit to me. She is a first year herself. Her mother was such a nice cow that she raised not only the family but six calves last year! I think that my calf will be able to keep her own calf plus one and raise us even with the angus in her. I hope not to be wrong, but I am feeling fairly confident about it. My nasty Eunice had meat goat in her and was a spectacular milker. Her personality left a lot to be desired, but the calf seems very sweet and like she wants a friend.
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Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaam’s Donkey
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post #759 of 2159 Old 08-14-2018, 08:45 PM Thread Starter
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A while back, I did a couple of entries on building a strawbale farmhouse:

https://www.horseforum.com/member-jo...post1970558119

Looking back, it was a very mad thing we did to build our own house, but it was also a very very good thing, because we love living in it. Brett always says he has amnesia from all the emotional trauma of being a first-time builder and all the stress and privations of our building years, and therefore can't remember much of actually building the place. The poor dear. He's so Gothic (but has a strange antipathy to hair product ).

Anyway... here's the follow-up article to the one hyperlinked above: What does the thing actually look like inside? It appeared in The Owner Builder No.207 June/July 2018, and while I have the pdf of the article, unfortunately it's too large to attach here. Lynda does such a fabulous job of the visual presentation, whereas all I can give you here is the bare bones original text and photographs!



STRAWBALE INTERIORS

By Sue Coulstock, Redmond WA

When you build a strawbale house, there are many options for your interior aesthetics. The common denominator with that style of building is having visible strawbale perimeter walls, usually either earth plastered or lime plastered. You can add pigments to your plaster if you want particular colours, but one thing you should never do is paint plastered strawbale walls, because it interferes with the breathability of the wall and can lead to condensation in the straw, which must be kept dry.

Most people who build strawbale houses love the ambience of super-thick, naturally plastered walls, but you do get some strange exceptions. I’ve heard people ask whether you can gyprock over the interior strawbale walls so you can have a “normal” interior, and wondered why they don’t just build a “normal” house instead. In order to preserve the straw and eliminate fire risk, straw must be properly plastered.

We lime plastered our walls. Using a spread of sand grain sizes in the mix, we essentially made a version of limestone, and kept the colour natural. In order to avoid stark whiteness, we put some golden sand into the mix as well, and kept our proportions constant for a consistent off-white colour. The finish coat was floated off with flexible pool floats, which gave us a hand-textured rustic finish that also drew the lime, rather than the sand, to the exterior “skin”, giving us a tough finish that doesn’t shed sand.

Many people who build strawbale houses want to achieve a uniform interior and plaster their internal walls the same as the strawbale walls. Sometimes all the interior walls are strawbale too, but usually people use conventional interior walls as they are narrower and take up less of the slab. There are a number of ways in which timber framed internal walls can be set up for plastering; one involves straw stuffed between mesh that’s then plastered, another is a variation on wattle and daub. Building friends nailed up special boards that could take lime plaster. These are ways of achieving similar wall finishes throughout.

Brett and I went with a hybrid interior. The house was already a hybrid externally, with two zincalume back corners where the wet areas are located, so why not continue the theme indoors? With one caveat: In the living area and bedrooms, we still wanted to feel surrounded by straw, so we built some strawbale internal walls in the right places. This also led to increased privacy and noise reduction indoors. Our living area and two of the bedrooms have three strawbale walls and one conventional wall each.

Instead of making other types of walls blend with the plastered strawbale walls, we wanted to turn them into features – let each material take its own pride of place.


Colonial style face brick wall

The back of the living area is brick and done in a colonial style to fit in with the idea of a timeless farmhouse rather than an obvious new build. An Australian Nectre oven – a heater, oven, cooktop and hot water booster in one – sits straight against this wall, whose thermal mass helps produce a more even and lasting heat release from the wood fire. No special hearth is required – both the brick wall and the exposed coloured concrete floor are fire-resistant materials.


Lounge Facing South-West – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Nectre Wood Heater/Stove/Oven Against Interior Brick Wall – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Old Map With Rustic Frame – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Numbat & Native American – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Dining Area Facing West – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


North Garden Through Dining Window – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Kitchen / Dining Facing West – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Autumn Sunlight Heating Dining Floor – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr
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post #760 of 2159 Old 08-14-2018, 09:22 PM Thread Starter
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View East Through Dining AreaWindow – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Curious Donkeys – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


North Wall of Open Living Area – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Niche in Strawbale Wall – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Painted Glass Sunburst Window – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Painted Glass Frog & Swamp Window– Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Plasterboard walls

The timber kitchen is built into a plasterboarded corner. We chose a strong sunny citrus paint for a warm feel, partnered with green backsplash tiling with red accents. The paint has a strongly textured finish to harmonise with the textured feel of the lime plaster in the adjacent and opposite walls.


Kitchen – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Cow Clock – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


Lizard Tile – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr


In each of the three bedrooms and the office, we have one plasterboard wall. We decided to make them stand out with bold colours and to use them as gallery walls for easy picture hanging.

In the master bedroom, we chose a deep red colour which creates a marvellous partnership with the dark timbers of the rustic architraves and cornices, and the glossy white painted doors, and the chocolate-coloured carved wood wardrobe set against that wall. This wardrobe, an auction-house treasure, was the first physical piece of our house. It was in the garage of our rental while we were drawing up plans.
The three lime plastered walls in the bedroom create a feeling of serenity and simplicity; the feature wall adds a dash of warmth and beauty. Lampshades and bedside mats pick up the red theme, as do our framed wedding photograph above the bed and a print we picked up in an art gallery in Hobart. Curtains and bedspread echo the creamy whites of the lime plaster. This limited colour palette is very restful, and lets us fully appreciate the play of the morning sunlight in the room when we wake up.
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