ADVICE needed or your VIEWS, - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 09:02 AM Thread Starter
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ADVICE needed or your VIEWS,

i just finished building a stable in my back garden , its 19 ft X 19 ft sq and 10 ft high ,
yesterday i got delivered a 4 and a half month old foal a colt ,
he is untouched never been handled until yesterday ,

ppl are telling me to tie him against the wall for 3 hr a day ect ect
but im thinking leave him walking around the stable for a wk or 2 wks,

cause IMO the foal in ,,REALITY,, has been like ,,kidnapped ,, and he has never been away from his mother or never been in a stable , and he is terrified,
thanks folks for reading ,
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post #2 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 09:43 AM
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First this foal NEEDS another horse as a companion. ASAP.

Second, tying a young foal, that has never been trained to be tied, for hours on end, is a really good way to create really big issues (broken neck?) I'm also not sure what that would accomplish at this point.

Do NOT tie him. Let him loose. Your gut is right.

Get a chair, sit down in there and hang out with him.

Do keep in mind that while this is a suitable enclosure, at the moment, it will not be long term, he will need lots of room to run around and play outside with his friend.

Don't worry about him being "kidnapped" you can't put your emotions on him.

What you can and should do is recognize that he is scared and do what you can to fix that. Get him a friend. Get him everything he needs (food water, make sure the food is age appropriate). Then you sit down and calmly get him used to your presence and you will help him get over being scared. If there's nothing he needs and he learns that you provide what he needs and are kind to him he will get over his fear and learn to trust you and look forward to seeing you.

Don't baby him. Rules apply, but be calm and quiet. Once you have some trust you can start working on training. Touching him all over, picking up feet, putting a halter on, teaching to lead. When he's ready you can work on tying, and remember he must be trained to tie. Tying can be a very useful tool but not one that is needed or appropriate at the moment.
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post #3 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 10:10 AM
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Three years ago I got a four month old filly for my daughter to train. Like your horse, my filly had never had anyone touch her. She was wild and scared when she arrived at my place. I put her in a pasture with an older mare who immediately bonded with her and got her over being weaned from her mother.

Then I built two pens inside the pasture about 20 ft. by 30 ft. each, and put her food and her buddy mare's food in those pens. I fed the horses twice a day in the pens, letting them out when they had finished eating. After the filly was used to eating in the pen, as Yogiwick suggested, my daughter spent a lot of time just being in the pen with the filly. It wasn't long before we put a halter on her . . . and took it off. Soon the filly had no problem with the halter going on and off her head. My daughter spent a lot of time grooming the filly in her pen. Then we began teaching her tricks, taking her for walks, letting her eat in the trailer, taking her out to graze, although she had all the grass she wanted with her buddy in her pasture, she got used to being away from her buddy and the other horses.

Then we taught her to stand tied, to move away from pressure, to let her feet be handled, back up, and learn general horse handling. She learned to be driven in long lines, had a bareback pad cinched up on her back, and later, learned to stand quietly in crossties.

When she was about 2, we began trailering her with different horses to interesting places like barrel racing and trail rides. She learned to be led with someone riding another horse.

When she turned 3, my daughter began to sit on her, both bareback and with a saddle. As she got used to that, I began to lead her with my daughter sitting on her, and as she got used to that, I began to lead her riding another horse.

Now she is 3 1/2 and is doing great. I rode her along the roadside this morning with traffic whizzing past her. You just have to take everything step by step. Don't ask the horse to make any big changes or assume the horse will know something like "walk forward when its sides are squeezed". Everything has to be taught, firmly but fairly. My daughter now has a terrific filly and the pride of knowing that she raised and trained her herself.
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post #4 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
First this foal NEEDS another horse as a companion. ASAP.

Second, tying a young foal, that has never been trained to be tied, for hours on end, is a really good way to create really big issues (broken neck?) I'm also not sure what that would accomplish at this point.

Do NOT tie him. Let him loose. Your gut is right.

Get a chair, sit down in there and hang out with him.

Do keep in mind that while this is a suitable enclosure, at the moment, it will not be long term, he will need lots of room to run around and play outside with his friend.

Don't worry about him being "kidnapped" you can't put your emotions on him.

What you can and should do is recognize that he is scared and do what you can to fix that. Get him a friend. Get him everything he needs (food water, make sure the food is age appropriate). Then you sit down and calmly get him used to your presence and you will help him get over being scared. If there's nothing he needs and he learns that you provide what he needs and are kind to him he will get over his fear and learn to trust you and look forward to seeing you.

Don't baby him. Rules apply, but be calm and quiet. Once you have some trust you can start working on training. Touching him all over, picking up feet, putting a halter on, teaching to lead. When he's ready you can work on tying, and remember he must be trained to tie. Tying can be a very useful tool but not one that is needed or appropriate at the moment.
Exactly what Yogiwick said, every bit of it is great advice. By all means, do NOT try to tie that foal up, as you most likely end up with a dead foal. HaVing never been handled, it does not know how to give to the pressure of being tied, and will fight it. If you can't get another horse for companionship, get a goat.
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post #5 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 10:30 AM
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Op does have another horse, a yearling, or possibly 2 year old 12hh cob that her son has been riding....son is 16 by memory....
Horseychick87, Whinnie and BUTCH like this.

“Never attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidity”
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post #6 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 10:36 AM
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Edited...

Last edited by Persephone2015; 11-21-2015 at 10:39 AM. Reason: computer being weird...will try my post later
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post #7 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 11:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knightrider View Post
Three years ago I got a four month old filly for my daughter to train. Like your horse, my filly had never had anyone touch her. She was wild and scared when she arrived at my place. I put her in a pasture with an older mare who immediately bonded with her and got her over being weaned from her mother.

Then I built two pens inside the pasture about 20 ft. by 30 ft. each, and put her food and her buddy mare's food in those pens. I fed the horses twice a day in the pens, letting them out when they had finished eating. After the filly was used to eating in the pen, as Yogiwick suggested, my daughter spent a lot of time just being in the pen with the filly. It wasn't long before we put a halter on her . . . and took it off. Soon the filly had no problem with the halter going on and off her head. My daughter spent a lot of time grooming the filly in her pen. Then we began teaching her tricks, taking her for walks, letting her eat in the trailer, taking her out to graze, although she had all the grass she wanted with her buddy in her pasture, she got used to being away from her buddy and the other horses.

Then we taught her to stand tied, to move away from pressure, to let her feet be handled, back up, and learn general horse handling. She learned to be driven in long lines, had a bareback pad cinched up on her back, and later, learned to stand quietly in crossties.

When she was about 2, we began trailering her with different horses to interesting places like barrel racing and trail rides. She learned to be led with someone riding another horse.

When she turned 3, my daughter began to sit on her, both bareback and with a saddle. As she got used to that, I began to lead her with my daughter sitting on her, and as she got used to that, I began to lead her riding another horse.

Now she is 3 1/2 and is doing great. I rode her along the roadside this morning with traffic whizzing past her. You just have to take everything step by step. Don't ask the horse to make any big changes or assume the horse will know something like "walk forward when its sides are squeezed". Everything has to be taught, firmly but fairly. My daughter now has a terrific filly and the pride of knowing that she raised and trained her herself.
Excellent step by step advice.
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post #8 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 06:45 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse View Post
Op does have another horse, a yearling, or possibly 2 year old 12hh cob that her son has been riding....son is 16 by memory....
i thought that myself ?
should i bring him in ?
he is just 2 yrs old and uncut but a cob and so very placid ? should i bring him in for a few days to stay with him ?
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post #9 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BUTCH View Post
i thought that myself ?
should i bring him in ?
he is just 2 yrs old and uncut but a cob and so very placid ? should i bring him in for a few days to stay with him ?
Yes you should bring him in and see how it goes.
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post #10 of 16 Old 11-21-2015, 07:42 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whinnie View Post
Yes you should bring him in and see how it goes.
i will in the next day or so ,,
but i will keep a close eye on them ,
the cob his name is ,, HORSE ,, and he is so placid with u and me ?
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