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post #861 of 2159 Old 09-04-2018, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SueC View Post
PS: Anyone here ever been across the Royal Gorge Bridge in Colorado? Saw that on the Internet this morning and looks very impressive!

Yep, been there and walked over it - quite impressive! My DH (who is terrified of heights) had the time of his life
This was part of our quest of following the Arkansas River in Colorado (we lived in AR during that time). Fun times!!!
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post #862 of 2159 Old 09-05-2018, 05:49 AM Thread Starter
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Bwahahaha, @SwissMiss ! And I reckon you would have had a pretty good chance of having been across the Europabrücke at some point in your life? Has your DH had the pleasure? My mother used to go pale crossing that one, especially in a high wind during a traffic jam, when it would swing. It's supposed to swing! Makes it more resilient...








Beaming best wishes to you for recovering from your affliction.

Hullo, @Knave , @knightrider , @Dragoon , @gottatrot , @egrogan ! Hope you're all having a great week.
And Louise had her little girl on August 31; everyone well. Her best friend had a little boy three days later. DHs being put to good use I hear. You may hear from her in person once she can draw her eyes away from her brand-new earthling! I somehow don't think she is thinking about horses right now...

A joke for you all: Why didn't Noah go fishing? ...he only had two worms.

SueC is time travelling.
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post #863 of 2159 Old 09-05-2018, 07:56 AM
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As long as my DH can't see the ground, he is fine. So driving over the bridge you showed is no problem.
This one? A completely different ballgame! Check it out

World's longest pedestrian suspension bridge opens in Switzerland: Photos and video


And since you like hiking: How about this one? It is very close to where I grew up.


Good to hear that Louise and baby girl are doing good Yeah, don't think she is thinking about horses much atm
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post #864 of 2159 Old 09-05-2018, 08:12 AM
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Uggh, I really hate bridges. Particularly the high water crossing variety. Nothing but bad, irrational thoughts crossing those. When we lived in Michigan, we had to go over the Blue Water Bridge into Ontario pretty frequently, as that was the fastest route over to New York, where we had lots of friends and family. The international border crossing is on the edge of the bridge, and the line to go through customs was almost always at least an hour, so you just had to sit there feeling the whole thing shaking with the traffic. Even worse during high winter winds. Makes me shudder just thinking about it now!



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post #865 of 2159 Old 09-05-2018, 08:19 AM
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I think I would enjoy walking the bridges, but if I had to drive on one I would think I was going to die.

Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaam’s Donkey
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post #866 of 2159 Old 09-05-2018, 08:31 AM
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So, I was sitting here eating my breakfast and thinking about bridges. When I was in high school I went on a trip with my grandfather to see my uncle in Oregon and go on a pack trip.

It is one of my favorite memories. I took a mare called Runt. She was my horse, likely the best horse I’ll ever have owned, but super hot and anxious. As we first began our trip we crossed a little bridge. Ruby panicked and jumped off. I lost my packhorse in the drama. There was tall grass and a creek. She missed the creek diving into the green. Unbeknown to either of us there was a hidden stump in the grass, and she hit it hard right in the center on her chest. It threw her back.

After I righted myself and got back onto the trail she was more nervous, but the stump had been a blessing in controlling her suicidal tendencies. She was shaking all over but wouldn’t jump. Now, in Oregon in the wilderness there is some steep cliffhanger trails and I was as nervous as Runt looking down and instead of seeing the beauty of the scene I could imagine my death. Lol

So, we crossed other short bridges and she kept it together. Then, towards the end of the first day there was a real bridge. A river raged underneath and Runt did not want to step onto it. I prayed the stump would stay in her mind. I believe it did as she shook and sweat dripped from her neck and she danced across the bridge.

After that trip I never saw the day she was scared of heights again. I could ride her anywhere and she was a cat on the trails. It was what eventually took her out of the game.

Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaam’s Donkey
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post #867 of 2159 Old 09-05-2018, 06:09 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Knave View Post
I have always taken out stitches myself too. Really, it never has been an issue. I simply wanted to do the follow up because I wanted a doctor to look at the toe. I don’t know it did any good, but husband pointed out that she would hate me instead of him if I took them out...
I think we have shared DNA that's a bit more recent than the Dark Ages!


Quote:
I am glad that you taught the way you did. I too hated being talked down to as a child. I remember thinking the Greeks, or whatever culture I had done some reading on, had it right when they believed a child was capable of being a small adult. Lol. Now I no longer fall pray to such a mentality, because I believe children deserve protection, love, and even empathy for the mistakes that they will make because they are still learning.
And when you think about it, bits of that also apply to adults... But yeah, to me a good combination for dealing with children and adolescents is total respect and awareness of humanness, as well as a truckload of appropriate nurturing. Plus high expectations of good behaviour.

I loved this film:

https://iameleven.squarespace.com/trailer

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post #868 of 2159 Old 09-05-2018, 07:04 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by SwissMiss View Post
As long as my DH can't see the ground, he is fine. So driving over the bridge you showed is no problem.
This one? A completely different ballgame! Check it out

World's longest pedestrian suspension bridge opens in Switzerland: Photos and video
Wow, that one is wonderful, and I'd actually be OK on it because the sides are sufficiently high. I mostly stress when I feel someone could easily hoik me over the side of something like this. Or, when the sides are only the height of my hips. This is a really lovely bridge. And a bit more of a mouthful than this one we did regularly at Cataract Gorge in Launceston, Tasmania, when we were stationed there for work in 2009:






Quote:
And since you like hiking: How about this one? It is very close to where I grew up.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1gkrjsG-HQ
Wow, @SwissMiss , did you give us something to look at for our morning cup of tea! I've got to confess, sheer drops make me queasy, but on the other hand it's totally safe when you're clipped into a cable like that, and I can really see the attraction of doing something like that. And such a pretty area! I was however saying to Brett, who proposed to me on the summit of the most strenuous climb in the Stirling Ranges, Mt Toolbrunup, that it would be bad to propose on Mürren because then you probably couldn't return on an annual pilgrimage once you're, I don't know, 65+ or something... and that would be sad...

It was on the middle spire of this, very romantic...




When watching your clip I did shudder thinking about how on earth they set up Klettersteig in the first place though...

Thankyou for posting a piece of your birthplace!

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post #869 of 2159 Old 09-05-2018, 07:20 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by egrogan View Post
Uggh, I really hate bridges. Particularly the high water crossing variety. Nothing but bad, irrational thoughts crossing those. When we lived in Michigan, we had to go over the Blue Water Bridge into Ontario pretty frequently, as that was the fastest route over to New York, where we had lots of friends and family. The international border crossing is on the edge of the bridge, and the line to go through customs was almost always at least an hour, so you just had to sit there feeling the whole thing shaking with the traffic. Even worse during high winter winds. Makes me shudder just thinking about it now!



It's a wonderful bridge, but I can see why you wouldn't want to be stuck on it!

It's seriously winter in that photo! What an ice sculpture in the foreground! Natural I think?

@Northernstar is from Michigan, though I've not heard from her in a while. She told me all about maple syrup production and had lovely Morgan mares too. Still has them I would think!

When we think of New York, Brett and I instantly think of Suzanne Vega, one of our favourite singers...


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post #870 of 2159 Old 09-07-2018, 01:15 AM Thread Starter
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Day 40! 6-week X-ray and all clear for walking!

I'll go with the bad news first: No horse-riding yet. No heights, basically, for a bit. And I'm not buying a Shetland Pony. (But, I will definitely be pushing at this boundary when my walking gets comfortable enough. I've just asked my horse and he's missing our outings too.)

Everything else is good news. The 6-week X-rays show really good new bone formation and no Lisfranc ligament damage. I'm cleared to walk, which is nice, considering I've been walking (well, hobbling really) indoors since Saturday, just in the splint boot, no crutches, because it felt right. It's really amazing how your body will tell you what's OK and what isn't if you actually listen to it.

Those X-rays were a bit of a contortionist experience. The young radiographer was lovely and we laughed and joked a lot. She was showing me the various weird and wonderful poses I was to assume on several barefoot weightbearing takes, and I'm going, "Ummmmh, can I have one crutch in case I unbalance?" And so, I stood bearing my full bodyweight on my bare injured foot, in so-called flamingo pose, for the first time since my accident. And it didn't hurt, it was just the usual funny sensations coming from that area - pins and needles in the ball of the foot, creakiness, even crunchiness (but it's not the bones, so that's OK ).

And isn't it cool that the days of film as mainstay have passed for X-ray as well as photography? Nowadays they just have sensitive plates that convert the radiation imprint into zeroes and ones that get sent into a computer for digital re-construction. So, even X-rays are digital these days.

Behind the reception desk at X-ray was a young woman who looked at my astronaut boot and said, "Ah, been there!" I had shown up at 7.30am when things aren't busy and people are happy to chat then. Turns out she fractured her ankle-bone during netball two years previously, when someone stepped on the side of her ankle as she was moving. We compared notes. She says her calf still isn't back to normal size after all that time, but she's working on it. We wished each other luck and an excellent day.

I was way early for my 8.20am orthopaedics appointment in fracture clinic. Someone didn't turn up who should have, so the receptionist bantered with me. We're getting to know each other a little with all this going to fracture clinic - she's a lovely, very energetic, endearingly don't-mess-with-me older lady. She used to ride horses too, but life has taken her elsewhere. We ended up chatting about Monty Python's "Machine That Goes Bing" and the public hospital experience, which has been A1 in all respects for me for this particular injury, everyone I've been meeting and dealing with have been top-notch wonderful and professional all rolled into one, and as we said to each other, that's often not the case. Also we referred to Grumpy Old Men / Women which I've loved and identified with since my 30s and she said she formally became like that at 50. We both swore we'd be holy terrors if we lived to be 80.

Zac the orthopaedic specialist is still enjoying Florida, so today I had a short-term young locum from Perth, resplendent in turban and jet-black beard. All three of the specialists I've seen for this injury have been Generation Y and so lovely, down-to-earth, well-mannered, and professional. The very first leaving class I taught back in 1998 was GenY and after getting to know them, I felt so happy that the world was getting a better generation than our own next, and that's indeed how it has turned out. GenX was so shiitake. Don't get me started on my leaving yearbook, on how most (but not all) of my generation answered the question of what they wanted to achieve with their lives with responses like, "Get rich," "Be a millionaire by the time I'm 25," "Get laid as much as possible," "Own a Ferrari," "Go to Paris and get famous," blah blah yadda yadda. It was all me-me-me, most people didn't appear to consider that they might have something to offer the world, that they should offer the world. Oh no, the world was like a supermarket at far as most of them were concerned.


My allocated orthopaedics specialist shook my hand warmly and introduced himself, said the X-rays were great, looked at my foot, and said, "Walk! As much as you can, but sensible and not overdoing it. Build it up. No running, no horseriding yet, sorry, walk walk walk!" I asked him if I could rollerblade yet and he laughed and said to me that it's not a problem for my foot, but what he worries about is that I will feel a twinge of electric pain at some point and this will cause me to stack it and fracture something else higher up. So officially he was going to say no. I winked at him and said, "I do use a crash helmet and have full wrist protectors as well as knee and elbow gear on standard as well, so I tell you what, I'll walk walk walk on that foot this week and do a study on the assorted twinges and take it from there, maybe in a week or two...but I promise to stay in pretty flat areas, no big downhills so no uncontrolled speed..."

Next we discussed good hiking trails, since he's from Perth and would like to get out and about a little. He mentioned Bluff Knoll and I told him it's a tourist hike, Toolbrunup is the real deal, and if he wants something that only takes an hour to climb and is the biggest bang for your buck, Mt Talyuberlup is the thing: A cave on top, and when you get on the other side of that, a Lord of the Rings view, a rock formation like an eagle on your right, and a little goat track between that and the cliff that takes you to the summit proper. This one:





Birthday Walk XIV
by Brett and Sue Coulstock, on Flickr



...the one Brett and I climbed the weekend before I broke my foot actually... and you might have seen these photos then too.

The friendly orthopaedics fellow got me to write down the name of that one, and showed me my X-rays. He also suggested I make my astronaut boot an outdoors-only thing ASAP and start wearing supportive hiking boots indoors on both feet. He says I can walk on reasonably level ground outdoors immediately as well, in the astronaut boot, in which I will still be anywhere between 2 and 6 weeks - phase in the hiking boots as pain permits. To take crutches for the first couple of days for extra assistance, and in case I need to rest the foot on the way back. Not to do any tiptoeing on my injured foot for a bit, nor heel raises. To do range-of-motion exercises for my ankles, and that he'd tee me up with the physiotherapy team for rehab.

I'm well advised to keep using the pirate leg when on uneven or muddy ground - for my horse feeding routine, basically - for another couple of weeks. He was really interested in the pirate leg actually, so I told him the model name (it was at home!). He also told me that my foot was going to have associated swelling for at least half a year, perhaps a year - that's normal for that sort of fracture.

I couldn't make physio today or they would have sent me straight there, but Brett needed to go to work and he's got the late shift, so we arranged it for early next week, and I'll do all sorts of things meanwhile anyway.

On the way home, I did stop in at Trailblazers and buy myself a new pair of hiking shoes for the rehab, and the mountain climbs that lie beyond. My old Keens were relegated to farm wear recently, although I did wear them in the last climb before the accident, in the photo above. I needed a new pair anyway - the soles were too worn for decent traction on rock. My last Keens were low-cut, which I prefer for most walks as I really don't ordinarily need ankle support. I have some high-cut Columbia boots for serious stuff like Cradle Mountain in Tasmania, but they're too tight for what I need to do now.

Keens have always been superb for people with wide feet like myself, and you do not need to break them in, they won't rub or blister you. I tried a few and ended up going with these:



I did actually consciously buy ankle-highs this time, because I do want a little more stability for the next six months or so, and this boot is kind of convertible - you don't have to use the top two clips for your laces if you don't want to, if you'd like less restraint.

Online review:

https://runrepeat.com/keen-gypsum-ii-mid-waterproof

That's nice, considering I bought them on foot feel and inspection alone.

Of course, the main problem with getting into the left one is pain associated with swelling, but this is not a problem if I can go straight in first thing in the morning, when the foot is almost normal. Compression tubing over the mid-foot has been helpful for reducing the daytime ballooning associated with the vertical position while I've been in the astronaut boot, but will roll inside a tight hiking boot, so I had a chat to a pharmacist on the phone earlier and she's put some ankle-high foot compression socks under the counter for Brett to pick up in his lunch break for me, so that hopefully I can convert from astronaut boot to hiking boot indoors tomorrow morning!

...and to celebrate all this I'm going to:

1) finish my Val McDermid book, Beneath The Bleeding, with my foot up. It's crunch time for all my hunches for the puzzle she has presented, and the rest can be read in one little sit-down. She's a great writer (known for the TV spin-off Wire in the Blood) - not just a crime writer. Her characterisation, sense of place, vocabulary, and observations on the human condition and modern madness are all superb; the crime is more a background thing, just the job that the beloved detective protagonists happen to do, with puzzles to figure out... this is my favourite of hers yet... but if you want a really outlandish and superb read, I highly recommend Haruki Murakami's The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle:


https://www.nytimes.com/1997/11/02/b...eets-west.html


2) Take the dog on my first official bipedal outdoors walk down the sand track and back, with crutches along just in case.




PS: Drove again for the first time today too!

SueC is time travelling.

Last edited by SueC; 09-07-2018 at 01:24 AM.
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