About my new horse April - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 04-06-2020, 05:26 PM Thread Starter
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About my new horse April

Hello, I’m new to this and every one, I’ve took a full time loan on with a new horse called April she’s a Cob & she’s 14.1hh, she’s fantastic so basically as I’m new to her an she’s new to me I’m bonding first, small walks, treats and grooming in the stable, but for the last 2 times now when we leave the farm and get to a part of grass she refuses to leave, and she starts to stomp her left foot at me. And shaking her head as if to say no I’m not moving is this normal? Or should I have anything to worry about? Thank you
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post #2 of 6 Old 04-06-2020, 05:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cody Nicholl View Post
Hello, Im new to this and every one, Ive took a full time loan on with a new horse called April shes a Cob & shes 14.1hh, shes fantastic so basically as Im new to her an shes new to me Im bonding first, small walks, treats and grooming in the stable, but for the last 2 times now when we leave the farm and get to a part of grass she refuses to leave, and she starts to stomp her left foot at me. And shaking her head as if to say no Im not moving is this normal? Or should I have anything to worry about? Thank you

This is barn or buddy souring. Could be either or both. Most horses will act like they're on death's door leaving out, whether being led or ridden. The return trip though?

HEALED! It's a miracle! I even feel like GALLOPING ALL THE WAY BACK!


Is she stomping her foot - or threatening you with a pawing? Two different things.



You're going to have to get her feet moving. She's probably trying you - because right now you're not a herd mate, so she may not feel safe leaving with you. How does she know you'll save her from tigers and bears, after all?


If you lose momentum and a horse digs in, that's it. You're not going anywhere. You have to get her feet to move. Have you tried spinning the rope near her butt to get her to walk forward or in a circle around you?

"We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us."
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post #3 of 6 Old 04-06-2020, 05:36 PM
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i know this is a weird question but could you tell me how much you weigh. I freak out about my weight on my horse. ok, back to you how old are you and April. You are doing the absolute best thing. My quarter horse does this to me. I trained him to not by pulling his head back up and waiting till he stopped fighting me to bring it down once he stoped i let him eat a bit. I did this over and over and he eventually learned. Good luck.
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post #4 of 6 Old 04-06-2020, 07:03 PM
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stomping the foot and shaking her head is a half-hearted threat gesture . It's her expressing her irritation at being asked to leave good grass. Why should she? I mean, she is not on any schedule. she's got her sensitive nose down in fresh grass. Can you imagine how enticing that is?


So, yes, I would address that expression of bad humor. Not like a punishment, but do something big enough to break her out of that thought. I might stomp the ground loudly and hiss at her loudly. and if she jumps back, that's fine. It's about waking her up. Then, move her on to another good place of grass, and let her eat.


If you are going to hand graze, get your horse good and used to being interrupted to move a bit further, then allowed to graze, then interrupted, and on . . etc. This way they know that you aren't stopping the grass, just shifting. The will not worry so much every time you ask them to move away from some place they want to be at.
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post #5 of 6 Old 04-07-2020, 03:24 PM
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I'm assuming you are hand walking and not riding? If so Then Tinyliny gives good advice. You'll still need to work on her respecting your requests and not testing you.

Some horse people change their horse, they change their tack and discipline, they change their instructor; they never change themselves.
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post #6 of 6 Old 04-07-2020, 04:05 PM
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Hi & welcome!

Ditto Tiny above. I make a practice of, whether in hand or riding, to *allow/invite* my horses to graze, but never just *let* them. They are not allowed to do it whenever they like, and they are not allowed to ignore my 'head up' signals, but I will tell them to put their head down for grass, when appropriate.

I say 'head down' & my physical cue, while starting on the ground with a hand behind the poll because that's easiest, I also teach a light squeeze on the base of the neck is the signal, because that's easy when riding.
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