Why I Gotta Trot - Page 256 - The Horse Forum
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post #2551 of 3028 Old 11-20-2018, 10:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hondo View Post
@bsms Camp Verde is getting up in my neck of the woods...
Yes, and I need to explore it more. Prescott itself doesn't impress us. Camp Verde looks more like a modest town. I suspect the mountains around it are just as nice as the mountains in Utah, and the weather is nice. I believe they have a lot of boarding options, which seems like a strange way to keep horses but obviously works well for many people!

We plan to use our timeshare in Sedona in early December as a base to explore the area 20-50 miles away from Sedona. I tend to think of Arizona as strictly SOUTHERN Arizona and the Sonoran Desert, but much of Arizona is forest. A picture search of "mongolian rim az" will show those who haven't been here what I often forget - a LOT of very wild and open forest country in Arizona!


And Camp Verde has the advantage of having a decent selection of horse properties. Decisions.... Maybe we'll have a clearer idea after our December exploration. Arizona is a big state. But I've always loved southern Utah!

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #2552 of 3028 Old 11-20-2018, 10:30 AM
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Location: Kirkland, Arizona
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I spent a month on two separate occasions near St. George. It's pretty nice there. And I've spent many months all over SE Utah. Some really great places that I'd like to revisit with Hondo but not likely to happen.

Only thing nice about Prescott is that it has a Walmarts, a Tractor Supply, and a Harbor Freight. And medical institutions. Other than that I'm in and out as soon as possible.

My town of Wagoner, AZ has a population of about 5. Just about right.

So many trails, so little time.............

I think it important to always be mindful that the horse actually owes us nothing at all and it is we who owe the horse. "It's a goal"
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post #2553 of 3028 Old 11-20-2018, 11:03 AM
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Wagoner - looked it up - looks to be in great country. Close enough that one can get shopping done, but far enough to keep most people away. Here are the two areas we are most serious about in Utah (click to enlarge):


Cedar City is within an hour of Zion Nat'l Park, Cedar Breaks NM and Bryce Canyon. Over 9,000 foot mountains just to the east.

Ritchfield is smaller (good), is in an agricultural valley a couple hours north and has an Interstate for easy access. My college room mate turned sheep rancher lives about 3 hours NE while Zion and Bryce are 1-2 hours south. Talked to him last night. He suggested looking for land I could build on and having a small manufactured home built on it. Depends on zoning and price, but that might allow me to have a home with pasture.



We figure we need to live someplace the grandkids will WANT to come visit! My wife grew up on the beach in the Philippines. Likes the ocean but doesn't want to live on it. She's willing to trade living in snow to have more green around. She loves the mountains.

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #2554 of 3028 Old 11-20-2018, 04:21 PM
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Here ya go. I have stick built and manufactured selected with 5 acres minimum. You can change to lots/land set high/low price whatever.

https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sal...ct/5_zm/0_mmm/

You can also just google lots or homes for sale near a particular town and get oodles of listings. Happy shopping!

I think it important to always be mindful that the horse actually owes us nothing at all and it is we who owe the horse. "It's a goal"
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post #2555 of 3028 Old 11-20-2018, 05:46 PM
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Thanks, @Hondo . Bookmarked for convenience. I expect to check it regularly.

We adopted our son a few months after getting married. We'll be 32 years married in January, and this January will be the first month since adopting our son that we won't have kids in the house! It is forcing my wife and I to discuss goals in a way we haven't often done.

I know she wants to travel more and raised the possibility of "retiring" the two older horses and selling Bandit. She countered that I'd have a big hole in my life without the horses. The possibility of boarding them instead of keeping them at home interested her (makes travel easier). We both think that if we could find pasture for them to live in, then finding someone who could keep an eye on them for a week at a time would be much easier than here - where caring for them included feeding 3 times a day and scooping poop a couple of times daily!

She also said she gets scared riding horses in the desert but enjoys riding them in the mountains, and even if we just hauled them up into the mountains a half dozen times a year and rode them there, she'd consider that a good return on the cost of the horses.

For over 30 years, our lives have revolved around raising kids. It is 'unsettling', yet a bit exciting, to contemplate life where getting kids off to school each day isn't a factor! Fortunately, I'm starting this new phase with my best friend as my wife...who is uncommonly understanding about horses.


Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #2556 of 3028 Old 11-20-2018, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hondo View Post
@SueC Can't just go traipsing around in Monument Valley. It is reservation land.
Which at least means he could ask nicely. If Monument Valley were in Australia, it would be National Park and therefore, no dogs or horses allowed by law, and you can't ask anyone nicely about that. You could only take a dog like this, for instance:



Have you got dog and horse bans in every square inch of US National Parks too?

@bsms , it's great to see that someone is using satellite imagery to help them decide where they might like to live! Only horse riders, hikers, mountain bikers and other outdoor folk would think like that. I've spent time living in Perth (for senior school/university) and other depressing landscapes, and to me anyway, the natural environment is so important for how I feel. (@Hondo, I've now managed to spend several years not visiting our state capital! It's like a competition down here: "I've not been to Perth for five years!" - "Oh yeah? Well, I've not been to Perth for eight years!" - "Oh yeah? Well, I've not been to Perth this whole millennium.")

That sounds like such fun, chariot races in the snow. At my university, the main sport was drinking competitions, where throwing up the beer didn't necessarily eliminate a contestant, as long as they caught all of it and drank it again. There's no puke emoji here, but yechhhhh. I didn't participate and neither of us understand that mentality. We'll have a nice cider in summer after working hard outdoors, or strawberries in red wine, but to imbibe like a lot of Australians do is just anathema to us. Drink till you throw up and then have a hangover? As a hobby?

Those photos and satellite images look so promising. And you don't really thrill to riding in a monotonous place with heat, rocks, cacti and rubbish bins - how great will it be to ride in wonderful scenery? This is going to be a very exciting next step! And you'll just know when you've found the right place.

Moving is a pain in the posterior. But living in a great place you won't have to move from again is fabulous. And down-sizing frees up time, energy and money. Instead of two bedrooms you'll never need, you can have pasture etc, and probably spare change as well... you could also easily live off-grid like us and never pay another electricity bill... and have a house that heats and cools itself naturally... I'm sending positive vibes from the Antipodes for your move.

@gottatrot , you're an excellent host indeed. Thanks for the coffee!
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post #2557 of 3028 Old 11-20-2018, 08:20 PM
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@SueC Dogs and horses allowed in most National Parks but with more restrictions than the National Forrest. Th degree of restrictions seem to be influenced by the usage density.

@bsms Here's another link set at 10+ acres land only and $100k max. The map on the left can be zoomed in or out and the red dots will show price if hovered. If left clicked while hovering the details will open.

Would require a lot of walking to pick up poop twice a day on 160 acres.

I'm not super skilled at this, just been spending a couple hours per day at it for the last month or so.

https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sal...183_rect/7_zm/

I think it important to always be mindful that the horse actually owes us nothing at all and it is we who owe the horse. "It's a goal"
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post #2558 of 3028 Old 11-20-2018, 08:53 PM
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@SueC Dogs and horses allowed in most National Parks but with more restrictions than the National Forrest. The degree of restrictions seem to be influenced by the usage density.
Now I'm definitely jealous!

I understand that people don't want dogs and horses running over places willy-nilly, and that dogs can interfere with the breeding propensities of our native wildlife (many birds won't breed near tracks with regular dog walking - but I've yet to see the breakdown of how much of that is the dog, and how much the humans...).

However - it seems to me our Parks authorities mostly do this to avoid getting sued in case someone gets bitten by someone else's dog in a National Park. A couple of years ago, an interstate tourist was carrying his tiny Chihuahua up Bluff Knoll and got stopped, reprimanded and turned around by the ranger... Personally I think some people's kids are a greater hazard to wildlife, peace and quiet than a lot of dogs are... My dog doesn't tear branches off trees, run around hollering, leave lolly wrappers, tissue paper and uncovered droppings all over the place, etc etc etc...

In Scotland, from what I've heard, people are free to take their dogs hiking anywhere on the national estate - obviously under control etc (not necessarily on a leash). I sometimes wish I lived in Scotland. I hate leaving our dog home, and I have to admit I've snuck her in, in some off-the-beaten-track walks we've done - and she's not caused trouble. Obviously I can't take her where there's any public users other than ourselves. If I was single and solo, I'd take her on a leash every time, must admit, just for added protection (from humans of course).

There you go - I've admitted my law-breaking propensities....

What would you all (anyone reading) do?


Quote:
Would require a lot of walking to pick up poop twice a day on 160 acres.
Do you have any effective dung beetles in US agricultural zones?

SueC is time travelling.
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post #2559 of 3028 Old 11-20-2018, 09:13 PM
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I’d break the rules too, but nowhere I have gone has had a no dog or horse rule. I have been a place with a leash rule, but there were many people visitors. I kept the dog leashed.

Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaam’s Donkey
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post #2560 of 3028 Old 11-21-2018, 06:22 AM Thread Starter
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Fun conversation. We keep it in mind that we might move to a more remote area someday. People are moving up here from California at a rather alarming rate, escaping the higher crime, traffic, high taxes, and fires. We love the beach and the weather, but we don't care to be around too many people.

@bsms, that area by Bryce and Zion is so beautiful! That would be amazing if you could live there. The big changes you are going through sound stressful, but things like that can make life so interesting too.

@SueC, it's kind of a joke most places around here where there are "rules" about dogs. No one follows them and they don't fund staff to enforce the rules, so basically it's a free for all. I'd rather err on that side than have everything over-regulated like in some states. We've been to beaches in other states and countries where dogs were kept on leashes...that seems so wrong to me. Roaming free on a beach is dog heaven.

It might seem odd but I get nervous sometimes when the vet is coming to see a horse. I've been a little worried about Hero's appointment.
When I told the barn owner I was having a vet visit, she decided to ask if the vet could do our fall vaccines for all the horses. So we had eight horses tied up at the lower barn when the vet arrived.

Nala's owner was working, so I brought Nala down. Since there were no horses in the field, I left Amore's gate open, planning to bring the horses back in through there. When I started bringing Nala back up the hill after her shot, Hero decided to miss her and was stomping around at the tie rack. He tried to go down and roll but his lead was too short. The vet's assistant went over to try to sort him out, and he struck out toward her with his front hoof. I was appalled, and the barn owner offered to take Nala from me and bring her back up to the field so I could go reprimand my horse.

Apparently, the barn owner went in through the front gates and didn't notice Amore's gate was open. So Nala went into the field and came right back out. When I came up with another horse, the barn owner was retrieving Nala from where she'd wandered off to the far side of the property.

The shots were finished, and all the horses back up the hill except Hero and Amore. The vet and assistant were a little unnerved by Hero's energy level that was now coming back down, and the vet said she wasn't sure about the stifle xrays. They require a lot of standing in the horse's kicking range. She asked if she could give him some ACE and I said sure.

Hero was still fairly energetic but his eyes got droopy after the ACE, and we did some trotting out and flexion tests. The vet decided to use some real sedation for the xrays, so I was glad we could get them done.

I'd sort of thought through all the possible scenarios, and what we found was my second best choice (first would be that every joint was perfect). The xrays showed that he did not have any bony lesions or OCD problems, or serious arthritis. The right stifle, which is the one I've thought was the worst, showed the tiniest speck of possible arthritis, and the right hock showed also the beginning stages of arthritis. The vet said that would be from compensating for the stifles over time.

She noticed how he does not put the stifle through the whole range of motion when he trots, and how he is sticky starting into a gait. She did not get the stifle to pop in the classic way, but when he was under sedation and relaxed, the assistant was holding the xray plate and his stifle had apparently been stuck because it popped out toward the assistant, startling her.
If you haven't seen how this looks, here is how it looks when it's the "classic" catch which is a stage worse than Hero normally exhibits. His is more of a light catch/delayed release of the tendon, which makes him sore as it drags over the bone over and over but is not visible.

The vet thought it suspicious that he was not raced until 5, and that maybe he had more serious stifle lock when he was younger, since many horses get better after growing. She thought perhaps they used drugs to help him race and then gave up on him.

The vet kept saying that Hero was very fit, and that she didn't think I could do any more in that department. The issue is that he is athletic enough to compensate and avoid using his stifles as much as possible, because they get sore. This means that even though his body is fit, those quad muscles are still not fit enough to help the tendon not catch. The phase one plan is to put him on Equioxx (anti-inflammatory pain pill) and then do stifle injections next week. Possibly if we get the pain and inflammation to go away he will use the stifles enough to where the muscles build up and prevent the catching.

If that doesn't work, we can try the Estrogen or blistering, and if all else fails he can go get surgery on the tendons. I'm very glad to be working on things at this point, and we might prevent progression of the minor hock arthritis if we get him using his body right. The vet says if we can get this resolved, there will be nothing wrong with him to where he shouldn't do hard work. If there is a little chronic tendon inflammation that goes away with the Equioxx, she said there would be no harm in having him just stay on it to help him keep his joints healthy.

It's tricky because you don't know if a horse has a somewhat minor problem they are rather hysterical about (bucking and such), or they have a very major problem they are being stoic about. Having the studies done helps me feel more secure about how to proceed, and hopeful that Hero could get to feeling much better.
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