Bot flies while riding - and a ticklish mare... - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 18 Old 10-05-2017, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Folly View Post
Wellll yuk

No wonder she is freaked out by them. I couldn't understand, since I know from swatting them that although they look like honey bees, they are very soft (more like a moth's body) and don't bite or sting.

The only thing that seems to get rid of them is a hard freeze. Thank goodness the season is only fall... but sadly, that's when we have some of the most gorgeous riding weather. It's always something....

- On another note, some of the above suggestions were to put sheets or wraps on her while riding... that actually scares me a little, since it's the hovering of the flies that drives her crazy (anticipation), and they never actually touch her or land on her. I'm afraid she'd thrash just seeing them, and get hung up in whatever I had on her for protection. And, I never could find a belly sheet for use while riding. I think psychologically, she'd be just as worried about them whether or not they could actually get to her. I don't want to cause a wreck. That tail hair swatter thing sounds quirky, but interesting!
Agreed, the sheets won't work when you're riding.

I used to wear a if a e mask with ears on the horse to keep the the flies off their faces ANNNNNNND also the Orb spider webs, lollol

I also used to simply break a leafy switch off a tree and use it to keep the flies away. If you break one about 1/2" in diameter, full of leaves and about 2-1/2 feet long, you can reach the nose and between the legs. It doesn't take long for the horse to realize you are trying to help it but, with anxious horses your aim better be spot on and quick, lollol
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A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #12 of 18 Old 10-05-2017, 03:11 PM
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Some 40 + years ago organophosphates were used on cattle to eradicate the bot fly. This was the fly that laid eggs which developed in the stomachs amd then migrated up through the body to break out somewhere in the hide along the cattle's back. This ruined the hides. It certainly got rid of those bots. After that the only time I ever came across them was in a couple of steers that came over from Eire.

With horses in the U.K. The bots still,around lay eggs on the legs or withers, these are licked off and again develop in the stomach. What I noticed was that when the farmer adjoining our land wormed all his cattle spring and summer, it was unusual to get any of these bot flies.
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post #13 of 18 Old 10-06-2017, 11:06 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
Some 40 + years ago organophosphates were used on cattle to eradicate the bot fly. This was the fly that laid eggs which developed in the stomachs amd then migrated up through the body to break out somewhere in the hide along the cattle's back. This ruined the hides. It certainly got rid of those bots. After that the only time I ever came across them was in a couple of steers that came over from Eire.

With horses in the U.K. The bots still,around lay eggs on the legs or withers, these are licked off and again develop in the stomach. What I noticed was that when the farmer adjoining our land wormed all his cattle spring and summer, it was unusual to get any of these bot flies.
We are surrounded by cattle... and I am quite sure they rarely if ever get wormed. That probably doesn't help matters.

I'm a mid-lifer finally making time for horses... Having a blast, but there's soooo much to learn -
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post #14 of 18 Old 10-06-2017, 11:16 AM
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Same here. Our cattle get wormed regularly, same as the horses: After every first freeze and again in the spring.

But I can't vouch for the cattle on the place south of us or north and west of us. That land is leased out and so far as I can tell, no one is coming out, ever, to round the cattle up and work them. There's no lots for that on either place, and no one is hauling the 30 or so cow calf pairs off in a bull wagon and returning them later, so I'd say: No. They aren't getting wormed properly.

Thanks guys...

I've about given up trying to keep them off our horses. We'll just have a big worming party after we get our first frost. Nasty suckers. I think of all the nuisance critters that come hand-in-hand with horses, bots are the WORST on so many levels.
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post #15 of 18 Old 10-06-2017, 11:56 AM Thread Starter
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Does the wormer kill the ones that get into the mouths and burrow there? that sounds so awful for the poor animals :(

I'm a mid-lifer finally making time for horses... Having a blast, but there's soooo much to learn -
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post #16 of 18 Old 10-06-2017, 12:14 PM
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I'm not entirely sure and that's a good question to ask our new vet. It seems so, because that's why a second worming is recommended, to get any 2nd and 3d stage larvae, if I'm reading this correctly. No matter how you slice it, they're nasty foul creatures and if they suddenly all became extinct, I don't think anyone would weep.

Management (Back to Top)

Mechanical control.
Feces should be cleaned and transported away since this is the area where the final development occurs before the fly emerges. Bot eggs can be removed from the horse's body by several methods. A tool with a sharp edge or a form of sand paper can be used to scrape away the bot eggs. Warm water with appropriate insecticide can be used to induce the eggs to hatch and kill the larvae. The first stage larvae die soon after hatching if they do not reach the mouth. Protection, such as rubber gloves, help in preventing larvae from entering the handler.

Chemical control. An insecticide can also be applied weekly during the peak egg laying season to the areas of the body covered with bot eggs. Oral medications can be used to reduce the numbers of larvae inside of the stomach. Commonly used medications include avermectins, which come in different formulations: liquids, gels, boluses, and feed additives. Avermectins work to control the adult and larval fly stages (Peter et al. 2005). The horse should be treated within one month after eggs are seen during the early summer months. A second treatment should be administered in the Fall to control the second and third stage larvae.
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post #17 of 18 Old 10-06-2017, 12:25 PM
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and this from another site:

G. intestinalis G. nasalis

G. intestinalis lays up to 1,000 pale-yellow eggs on the horse's forelegs and shoulders. Moisture and friction from the horse's licking itself cause the eggs to hatch in about seven days. After hatching, G. intestinalis larvae are licked into the mouth.

G. nasalis lays about 500 yellow eggs around the chin and throat of the horse. These eggs are not dependent on the horse's licking them to hatch. G. nasalis burrows under the skin to the mouth, wandering through it for about a month before migrating to the stomach for overwintering. Then the cycle begins again.

Signs of Bot Infestation

Horses that show no outward signs of illness can be severely infested, giving no clue to damage occurring inside. However, some horses do show signs of infestation, including an inflamed mouth area and stomach irritation. Infestation with bot larvae may cause ulcers in the stomach lining. If the infestation is severe, the opening from the stomach to the intestines may be blocked, which can cause irritation, ulcers and even colic. The burrowing larvae can cause small tears in the skin, which can become infected.

Treatment for Bots

Traditionally, horses are treated for bots in the fall, after a frost that kills the adult flies, and again in the spring, to rid the stomach of all the larvae. In the past, the treatment was worse than the disease, with extremely toxic chemicals given via stomach tube to the horse. Modern anthelmintics like ivermectin are extremely effective and safe in the treatment of bots and have had an impact on lowering the number of bot flies in areas where good anthelmintic treatment is practiced.


____________________

I'm wondering if a product like the tri tec would kill the larvae before they get to the horse's mouth and nose... even if it doesn't get the adult fly, I'd be happy knowing the larvae are dying in vast numbers before they ever get beyond my horses' legs.
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post #18 of 18 Old 10-06-2017, 03:41 PM
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I hope this posts before I lose it ------ I am having a dickens of a hard time just getting onto any of the forums I belong to:( :(

1. Regarding the throat bots --- I think I already said I took the clippers to the horses jaw line so I can see the eggs easier. I can't get them off with anything, so I smother them with any kind of ointment ---- Vaseline, A&D ointment, antibiotic ointment --- whatever my hand lands on first.

2. Nasal bots --- I knew about them but forgot about them <sigh> I need to check but I do wash their inside noses every morning before turnout with Vertericyn ---- I doubt that does mich for bots but it sure gets the allergy boogers out:)

3. Cattle --- I am surrounded by cattle. The biggest beef farmer does take excellent care of his cattle, I like to think he is diligent about worming. The other two farmers ----- nice and honest as they can be but I doubt they spend the money on work meds.

4. I saved the best for last, lollol. I so regret not taking a picture but I was horrified and didn't think about pictures until it was too late.

Somewhere on this thread I mentioned a throat bot fly hovering around Rusty when I was washing his legs and face the other day (we also have Dallis Grass and the sap is running off the pods:(:(.

Well yesterday that bot fly was drowned in one of Joker's water tubs ------- it's a good thing I inspect the outdoor tubs before I turn the horses out in the morning.

Not only was that bot fly "dead in the water" literally, its death evidently caused it to release all of its eggs ------- if there weren't several hundred of them laying on the bottom of the water tub there wasn't one ---- not to mention a few on the edge of the tub where the fly must have struggled to get out of the water and couldn't.

How is that for throwing up fodder, lollol

Yes I scrubbed the tub and set it in the sun to bake while I remodeled that particular water and salt block area, lol

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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