2.5 years and FINALLY a break through in join up (long) - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 22 Old 09-17-2015, 10:16 PM Thread Starter
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2.5 years and FINALLY a break through in join up (long)

Might not mean a lot to a lot of people..but to me it means the world

My little mare is very either nervous/stubborn or just totally stupid. Either way, she has never joined up with me and can be bothersome to catch and in general shes on edge, but anytime i need her in i walk to her and she runs to the stable so is CAUGHT.

After an incident where she got into a paddock beside the stallion/gelding (who tried to kill eachother) and would NOT be caught or chased out for a good hour or more i finally decided to do something.

Firstly, i exercised her cause she has so much energy. Got her back into her driving. Next week or so, i did some ground work - backing up, stepping forward, side stepping (before she would always lean into you never step away)

Secondly, back in the round pen, chasing her and trying to change her directions. This worked with just a look, shes always done that. Hence the nervous attitude? I didn't find this helped at all. (worked with all my others)

Thirdly, saw an inspirational video which was a type of natural horsemanship but just slightly different. I altered it ever so slightly to myself (my mare is small, so when the method called for stopping, i hit the ground in a haunch) as soon as she looked at me with two eyes i got up and walked away to the other side of the pen and started walking around the outside to her back end. She would either move off (start over) or stand (gave her a scratch and turned her via halter towards me then walked away)

3rd method WORKED in literally 20mins. I could not believe it. i actually cried...

In this photo, she is facing the center AND me. For the first time ever. Normally she is faced the wall, or at most diagonal but always butt to the center never looking to me..


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post #2 of 22 Old 09-17-2015, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldilocks View Post
Might not mean a lot to a lot of people..but to me it means the world

My little mare is very either nervous/stubborn or just totally stupid. Either way, she has never joined up with me and can be bothersome to catch and in general shes on edge, but anytime i need her in i walk to her and she runs to the stable so is CAUGHT.

After an incident where she got into a paddock beside the stallion/gelding (who tried to kill eachother) and would NOT be caught or chased out for a good hour or more i finally decided to do something.

Firstly, i exercised her cause she has so much energy. Got her back into her driving. Next week or so, i did some ground work - backing up, stepping forward, side stepping (before she would always lean into you never step away)


(my mare is small, so when the method called for stopping, i hit the ground in a haunch)




What does this mean?
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post #3 of 22 Old 09-17-2015, 10:31 PM
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Whoops, only meant to use the last part of the quote. I don't understand what you mean by you hit the ground in a haunch.....
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post #4 of 22 Old 09-18-2015, 02:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Goldilocks View Post
My little mare is very either nervous/stubborn or just totally stupid. Either way, she has never joined up with me and can be bothersome to catch and in general shes on edge,
Sounds like you've been looking at it from a skewed perspective to me - you've repeatedly done something(for 2.5 years?) that hasn't worked & made her nervous of you, and you suspect it's because she's stupid/stubborn? I actually suspect it's because you have been doing something wrong, making her nervous. Especially given that when you changed your ways, she suddenly stopped being stubborn/stupid.

Quote:
before she would always lean into you never step away)
So you've just started teaching her to yield to pressure? Yep, good move & that definitely helps her understand that 'pressure' however it's applied, isn't something to be confused or frightened about. I don't advise chasing a horse, especially in a confined enclosure, until they understand this concept/bodylanguage well. You tend to get reactions, rather than responses, when there's fear & confusion.

Don't know what your new 'method' is ~ 'type of NH' could be anything, let alone 'slightly different', but it will generally get you a long way if you understand & focus on the principles at work behind a 'method' rather than just trying to follow certain instructions.
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post #5 of 22 Old 09-18-2015, 02:25 AM
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are you saying you got down in a hunch? is this Klaus Hempfling you are talking about?
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post #6 of 22 Old 09-18-2015, 04:24 AM
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A bit hard to understand your explanation, but if it worked, great!

Now I am dying of curiosity to see a photo of your mare beside a person for scale. The first time I looked at the photo in the round pen I could have sworn it was a mock-up with a toy My Little Pony lol. You say she is small - you bet! - but just how small is small?
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post #7 of 22 Old 09-18-2015, 09:39 AM
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Your mare may have been a bit nervous but she's also smart as she's outsmarted you all this time. Most people when approaching a horse, walk directly towards it. Horse turns it's ear, then it's head then leaves. By circling way around and startling the horse (predator style) the horse figures it's better to keep an eye on you and that is when you get both eyes. Try your method out in the pasture and not within the confines of a pen. You don't have to squat down when you startle her, just waving your arms to startle her and stomping your feet usually works well. BTW when you approach her, the moment she turns an ear away, stop and you look the opposite way. The ear tells you she's thinking of leaving. By your looking away it draws them back. Same if she turns her head away only take a step back as you look away. If she does leave, begin your big circle again. You may not get very far as she'll want to watch you. Just approach again. BTW she should not be wearing a halter as it should be in your left elbow along with the lead in plain sight.



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post #8 of 22 Old 09-18-2015, 07:03 PM
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So can you now walk into the field and catch her?
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post #9 of 22 Old 09-19-2015, 08:41 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kay Armstrong View Post
Whoops, only meant to use the last part of the quote. I don't understand what you mean by you hit the ground in a haunch.....
Means i kneeled down on to my knees, so i was more eye level.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Sounds like you've been looking at it from a skewed perspective to me - you've repeatedly done something(for 2.5 years?) that hasn't worked & made her nervous of you, and you suspect it's because she's stupid/stubborn? I actually suspect it's because you have been doing something wrong, making her nervous. Especially given that when you changed your ways, she suddenly stopped being stubborn/stupid.



So you've just started teaching her to yield to pressure? Yep, good move & that definitely helps her understand that 'pressure' however it's applied, isn't something to be confused or frightened about. I don't advise chasing a horse, especially in a confined enclosure, until they understand this concept/bodylanguage well. You tend to get reactions, rather than responses, when there's fear & confusion.

Don't know what your new 'method' is ~ 'type of NH' could be anything, let alone 'slightly different', but it will generally get you a long way if you understand & focus on the principles at work behind a 'method' rather than just trying to follow certain instructions.
Yep, totally the wrong method for this mare. All the other horses did it the other way. No issues. Tbh not done a whole lot with her cause i DIDN'T want to make her more nervous, but the last straw was this particular incident when not catching her put others in danger.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
are you saying you got down in a hunch? is this Klaus Hempfling you are talking about?
Who? It was my local horse trainer who advised me to do that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bondre View Post
A bit hard to understand your explanation, but if it worked, great!

Now I am dying of curiosity to see a photo of your mare beside a person for scale. The first time I looked at the photo in the round pen I could have sworn it was a mock-up with a toy My Little Pony lol. You say she is small - you bet! - but just how small is small?
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She is 32" to her wither, so approx 7.2hh (ill post a pic after)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag View Post
Your mare may have been a bit nervous but she's also smart as she's outsmarted you all this time. Most people when approaching a horse, walk directly towards it. Horse turns it's ear, then it's head then leaves. By circling way around and startling the horse (predator style) the horse figures it's better to keep an eye on you and that is when you get both eyes. Try your method out in the pasture and not within the confines of a pen. You don't have to squat down when you startle her, just waving your arms to startle her and stomping your feet usually works well. BTW when you approach her, the moment she turns an ear away, stop and you look the opposite way. The ear tells you she's thinking of leaving. By your looking away it draws them back. Same if she turns her head away only take a step back as you look away. If she does leave, begin your big circle again. You may not get very far as she'll want to watch you. Just approach again. BTW she should not be wearing a halter as it should be in your left elbow along with the lead in plain sight.
I tried walking every direction, stopping, walking away. She always ran to the gate, but when the gate was not an issue she was impossible to get to. Haltering her was never an issue, she just never let me get near her at al.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
So can you now walk into the field and catch her?
Yep. I have been able to walk right up to her every time now. She will fully turn to me, and let me get her and she has done the turning in and taken a few steps towards me in the pen again. She is in general SO much calmer, and relaxed. Happy horse.


Pic for size relation lol
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post #10 of 22 Old 09-19-2015, 09:48 PM
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Think this is from 'FedUpFred' page...
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