Why I Gotta Trot - Page 310 - The Horse Forum
 12843Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #3091 of 3134 Old 08-22-2019, 02:03 AM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,753
• Horses: 2
This might be a weird post.

I had a bizarre dream that Secretariat's owner came to talk to me about Hero. Turns out, when he was young, he had been Horse of the Year, and she showed me his pictures on the cover of magazines and also videos of him riding in parades. She said they had always known he had stifle issues, so he was either great or terrible, depending on how he felt. ?????

On the forum I was drawn in by an apparent troll, and posted responses against my better judgment. In my defense, it was 3-4 in the morning, sitting bored while patients snored. Yeah, that's no excuse. The subject led me to reading more about Tennessee Walking Horses, and now I am wondering if that breed has the distinction of being the most abused out of all the horse breeds. It has been a while since I have made myself look at what they do to these horses.

We recently had a discussion on here about Safesport, and last night I saw a 20/20 program about the gymnasts abused by Nasser that made me outraged and disgusted that so many young people had to go through the abuse, and how the adults did not protect them. DH and I talked about how many times we'd seen at least minor abuse in sport, and agreed that creating something like Safesport was necessary.

Perhaps we are making progress regarding humans, but what about the animals? It also bothers me extremely that the people showing Tennessee Walking Horses in Big Lick competitions are not imprisoned (or tortured) for their extreme animal abuse.
Despite legislation, this is still going on today. I know, I'm not naive, there is horse tripping, dog fighting and cock fighting, but these shows are going on in the open, not just in secret, hidden pits. You could actually go attend a show and see this.
The horse that was posted about on the forum here was apparently suffering from poor breeding and usage to the extent that I thought she must have some debilitating disease or injury. From what I've read since then, in an attempt to get the extreme gaiting, these horses are intentionally bred with lax tendons to the point where their legs can bow out at the joints or collapse.

A few years ago, I was looking for a boarding barn and came across a beautiful property that was a TWH facility. When I went inside on a sunny day, it was to see that the acres of surrounding green pastures were untouched by horse hoof and all the stalls were full. The horses could not see out of the stalls, it was very dark in the building, and all the horses wore harnesses with tail set braces. I have never seen such dead eyes, and every once in awhile the silence was broken by the sound of cribbing.

What gets me is the temperament of these horses. How can they keep trying for the riders, despite the pain, despite the insanity of it all, with nothing in it for the horse? I can't imagine how dangerous many horses would get if you tried to impose this on them.
People are so vocal about "horse breaking," and everyone says we are for gentling nowadays, etc. But this is the true horse breaking that is still going on today. Literally breaking the horses in spirit and body.
bsms, SueC, knightrider and 3 others like this.
gottatrot is offline  
post #3092 of 3134 Old 08-22-2019, 11:19 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: southern Arizona
Posts: 11,857
• Horses: 4
Kind of hard to like your post, gottatrot. I think I'd favor strapping weights to every person there and then using an electric cattle prod to make them 'canter' across the desert. Or just dump them in the ocean for the crabs to eat.

My problem with SafeSport is their secrecy and rules of evidence. Having someone do an initial investigation to see if something MAY be going on is probably good, although I always wonder where the parents are. Trying to investigate something that happened, if at all, 30 years ago bothers me, as does having the investigators judging the 'trial'. Sad to say, but I now think children (below 18) should have PE classes and/or PLAY. "Organized sports" increasingly look like targets for predators.

Even our small church now requires background checks on ANYONE who will teach or even help out with children's church. We also require two adults. If we don't have two adults available - small church - we just don't do "X". And our policy is for suspicions to be reported to the police for investigation. A couple of years after we adopted that policy, our insurance company told us it would be required for continuing insurance.

I do not understand how "Big Lick" riding is legal. Seems like obvious abuse to me. But a lot of horse riding lessons also strike me wrong. Shouldn't we train new riders to think of the horse as their FRIEND first and foremost? And who would kick their friend every step along the way?

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
bsms is offline  
post #3093 of 3134 Old 08-25-2019, 12:24 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 2,439
• Horses: 4
I agree with bsms with safesport. Im not in the US, so it doesnt affect me but it disgusts me that they dont require much more than heresay to start an investigation without a time limit. Where is the evidence to the claims? I think there always needs real evidence before an investigation or someone's life is ruined based on heresay. I had a friend who was definitely innocent accused of raping a woman he had been consensually engaged with for months but because she was married and got caught. She accused him of rape. He had a whole investigation, lost his job and it ruined his career. He's a registered sex offender, even though he DID NOT rape her. And I know that guy. He's a bit of a sleeze but he's not the type to play woman. He's pretty straight up about what the deal is and if they want to engage, he does and if not there's more.

Point being a false accusation gives a lot of power to the accuser and not a lot of protection for someone possibly falsely accused. I've heard people say, who makes stuff like that up? A lot of people if it benefits them and some people are just plain vicious and will make sh!t up about people for the fun of it.

I also DO NOT understand how big lick riding is legal, to me it is obvious horse abuse and obvious pain. I dont hate saddleseat, depending on how the horse is trained. Some things I've seen is truly heinous. I've gone to a lot of different yards, the harshest training methods I think Ive seen in person have been from western pleasure riders. Not all are bad but Ive seen some really ugly stuff. I've seen some really ugly stuff in dressage too. I get horses having moments, disagreements and things and sometimes training isnt pretty but then there is abuse and bad, unfair treatment and that is where I get upset. In Germany I saw a GP rider on an upper level horse miss the hind end in the change, So she whipped that horse into the tiniest circle possible, chasing it, digging her spur in and out and cranking it's nose to her knee. Then went on. That I didnt think was cool. She didnt spare her whip either. I saw another rider who puzzled me. I've never seen someone not move and yet come off a horse with blood from the mouth and blood on the sides. And he was the nicest, gentlest man. I dont get it. But he was super strong, his thighs were the size of my waist. But you'd see him ride and his leg and hands were so still and quiet, yet there was blood.

I am so amazed by the temperaments of the horse's that take that but then again, I usually got the rejects who had been thrown out of training programs because they wouldn't tolerate it and were written off as bad. And for a long while I was too poor to own a horse, so I chance rode whatever I could get and it was usually throw aways. So like you it astonishes me the amount of abuse and pressure horses will take. A saddleseat trainer who did morgans once told me, people think saddlebreds are such naughty horses yet look at how much they put up with?
bsms, gottatrot, SueC and 2 others like this.
DanteDressageNerd is online now  
post #3094 of 3134 Old 08-25-2019, 02:10 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Hildreth, FL
Posts: 2,399
• Horses: 5
I was once getting a horse from a rescue called Horse Protection Association of Florida and working with their trainer to prove I could handle the horse. He had been abused badly.

The trainer said, "You know why Pasos are so badly abused?" I said, "No, why?" She said, "Because you can. You can't get away with that kind of treatment with Arabs or Thoroughbreds. They'd kill you."

Some of those gaited breeds are so so sweet. The Paso I did get from HPAF was so loving and giving. You would never have known that he was so badly beaten that his owner was thrown in jail.
bsms, gottatrot, SueC and 2 others like this.
knightrider is offline  
post #3095 of 3134 Old 08-30-2019, 02:23 AM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,753
• Horses: 2
Whew, had to work pretty hard this last weekend. Ended up having to sleep quite a lot to catch up. More than 12,000 people came into the area for a relay race, and sometimes it is simply amazing how well the athletes take care of themselves. This year was apparently deceptive, and I think it's because once people got over the mountains the temperature seemed cooler compared to the heat of the valley. Yet it has been very humid this year, and I guess people sweated more and drank less than they should have because there was a lot of rhabdomyolysis.

Tomorrow I will probably ride three horses. My coworker says her new horse, Bandit has been giving her some trouble when she tries to take him out alone. This has been making her nervous, so she has asked me to ride him. I'm also planning to ride Nickel, and then later go out on Hero with Nala. Hopefully all that will work out.

I have some pretty bad equitation pictures to post on here soon, of me on Nickel trying to sort out his gaits. I was glad Nickel's rider took the pictures since it's great to have some insight into what you are doing wrong. In contrast, I took some video of her riding him and she looks great.

It's a little sad since in a couple of weeks, Nala's rider plans to move her two horses to a barn out in the country, closer to her new place where she will be living this winter. I've started looking for a horse trailer, so hopefully we can still arrange to meet up for rides frequently.

Some thoughts from a post I made on Dantedressagenerd's journal:
Quote:
You can't truly "restart" a horse. That's something I've been thinking about. I was watching some trainers starting horses, and I was realizing you can only give a horse new knowledge, you can't take old knowledge away.

The horse that knows he can run through a bit and take off will never unlearn that. You can give him new information to build on, such as that he can trust you and you won't scare him, so eventually he won't feel the need to do that anymore. Or maybe you will give him the belief that a certain bit can hold him back. But you can't just take him into the arena and "start over" with the basics and have that old information disappear out of his head. He'll never be the same as a horse that had no bad start, no poor treatment, and no bad memories.

But I almost feel like it's the opposite of what people say. They talk about horses that have missed steps, or holes in their training. So they say you should restart the horse. To me it's not like you're starting over from the beginning and filling in the gaps, it's more like you're unbuilding the horse. Before you give him new information such as trust and calmness, you have to get rid of the fear, the anger, the reactions to pain or poor handling.

The horse will already have the information he's been given. You can't start from scratch, because he's already got building blocks in place. He'll keep all the blocks he already has, but what you have to do is take them down and rearrange them so they make a nicer structure.
It really almost feels like a puzzle sometimes. You're finding one piece that is important such as the horse has some underlying pain, or he protested but no one listened before. Moving that one piece is helpful, but sometimes you don't see how it changes the whole picture for quite a while.

Like with Hero, there were so many pieces! His pain, his reaction to the pain, how he felt about people reacting to his reaction....etc.

It can take a horse a long time to understand that they don't have to react the same way anymore. Last night I took Hero and Amore out for a walk around the property, and Hero just walked with us. He didn't prance, he didn't pin his ears, he didn't try to bite me, he didn't make faces at Amore, he didn't rear or try to spin off and run when faced with a steep downhill.
So many small changes, but they lead to big things.

@lostastirrup said it took three years for her to see big changes in her horse. With Amore it was about the same, and with Halla at least two.
I really like what was said here:
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostastirrup
I was talking with a friend of mine, and we were talking about clever damaged horses, I told her it had honestly taken me 3 years to get Nick sorted out, and she said that with her mare it was similar, four years of work before the horse settled and wanted to work with her. I think Wonder is super smart and has his attitude, but he also probably didn't get consist kind work until he came to you, Nick I don't think was beat up more than is usual in Western horse starting tradition, but he carried the resentment and the fear for awhile because it was too much for his sensitivity. I think about your gallop and him deciding to come back, and not overpowering you even though he could, and it reminds why the partnership is probably the most important part of training/developing a horse, that and being able to meet the horse where they are at mentally and emotionally. I think a lot of horses that get passed around would have turned out broke and good if the riders and trainers had had some patience to ride through what the horse dealt out while it was trying to process.
bsms, Dragoon, SueC and 3 others like this.
gottatrot is offline  
post #3096 of 3134 Old 08-30-2019, 04:11 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Cariboo, British Columbia
Posts: 13,629
• Horses: 3
Broke doesn't been broken spirit or body. Broke means breaking the resistance, therefore the horse gives to pressure. Horse gives to pressure of the bit, gives to pressure of your legs, gives to pressure of a lead role, etc. A truly broke horse will give to pressure, example, you should be able to move a horse right over with one finger on his side and pushing it, he feels that pressure and he will move away from it. Breaking a horse's spirit and body is not broke that's abuse.

I am not here to promote anythingNo, that's not true, I am here to promote everything equestrian and everyone enjoying horses!
waresbear is offline  
post #3097 of 3134 Old 08-30-2019, 12:06 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: southern Arizona
Posts: 11,857
• Horses: 4
I agree about holes and retraining. Bandit will never unlearn bucking. At best, he has learned there are more productive ways to communicate frustration. But if someone tried to whip him into obedience, I'd bet he'd start bucking pronto! Mia learned she could ignore a snaffle if she wanted to. Learned not to try it in a curb. Eventually rode her again in snaffles because she had learned she didn't need to run away from scary things. She is now ridden in a bosal in a place where she can see for miles - nothing to fear. I couldn't solve her issues in an arena because she didn't experience them there.

A hole in training is something you want the horse to do that the horse has never learned. Like asking Bandit to change leads. I don't care so he doesn't know. A hole to some people. Something not worth bothering with to me.

Or a hole in training is a trained bad response. Bandit bucking when frustrated because it was the only way he could get attention. Now he has alternatives that gets him what he wants with less drama. So he uses them instead.

I think it is more productive to think of teaching a horse than breaking it. When possible, you don't break down a horse's resistance. You teach it that resistance is silly, not futile. When possible. Although that sometimes requires going toe to hoof with the horse. A horse who has always chosen Gate A may need to have Gate A blocked before he will learn to choose Gate B. But the goal is to get the horse thinking cooperation is pleasant, not that resistance is futile.

Quote:
"So, how should I have obtained the response? He didn't listen to my light leg pressure. Why shouldn't I use more if he fails to respond? Well, because of what I just said. Harder and harder pressure makes him more nervous. The way to get him to move is not to bang on his sides, but to 'pester' him until he moves.

I have never read any book about riding that talks about 'pestering' a horse. They always use the terms like 'Apply the aids,' as if the horse will magically understand what the heck that means.

But think. Why does a horse swish his tail at a fly? Because the horse knows the fly will bite him if he doesn't get rid of the **** thing. The horse is not terrified by the fly. The fly isn't an attacking mountain lion. It isn't even a stinging wasp. It's a fly. Even an annoying fly will get a horse to respond, but it is not a panicked response.

In a way, we riders need to be mildly annoying flies..." - Denny Emerson, Know Better to Do Better, Mistakes I Made With Horses (So You Don't Have To)

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
bsms is offline  
post #3098 of 3134 Old 08-31-2019, 03:33 AM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,753
• Horses: 2
Rode the 3 horses today.

Rating them for fun/enjoyable ride:

Bandit - 3 - Too many issues, mainly physical.
Nickel - 8 - Great ride.
Hero - 7 - Not quite as great "all around" as Nickel, but some antics got me laughing so he gained marks for individual style.

First up: Bandit

Brought him out, put his big western saddle on. As with every horse I thought english would be better, but that's not what anyone, ever has ridden him in and I'm doing an eval/exercise for his owner so it's not about me.

The barn owner was around, she had done a lot of training on him. I said his owner was having some issues, her opinion was he just needed more frequent riding. Probably correct. She helped me understand that his browband was not actually a snug fit, it was meant to be a one-ear headstall. Ha ha! Poor horse, I had him squished in there.

Walked Bandit into the arena, his head went up almost higher than he could put it and eyes looked startled. I wasn't quite sure about that since he has two blue eyes, which throws me off. I led him around a minute and he snorted loudly at the golf cart going around outside, which told me I was reading his eyes correctly.

Despite his anxiety, he did not zoom or jump anywhere, so I got on. The saddle was comfy, and he was going in an S-hack. Later I heard he had not been ridden much in a hackamore, but he neck reined well most of the time. I rode two handed for backup in case he shot off somewhere. He felt very slightly off, and I'd noticed his hooves were needing a trim and also had icky frogs full of thrush. Still, he jogged around at what he probably considered a good pace but then he started roaring a bit. It was fairly quiet so I wasn't sure at first, but he definitely has some kind of airway issue.

I could feel he was well trained and probably just needed more exercise. He picked up the lead I asked at the lope, very smoothly, but after a few strides tripped on the slightly off foot so I stopped him. Took him outside to the grassy outdoor ring, and he felt less anxious out there, but also wanted to go back to the other horses. When he turned a direction I didn't ask, I turned him back, and felt him building up some angst. I waited for something to happen, being quite used to Hero nowadays. He moved a hoof sideways and gave his head a shake. That was it? Yep. So I had him jog around a bit more.

Bandit moved better after warming up so I was less concerned, but he was sweating and continued to roar some, even at the walk. My thoughts for my friend are that the vet should take a listen to his breathing - I wouldn't feel comfortable trying to work on fitness unless told the roaring was minor enough. With his training and docile personality a little regular work along with a curb which he is more used to would make him quite easy.

I let the barn owner know about his mild lameness and she said that hoof always bothers him when he is due for a trim. She's trying to gradually improve the angles - it's rather clubby. My guess is the thrush gets worse in the crack as the heels get longer too.

Nickel:
First here is a photo from the other day. Some great equitation! Asked for a big trot, then tried to organize it too late. Lurching forward, collapsing through my waist and wrists as my lower leg slides back. Nice. But I ask you, does the horse look happy?

Here we are looking better. Still poor wrists/lost connection to core.

I was lecturing myself heavily about my own riding, which was good. On the video I made of Nickel's rider, she looked much better. Notice how her hands make a straight line to the bit.

Today I had a better time riding Nickel, and realized some things which made me a little less self-critical. One is I realized how long he takes to warm up, and then he is easier. He has a very long back. Also the reins are just bad for my hands, too bulky. I have to hold them oddly, which is why I was bending my wrists. Was able to correct that today when thinking about it. I also thinks it takes a little more core strength for me since he is a bigger horse compared to my size.

Anyway, when I tacked him up his hooves also were thrushy looking. I'm hypervigilant of my own horses' frogs, but it's worse with these shod horses. More trapping of moisture.

But why the 7? Nickel is a versatile boy and I enjoy him a lot. Warmed him up in the indoor, and did some quick transitions. He tried so hard with everything, and was able to do some great ones. I had him gathered up when I asked for the canter, and he collected up so much it felt like we were barely going forward, just leaping up in the air. But super smooth too. Wow.

Then I rode him down the road to our barn, and met up with Nala's rider on Nala. We burned up a couple hills, super fun and good for Nickel's strengthening. Then did a few big loops around the property trails. Nala's rider was just saying how good she was being when she popped up and down, catching her rider in the face and then flashing both hind hooves at Nickel. We decided Nickel should lead. He just strode out on the trails and took everything at a lovely pace. Great inside, great outside. The only place he has been strong so far is the beach. Understandable.

AND the Hero boy:

He started out very calm and slow. We did some trotting and cantering around the property trails, and blasted up some of the same hills as we did with Nickel. Very fun. We'd ridden both horses back to Nickel's barn, I untacked him, and then Nala went back to our barn for more exercise with Hero.

I had to give him one less point than Nickel because he had times where he walked slowly and needed some incentive to go. Finally he got into it. Then, the funny part was near the end of the trail where he got to "Tantering." That's what I call it. He honestly does have little tantrums. He was breaking into a trot when he felt like it to catch up with Nala. So I started making him wait a few seconds longer, and then trot when I asked instead. The second time I held him back, when I asked him to trot he leaped through the air and after that for about ten minutes spent a lot of time "tantering." That is a canter that is much too round and hoppy and tending to go sideways to be a good, proper canter. Basically jigging at the canter.

Well, I laughed at him and had to smack him one with the crop, but soon he got over it and he is certainly calming quickly nowadays. The tantrums are getting shorter. During the tantering I used the extra lift and energy to make him go laterally and around little bushes in the path. Good exercise.

Back at the barn we let both horses loose at the bottom of the hill and watched them gallop up. Even though they are "free," they don't know what to do at the top since they are thinking about their dinner and the other horses come out to the fences to see what is up. So they always just stop and play squealing games with the other horses.

Ahhh, why do I work...would be nice to just ride multiple horses every day.
bsms, waresbear, Dragoon and 5 others like this.
gottatrot is offline  
post #3099 of 3134 Old 08-31-2019, 05:30 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 2,439
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post

It really almost feels like a puzzle sometimes. You're finding one piece that is important such as the horse has some underlying pain, or he protested but no one listened before. Moving that one piece is helpful, but sometimes you don't see how it changes the whole picture for quite a while.

Like with Hero, there were so many pieces! His pain, his reaction to the pain, how he felt about people reacting to his reaction....etc.

It can take a horse a long time to understand that they don't have to react the same way anymore. Last night I took Hero and Amore out for a walk around the property, and Hero just walked with us. He didn't prance, he didn't pin his ears, he didn't try to bite me, he didn't make faces at Amore, he didn't rear or try to spin off and run when faced with a steep downhill.
So many small changes, but they lead to big things.

@lostastirrup said it took three years for her to see big changes in her horse. With Amore it was about the same, and with Halla at least two.
I really like what was said here:

I really agree about finding pieces and constantly finding more layers. It's deeper than a simple "pain" issue but pain can be a factor, it's psychological and emotional. I really think when it comes to these traumatized horses it is more than a "pain" issue. I think a lot of times people think it can all be solved with a diagnosis and I dont think that is the case. I think these horses also have built up resentment, anger, fear, and other defense mechanisms for self protection. They know things a horse with a "clean slate" does not. I know myself because I have been hit by men, I have a reaction of fear I cannot control when I sense anger in a man and I prepare to defend myself. The body and mind react to memory, I think horses can experienced PTSD and develop different coping mechanisms. Some react in fear and try to get away and others act in aggression like you know what NO, I dont accept it and I stand up for myself. I remember I worked for a natural horsemanship and driving trainer who said, it is our responsibility to show the horse we are different. To show the horse we can read energy and interpret their body language and let them let us in. I remember she had a morgan mare who listened only to energy cues and she said I was the only dressage rider she's put on her who could ride her. And once the mare and I understood each other, she was such a pleasure to ride and work with. That horse really emphasized to me the importance of mental and emotional intent and how to "transfer pictures." I dont know how to explain it, it's a feeling but it's like you project to the horse the expectation and that is what the horse reads.

I also think a lot of horses will tolerate things say Hero or Nick or Wonder will not. I think some horses can go through trauma and not come out dangerous or that traumatized (depending on what they've experienced in life). And I think all 3 of them have different coping mechanisms to their experiences based on their personality, strengths and weaknesses. I think for Wonder, he learned how to use his strength against a rider and to shut them out of his mind and fight when a rider asked something from him. Vs Nick I think learned to be very fearful and emotional to a rider and learned to react, rather than think. I think Hero goes to spooking and acrobatics and his reasoning maybe is between fear and also not comfortable with a rider having that much influence over him. I think the common factor is all 3 lost faith and trust in humans and came up with different mechanisms to protect themselves.

I think when you get a horse with an unknown past that has been passed around because it's been labeled "dangerous" and "bad" then you sort of have to accept the horse with the baggage and accept the project. I also think when it's emotional and psychological damage, it takes years to really see the deep changes IF at all. And I really admire and like that you take these horses on too. A lot of people just dont want to deal with it and say pass it on but never think about where these horse's end up. But I also think people dont have the skill or patience to work with these horses. I think when people dont get an immediate result, they give up. And often times their trainers dont have a clue how to work with the horse or problem solve. Or a trainer knows what they're doing but the client is angry because the horse isnt "fixed" with 30 or 90 days because the problem is deeper than the owner realizes. So they pass through trainers.

I know when I bought Wonder, I bought him from a good owner who had done a lot of work with Wonder. He said he turned down 8 or 9 different buyers who had more money than me because he said they weren't rightfor Wonder and that Wonder is special and would end up abused if placed wrong. At the time I didnt quite understand what he meant, I just thought he was concerned for his horse's welfare but now I know what he meant. Wonder is something someone who doesnt know what they're doing could make absolutely unmanagable and run the show. He is so clever, strong and willful and if he knows he can be in charge, he will. Or if someone was rough with him, he could be made very aggressive, mean and nasty. And I know had he ended up somewhere else, he would have passed hands until he ended up in a kill shelter. And I KNOW for dressage most dressage riders cant ride him or get any kind of quality from him. I put a PSG rider who made her own horse and she could not steer or get Wonder on the bit at all.

Like with Hero, I have never once looked and thought I could do better. I thought it was interesting to see your approach with Hero and the steps you were taking with him to bring him where you and him want to be. And I could appreciate the work you do with him because it's nice to know other people are working through problems too and step by step making their peace. I appreciate people who "get it" and I appreciate their way. Might not be the same as me but I think different approaches work better for different horses, riders and situations. Many roads to Rome!

I also agree with bsms about it really depends on what your end goals are for example my goal is to produce a GP dressage horse but my plan is not going to be the same as somebody else. It doesnt make my goal better or worse, just different. I dont look down on anyone because they dont have the same goals, not every horse needs to be a GP horse and not every horse needs to be a dressage horse. Point being I think different disciplines have different end goals and different methods. It doesnt make one necessarily better or worse, just different. And like bsms said, Bandit doesnt need to know how to do a flying change so why teach it?

I think there are many different types of horses and riders and thank God we're all not the same. Because it gives everyone the opportunity to find where they fit best and are happy.

I also spoke with the farrier this week about the hoof structure, how they shoe and leg conformation, even within the same discipline depending on goals. Like young horse champions tend to be very long through the pastern to get that big swooping, floaty motion but they cannot collect or stay sound doing high work long term. Different conformations, brains and types based on "purpose." But in regards to hooves, this is what he said, "if I can look at my own work and not find fault then I have grown too arrogant."
bsms, gottatrot, Dragoon and 4 others like this.

Last edited by DanteDressageNerd; 08-31-2019 at 05:39 AM.
DanteDressageNerd is online now  
post #3100 of 3134 Old 08-31-2019, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,753
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanteDressageNerd View Post
But in regards to hooves, this is what he said, "if I can look at my own work and not find fault then I have grown too arrogant."
Very good insights. I quite like this quote. With horses you can never feel like you have arrived. There is always more to learn, and always ways to improve. And I also agree there are many methods that can work well for horses. If I gave Hero to @Knave , he'd be working differently, but I have no doubt what she did would work and it would be good for him.

And now, I saw this on FB and said "Oh no!" DH already teases me about watching the gruesome and senseless violence of the John Wick movies. But you have to admit it's pretty interesting watching Reeves learning to ride a horse. Hero could easily learn that trick of kicking out on command. I didn't realize it could be so useful around bad guys.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=G0uNA6TzPB8
bsms, SueC, knightrider and 2 others like this.
gottatrot is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
You GOTTA see these!! : ) crackrider Horse Videos 8 11-28-2017 05:58 AM
Saddlebred Natural Trot vs. High Motion trained Trot 166714 Horse Training 7 06-03-2015 06:41 AM
English trot vs. German trot? Luce73 Horse Riding & Horse Activity 13 01-17-2014 11:19 AM
I gotta do this. equiniphile Horse Talk 11 07-20-2011 04:24 PM
Is it correct to sit trot over trot poles? pcmum Horse Riding Critique 5 04-23-2009 09:24 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome