adopting a senior horse - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 11-04-2016, 01:16 AM Thread Starter
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adopting a senior horse

Hi everyone, this is my first post on this site and i have a few questions that need answering.
I do not have a horse right now, I have been taking lessons (once weekly, no discipline yet)with a great trainer. this post may seem a little scatterbrained, sorry in advance!
1) In the future (no time soon as im still learning) i would really like to adopt a senior horse, maybe around 17-20 years old from a rescue agency. My biggest problem is that i have a full time job as a vet tech, i work 5 days a week 11+ hours every day and the only days i have available to ride are wednesday and sunday. occasionally i get a saturday off. I do plan on boarding. I dont know if they include grooming at the ranch i go to, which may be a problem as well. as of right now, riding is a stress relieving hobby. Im taking lessons so i learn good riding and care, but eventually i want to do nothin more than to trail ride a few hours a few times a week, maybe get in some arena riding for 30 minutes every saturday if i can. Would it be a better idea to adopt an older horse who would benefit more from the lighter riding(side note, i only weigh 110 on a bad day, 5'8"), or should i get a younger horse around 10 who i could lease out to someone a few days of the week so they get more exercise? Of course this may change in the future, but my work is so physical and taxing as of right now i feel that i dont want to do much in the way of really intense disciplines.
2) im in the bay area, how much do people around here pay on average for a barefoot trim?
3)My trainer has been working on my form and such, and its a small ranch so she does not have a lot of free time, but i really want to learn more aboput tacking up, grooming, stall cleaning, etc. I am too afraid to ask her because she is always so busy! how do i go about learning this stuff without being a bother to anyone? I am reallllly introverted and self conscious i have a hard time putting myself out there...
Im sure i have more questions but i can't think of any at the moment. Thank you for your time and wisdom!
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post #2 of 11 Old 11-04-2016, 02:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by courtanee View Post
Hi everyone, this is my first post on this site and i have a few questions that need answering.
I do not have a horse right now, I have been taking lessons (once weekly, no discipline yet)with a great trainer. this post may seem a little scatterbrained, sorry in advance!
1) In the future (no time soon as im still learning) i would really like to adopt a senior horse, maybe around 17-20 years old from a rescue agency. My biggest problem is that i have a full time job as a vet tech, i work 5 days a week 11+ hours every day and the only days i have available to ride are wednesday and sunday. occasionally i get a saturday off. I do plan on boarding. I dont know if they include grooming at the ranch i go to, which may be a problem as well. as of right now, riding is a stress relieving hobby. Im taking lessons so i learn good riding and care, but eventually i want to do nothin more than to trail ride a few hours a few times a week, maybe get in some arena riding for 30 minutes every saturday if i can. Would it be a better idea to adopt an older horse who would benefit more from the lighter riding(side note, i only weigh 110 on a bad day, 5'8"), or should i get a younger horse around 10 who i could lease out to someone a few days of the week so they get more exercise? Of course this may change in the future, but my work is so physical and taxing as of right now i feel that i dont want to do much in the way of really intense disciplines.

I think adopting an older been there, done that horse is an excellent start for anyone. As long as the horse has plenty of turnout it should get the exercise it needs to handle the small amount of riding you plan to do.

2) im in the bay area, how much do people around here pay on average for a barefoot trim?

Can't answer that one since I'm nowhere near your area.

3)My trainer has been working on my form and such, and its a small ranch so she does not have a lot of free time, but i really want to learn more aboput tacking up, grooming, stall cleaning, etc. I am too afraid to ask her because she is always so busy! how do i go about learning this stuff without being a bother to anyone? I am reallllly introverted and self conscious i have a hard time putting myself out there...

Ask! If she's that busy she may appreciate the help even if it does take her a few minutes extra to explain things at the beginning.

Im sure i have more questions but i can't think of any at the moment. Thank you for your time and wisdom!
My answers are in red. Welcome to the forum!
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post #3 of 11 Old 11-04-2016, 02:56 AM
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there is so much to love about older horses.


as for the amount of excersize they need, and whether your twice a week will be enough; that depends on how much turn out they get. if the horse is on a real pasture turnout, and better yet, with hills and other horses to move around with, he will self-exersize. you'd probably just be able to drive up , catch him, groom and tack up, just like that. when they have a place to roam and company they tend to be happier and looser all around.

if this is a stall situation, with only a few jhours out, or only on a small dry paddock, then the horse will need more regular riding. maybe, inm that case, you can lease a school horse.

in either case, part leasing can be of benefit because you have another person who is looking out for your hosre. she/he will see if there is a limp, or some kind of skin issue, or they are off their feed, etc. you just have to get the right person, and then there's TWO of you loving your horse.

best of luck, and do post photos when you get your new horse.

are you, by any chance, near Petaluma?
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post #4 of 11 Old 11-04-2016, 09:07 AM
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Good for you! I think adopting an older horse is a fabulous idea. When I first got into horses, I bothered people to learn constantly. BUT. I am a good worker and you can set your clock by my punctuality so even though I'm sure I was a nuicance at first, it paid off for those who got a free "employee"!

Does the boarding barn you are considering have any covered area such as arena or round pen? That will be helpful if you only can ride limited days. Unless you have fabulous weather year round!

Welcome to horsehood!

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post #5 of 11 Old 11-04-2016, 09:08 AM
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I love older horses! I agree that w/ plenty of turnout, the amount of time you want to ride would be fine. My only concern w/ an older horse is that some require maintenance of some sort and that can get expensive (hock injections, etc.). But, for light riding, that probability would be less.
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post #6 of 11 Old 11-04-2016, 09:33 AM
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I consider the age range you are looking for to be middle-aged and think it's a great age for a first horse.

I recommend a pre-purchase exam by a vet. You likely know one or can get a name of a good equine vet since you are in the industry.

As for learning to tack up a horse: how about asking one of the other boarders where you ride? Most good horsemen are willing to help a person who is new to horses.

The first horse I got for my daughters was 27. We had her for 4 years before she lost most of her teeth, began to fail terribly, and I put her down.

The above brings up my only caveat. If you get an older horse, know that the day will come when you are faced with their passing and have a plan. Of course, that is a must when we have any animal.
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post #7 of 11 Old 11-04-2016, 09:55 AM
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Nothing wrong with an older horse. I'm currently leasing a 24-year old OTTB. However, he doesn't act his age AT ALL. LOL. He's mr. need-for-speed! Never been lame either. Plenty of turnout is important though.

1) In the future (no time soon as im still learning) i would really like to adopt a senior horse, maybe around 17-20 years old from a rescue agency. My biggest problem is that i have a full time job as a vet tech, i work 5 days a week 11+ hours every day and the only days i have available to ride are wednesday and sunday. occasionally i get a saturday off. I do plan on boarding. I dont know if they include grooming at the ranch i go to, which may be a problem as well. as of right now, riding is a stress relieving hobby. Im taking lessons so i learn good riding and care, but eventually i want to do nothin more than to trail ride a few hours a few times a week, maybe get in some arena riding for 30 minutes every saturday if i can. Would it be a better idea to adopt an older horse who would benefit more from the lighter riding(side note, i only weigh 110 on a bad day, 5'8"), or should i get a younger horse around 10 who i could lease out to someone a few days of the week so they get more exercise? Of course this may change in the future, but my work is so physical and taxing as of right now i feel that i dont want to do much in the way of really intense disciplines.

I think adopting an older horse would be perfect for you. Especially if you are planning on some relaxing trail rides too, not super strenuous riding. I say go for it! :)

2) im in the bay area, how much do people around here pay on average for a barefoot trim?

I'm unsure, I live in MD!

3)My trainer has been working on my form and such, and its a small ranch so she does not have a lot of free time, but i really want to learn more aboput tacking up, grooming, stall cleaning, etc. I am too afraid to ask her because she is always so busy! how do i go about learning this stuff without being a bother to anyone? I am reallllly introverted and self conscious i have a hard time putting myself out there...

I'd ask a few people around the barn to help you. Don't be afraid, & you're not a burden either for asking. You won't know unless you ask. Horse people (for the MOST part) are very nice people & willing to help.
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post #8 of 11 Old 11-04-2016, 11:37 AM
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My only comment is that I love senior horses and am so happy to hear when someone wants to get one. FWIW, I have two friends competing in cow horses on horses in their 20's. The horses are sound, love their jobs and are a great inspiration to the rest of us. Good luck to you and if you get your pony, please post pix for us. I know I'd certainly LOVE to see them!
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post #9 of 11 Old 11-05-2016, 01:01 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the awesome replies everyone!
The barn I plan on boarding at has a few pastures that are well tended that have a few horses per area. They are right in he middle of Ed Levin park which has miles and miles of trail around it.
I would like to eventually adopt from red bucket rescue.
I am not very close to Petaluma, but it isn't terribly far.
I think I will text my trainer and ask if we can use 15 minutes of my lesson to go over grooming and tacking up that way I'm not taking more of her time up. I just need to buck up and do it. I have to learn some how. I shouldn't have a problem with any size horse right, I have long legs but I not weigh very much so I wouldn't be a heavy burden for any horse I choose :)
I did think about leasing before buying. But the place I go to for lessons only allows lease days on weekdays not weekend which would be the main time I have to ride, otherwise I would like to lease. I suppose I could go to another barn, but I'm comfortable at the place I'm at and I have a hard I'm adjusting to new things.
I tend to adopt underdogs :-D my cat is an adult black cat that they only gave 5 days to live and he is he best cat I've ever had. Second chances for everyone!
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post #10 of 11 Old 11-05-2016, 03:29 AM
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Hi. You might want to look into seeing if someone is offering a senior horse for lease that you can take to the ranch you like. It does happen. I know around here there are plenty of people willing to lease a horse and have them boarded off property and won't charge for the horse itself, so you just pay for the board and care. It might be something to think about before you actually purchase a horse.


I think it is great you want to adopt from a rescue, but be careful. You might want to take your trainer with you or at least talk to her about it before you jump right in.


I rescued my horse when she was 18years old. She is the best horse ever. She is 23 now.
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