Biting after girthing - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 01:57 PM
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Here is a girth similar to the ones Foxhunter mentioned by Total Saddle Fit. $150.00 USD for the English girth.

https://totalsaddlefit.com/

I have a weird way to girth up but it works for me. It is a combination of what others have advised. I only girth to the least hole that will keep the saddle from falling off. I don't bridle, but walk her around haltered and girth a hole at a time until I am done (it is easier for me to correct her if necessary, when she is haltered). Then I bridle. I also use a girth with elastic at both ends. I am never in a hurry when I am out to ride so it matters not to me that this takes extra time.
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post #42 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 02:12 PM
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I think Harley already has a sheepskin girth? It looks rather like the one's I use and if so its elasticated too
I only initially tighten the girth enough to keep the saddle in place, tighten again when I've led the horse to wherever I'm going to get on and then tighten again after I've been riding for about half an hour. If I've got a horse that's a bit 'cold backed' girthy - the sort that bronc or bunny hop when they feel it tighten around them I walk them around several times in hand and tighten a bit at a time before getting on
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post #43 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 02:38 PM
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I've read that Pepto Bismal helps. Not sure of quantity and how often as in 1,2,3 x daily but you should be able to find info on that. If he has intestinal ulcers, switch his grain/pellets to straight oats. So far, oats are the only thing that will heal them. They don't have to be crushed or rolled. How often are you deworming him. Wormers are hard on the stomach. Older horses (older than 10) are usually good with 2x annually, Spring and late Fall.



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post #44 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 03:17 PM
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I have tried Pepto Bismol but my Arab did NOT like that stuff.

It has always ended up that I go to the vet's for Omeprazole.

I've got to where I don't even try OTC stuff if I strongly suspect gastric ulcers, I just anty up the money for a bottle of omeprazole and keep the horse on it until the bottle is completely empty.

Except for my horse that had hind gut ulcers (a completely different evil critter than gastric stomach ulcers), the Omeprazole has always worked.

Acadian, your vet may have asked for a stool sample to check for hind gut ulcers - blood in the stool sample can be an indicator of them:(

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #45 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 04:39 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
The only (possible) sign of ulcers that will show up in a fecal sample is blood if they're bad enough to cause internal bleeding
The sort of encysted worms that cause enough pain to make a horse girthy also rarely show up in a fecal sample
A full blood test might have been more useful as the encysted worms and ulcers can both cause anemia
Hope you can sort something out
I understand that Jaydee, which is why he's getting wormed with Moxidectin and will be treated for ulcers. The only question is whether it's a severe infestation that would show up in a stool or not. Basically, the vet says scoping is no more revealing of ulcers if they're not in the stomach so the stool sample is a much less invasive way to see if we can pin something down. But even if absolutely nothing shows up, he is still getting treated.

You might wonder why I'd bother doing it at all... like I said, I don't like not knowing and I don't like randomly treating for things. If there a slight possibility that this will give us answers, then it's not outrageously expensive to do and it's completely harmless to Harley. If I don't get any answers from this, then we'll still worm and treat for ulcers, though less aggressively.

On another note, as I was waiting around for him to grace me with a stool sample, I noticed that when it finally did come, it was very liquid again. Like pure liquid at first - a brownish red. So there could be some blood. After the liquid was a very wet stool, like cow patties, then finally a few balls. Sorry for the description, but this has me worried. If we don't find anything to explain this in the stool sample, I will talk to the vet again. Blood work may very well be coming next.
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post #46 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 04:41 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
I think Harley already has a sheepskin girth? It looks rather like the one's I use and if so its elasticated too
I only initially tighten the girth enough to keep the saddle in place, tighten again when I've led the horse to wherever I'm going to get on and then tighten again after I've been riding for about half an hour. If I've got a horse that's a bit 'cold backed' girthy - the sort that bronc or bunny hop when they feel it tighten around them I walk them around several times in hand and tighten a bit at a time before getting on
Yes, he does and I tighten it as gradually as I can, but it only seems to make it worse... like we're drawing out the process. Because once we get on him and start riding, he's fine.
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post #47 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 04:42 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag View Post
I've read that Pepto Bismal helps. Not sure of quantity and how often as in 1,2,3 x daily but you should be able to find info on that. If he has intestinal ulcers, switch his grain/pellets to straight oats. So far, oats are the only thing that will heal them. They don't have to be crushed or rolled. How often are you deworming him. Wormers are hard on the stomach. Older horses (older than 10) are usually good with 2x annually, Spring and late Fall.
He has been wormed in November. Was planning on doing a spring/fall worming, but I do know that the previous owners were worming systematically every 2 months.
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post #48 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 04:44 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
I have tried Pepto Bismol but my Arab did NOT like that stuff.

It has always ended up that I go to the vet's for Omeprazole.

I've got to where I don't even try OTC stuff if I strongly suspect gastric ulcers, I just anty up the money for a bottle of omeprazole and keep the horse on it until the bottle is completely empty.

Except for my horse that had hind gut ulcers (a completely different evil critter than gastric stomach ulcers), the Omeprazole has always worked.

Acadian, your vet may have asked for a stool sample to check for hind gut ulcers - blood in the stool sample can be an indicator of them:(

I'm guessing you're right. The plan is to treat him with Omeprazole. The only thing that will change once we get the results of the stool analysis is whether we treat for severe (if there are signs) or mild ulcers (if there are none).
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post #49 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 04:53 PM
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Can't you buy omeprazole over the counter? I buy it for myself from Amazon.com and I don't see why you would need a vet to get it for your horse.
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post #50 of 72 Old 02-26-2016, 04:53 PM Thread Starter
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Also, I found a horse nutrionist!!! She trained at Guelph and is going to meet with me to see if we can figure out Harley's dietary needs and the best possible diet for him. So far I have tried him on three feeds and a few supplements which may very well have caused the ulcers. Although he was girthy when we got him (worse now though) so he may have had them a long time.

I'm hoping we can properly analyze his diet and get him feeling better so he can be the sweet horse he is. Today, when I went to get the stool sample, I put him in the indoor arena and just let him wander around without a halter. After munching on some hay (there is a feeder in the indoor because the BO uses it as a shelter in bad weather), he walked over to me so I decided to walk him around the arena at liberty, as if he was on a lead rope. I started by just touching his neck and then just walking beside him. He was very tuned into me and chose to walk, then trot besides me (I didn't even give the trot command, I just started jogging and he did the same). He is really such a wonderful horse when he's not girthy.
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