Biting and sticky feet - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 36 Old 01-26-2016, 03:06 PM
Green Broke
 
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OP. Horse has your number, I agree with the others that you need someone working with you ASAP.

It may also be along with your inexperience, that you are aggravating as can be, voice too high pitched, you fidget too much, or are too jerky in your movements and horse is letting you know that.

All you are accomplishing with your slapping horse is nothing. And eventually horse will decide to up the game and really come after you because you are not in charge. At best you will end up with a horse that is shy of something around its head.

Horses make me a better person.
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post #12 of 36 Old 01-26-2016, 03:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
I also agree you are mismatched.

When you slap her on the neck it means absolutely nothing to her. When she turns to bite you whilst leading you need to be quick with your hand and meet the side of her muzzle with a good open handed slap or carry something sharp like a large nail and ***** her with that when she tries it on.

Much the same when she tries to bite your leg, do not move your leg away but use your toe to give her a good kick on the muzzle.

You really need a trainer.

Carrying a horseshoe nail with just tip showing between the fingers of a clenched fist that is holding the halter rope is how I do it, never a large one. And in this case, I doubt that the OP is going to be able to do this to where horse is corrected. Rather it will result in a wound.

The whole purpose of the hidden horseshoe nail is to let horse think it has corrected itself, and even then, if use a large nail, and this is happening while leading means more confusion in hand placement for OP, just don't think it will go well.

Also having trouble visualizing exactly where slap is coming from, OP should be on near side leading off of her right side, so horse bites at her, is she stopping and then facing horse to slap with right hand, reaching across with left hand to slap or???

Either way, waste of time.

For this, and mind you I rarely have had to deal with this, was taught better from the beginning, but you get horses that have been spoiled or ruined due to mishandling, my method of leading one does away with a lot of problems.

I lead with my shoulder at throatlatch, left hand holding coils of lead rope, right hand about a foot from underside ring on halter, where lead rope is snapped on, I either have my forefinger resting along the rope with nail toward horses muzzle, or will turn my hand so thumbnail is, and if horse comes in, I shift my hand to let it bump into my fingernail.

I never acknowledge that has happened, no talking, nor even looking at horse, it has corrected itself and thinks it had better not do that again.

If the bump into fingernail doesn't get message across, I will turn hand and give a quick jab with thumbnail into soft side of muzzle just above lips, again no talking to or looking at. Correction is made and understood. And problem is stopped.

As for the turning to bite while up? Why on earth is your rein loose enough horse can get head that far around to begin with?

Get a trainer OP.

Horses make me a better person.
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post #13 of 36 Old 01-26-2016, 03:53 PM
Started
 
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thank you palomine. i guess gottatrot and i both have it wrong then? the horses ive worked with just never figured out they could pull back and get away with it i guess.
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post #14 of 36 Old 01-26-2016, 04:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalisaParalyzer View Post
thank you palomine. i guess gottatrot and i both have it wrong then? the horses ive worked with just never figured out they could pull back and get away with it i guess.
Well if worked it was right in that situation, as so often in the horse world, more than one way to get a result!

I much prefer to carry a fencing staple so they poke themselves with that, once a horse figures that humans seem to be protected by hidden *****les they decide themselves to quit. Kind of like keep telling a youngster not to touch the hot stove, it's only when they succeed in touching it that the lesson about 'hot' gets through and they quit trying!
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post #15 of 36 Old 01-26-2016, 07:21 PM
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I really cringed reading the original post! It sounds to me that this filly is NOT broke to ride and was not properly trained with the preliminary ground work either. I can't tell if the biting on the ground is true aggression or the playful nipping that young horses will do, but either way it needs to be corrected. As for biting the rider's foot when kicked . . .I don't blame her at all if she has no idea of what leg pressure means. No offense meant to the OP but rather than try to correct these issues yourself, my advice is to sell the filly to someone more experienced and replace her with a horse that you can learn on. The other alternative is to work with a good trainer. In my opinion this horse needs to be started over again however, and will require more than a couple of sessions with a trainer.
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post #16 of 36 Old 01-26-2016, 07:42 PM
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When the OP halters the horse she needs to fold her arm and flap her elbow a few times, then when leading the horse, do this at random times when leading. If the horse connects with a sharp elbow it will think twice about repeating. I've done this as well to horses that walk crooked, head leaning inward. One sharp bump is usually all it takes. I think you should consider professional help or at least someone with a fair amount of horse skills to help you with her.



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post #17 of 36 Old 01-26-2016, 08:27 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for your advice.
We are getting a trainer soon, but I want to go over the basics with her first. She is getting better at not biting and is doing well with riding.

Again, thank you for the advice
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post #18 of 36 Old 01-26-2016, 08:41 PM
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Please don't think I am being mean or rude, but it is clear you don't even have enough knowledge yourself to teach a horse anything. Not even the basics. You posted because your horse doesn't understand leg pressure and bites you all the time (or at least tries to). That doesn't sound to me like she's "getting better about biting" and "doing well with riding" and to have undergone such a drastic about face in 24 hours ... well, that would truly be a miracle.

This horse is likely confused and has no idea what you want. There's no shame in it. We have all been there. None of us were born with the knowledge of how to train a horse. The difference is, those of us who are trying to help you have "done our time in the trenches" so to speak. We've owned horses for years and spent countless hours reading, watching and taking lessons from everywhere.

You are in over your head. Don't get a trainer soon. Get a trainer now. Watch training videos from well respected trainers ... Buck Brannaman ... Jonathan Fields ... take your pick. Your horse is spoiled and you don't have the knowledge to offer her clear signals and proper repercussions. I would go out on a limb to say that 90% of training a horse depends solely on the trainer's sense of timing ... if you're timing is off or you deliver an inappropriate reprimand, the horse will most certainly become resentful and disrespectful.

I say this in the best interests of both you and your horse, but you are setting your horse up for major failure by attempting to train on your own. By all means, find a trainer and work with them and be out with them and watch them at every opportunity, but you need to stop trying to go this alone.

Training a young horse is about so much more than jumping on their back and hoping they don't explode ... I'm truly afraid for your safety. This is a wreck waiting to happen.
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post #19 of 36 Old 01-26-2016, 08:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Siren View Post
That doesn't sound to me like she's "getting better about biting" and "doing well with riding" and to have undergone such a drastic about face in 24 hours ... well, that would truly be a miracle.
And the world needs more miracles

Sadly I do not believe that one has happened here, not in 24 hours
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post #20 of 36 Old 01-29-2016, 12:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julesthehorsegirl View Post
Thank you all for your advice.
We are getting a trainer soon, but I want to go over the basics with her first. She is getting better at not biting and is doing well with riding.

Again, thank you for the advice

Hi Jules,
None of us here want to be mean and rude to you at all but we are mostly experienced horse people who have witnessed and been through years of watching horses hurt people (and themselves) because they got a bad start in life. Your horse is on the way to this fate as 3 years old is very, very young and now is when she is learning the extremely important "basics" that will determine what kind of life she will have later. We fear for you and your horse both.

I am sorry to be blunt but from your post it's obvious that you need more experience to even teach a horse the "basics". The lessons, good or bad, that she is learning now will stay with her for life and those whose early training is done badly usually end up in the slaughter pen through no fault of their own. Thousands of them go through the auction not far from me, literally thrown away.

I truly hope you are getting a good trainer and immediately, although the better and cheaper option would be to sell this filly and get an older, safe trained horse that will help teach you how a horse should behave. The way things are now, this trainer will have to train both of you and it may be years before you have a fun horse that you can trust.

Please consider letting go of this filly and getting a mature, well trained, fully grown horse. You'll have a lot more fun and a lot less frustration.
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