Bridling difficulties - Page 12 - The Horse Forum
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post #111 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 11:23 AM
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Take a video of what you're doing and post it here.
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post #112 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 11:25 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Whinnie View Post
I am also wondering why your horse continues to invade your space and disrespect you when you have corrected her every time. If she is incredibly sensitive to pressure and gets uncomfortable, it doesn't make sense she persists in pushing you around.
Im as puzzled as much as you are on this. The only reason why I think she still does this (few actually) is 1) her age, like the previous owner said, she will test you all the time, and shes not fully mature. Previous owner says that she constantly needs reminders because she will check in with you to see if the rules still apply.


And 2) Im still not hard enough on her. Though Im a thousand times harder on her right now than I was when I got her, the punishment is obviously not severe enough.

This is why I have taken my assertiveness to another level. The next time she tries to bite me I will whack her literally as hard as I can on the muzzle.

For now on when Im around her, Im going to constantly watch and anticipate when shes going to rub on me. Cause if I can read it a half second sooner than when she actually does it, I will give her a swift elbow to the muzzle because catching her by surprise will startle her every single time much more than the actual impact of the elbow.

Like I said, one of the boarders at my old barn had a good talk with me a good 2.5 months ago on how I need to step up and become more assertive. When she tries to rub on me or bite me, I need to punch her in the muzzle. This is what he does to his two geldings (and they test him all the time), he will make a fist and literally punch them in the muzzle as hard as he can.
I might have to resort to this as my next option but I feel if I can whack her noticably harder with my open palm on her muzzle, that possibly send the message and get her to quit within 2-3 scenarios.

Theres no way around it, I simply just need to be harder on her.
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post #113 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
Cause right now, I just cant do the whole bridling process with her, its too much to ask for from her. Thats why I feel I need to break it down and get her to stand quiet with just even having the bit within her sight.

It is not too much for her. It may, perhaps, be too much for you. But please stop using your horse's age as an excuse for anything. She is old enough and mature enough to handle anything you might ask of her.
I'm sorry, but it's crap that a 4 year old horse is 'too young' to stand tied for extended periods of time or have a bridle put on her or any of this. If she can't handle this stuff, how can you expect her to handle carrying a rider around?

The snaffle bit futurity is going on right now -- That's 300-400 THREE year old horses in Reno, showing at a very high level of competition, cutting, reining, and fence work (very fast, demanding cow work). Now many people may argue that their bodies aren't mature enough to take the demands of such high level performance, but their minds can certainly handle it. You wouldn't bring a horse to such a big event, if they couldn't handle mentally... you'd never be able to get it shown and it would be a waste of thousands of dollars in entry fees and travel costs.


Your horse IS old enough and mature enough to handle everything you've tried to do with her. You have not yet asked her to do anything difficult. The things you are trying to get her to do are things that a 2 year old, just started colt, can handle. Her training may be subpar, I'm not really convinced that she's even really broke, but that's a result of people dropping the ball with her, not the horse's mental capacitiy.
As long as you go around thinking that she can't handle stuff, she won't. And you'll never make her.


If you want a broke horse, you've got to treat her like a broke horse.


The other part of the problem is you don't stick with any method long enough for it to work. One day you were talking about holding the bridle over her poll, as many of us suggested, now you're back to holding it under her chin. You need to pick a method and stick with it long enough to see results, instead of changing your mind constantly, confusing yourself and your horse.
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post #114 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 01:29 PM Thread Starter
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It is not too much for her. It may, perhaps, be too much for you. But please stop using your horse's age as an excuse for anything. She is old enough and mature enough to handle anything you might ask of her.
I'm sorry, but it's crap that a 4 year old horse is 'too young' to stand tied for extended periods of time or have a bridle put on her or any of this. If she can't handle this stuff, how can you expect her to handle carrying a rider around?

The snaffle bit futurity is going on right now -- That's 300-400 THREE year old horses in Reno, showing at a very high level of competition, cutting, reining, and fence work (very fast, demanding cow work). Now many people may argue that their bodies aren't mature enough to take the demands of such high level performance, but their minds can certainly handle it. You wouldn't bring a horse to such a big event, if they couldn't handle mentally... you'd never be able to get it shown and it would be a waste of thousands of dollars in entry fees and travel costs.


Your horse IS old enough and mature enough to handle everything you've tried to do with her. You have not yet asked her to do anything difficult. The things you are trying to get her to do are things that a 2 year old, just started colt, can handle. Her training may be subpar, I'm not really convinced that she's even really broke, but that's a result of people dropping the ball with her, not the horse's mental capacitiy.
As long as you go around thinking that she can't handle stuff, she won't. And you'll never make her.


If you want a broke horse, you've got to treat her like a broke horse.


The other part of the problem is you don't stick with any method long enough for it to work. One day you were talking about holding the bridle over her poll, as many of us suggested, now you're back to holding it under her chin. You need to pick a method and stick with it long enough to see results, instead of changing your mind constantly, confusing yourself and your horse.
Who suggested holding the bridle over her poll? I havent done that and didnt know it was suggested until you brought it up just now.

I said Ive been working with her on getting her to lower her head by 1) putting down pressure on the lead and 2) pressure on her poll.

And I am still working on this. Should I be holding the bridle above her head and under her chin?

Last edited by Hoofpic; 10-01-2015 at 01:37 PM.
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post #115 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 01:39 PM
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Until YOU know how to do this, how do you expect your horse to learn it?

Why green plus green equals black and blue.

She KNOWS you don't know, are unsure, not assertive enough....I said assertive, not aggressive....you ARE going to wind up with a MESS if you start whacking on her for something that NeiTHER of you actually understand......

Please take lessons.....

I said that...that is how I bridle a horse. Hold the bridle in my right hand, with my wrist or forearm on the poll, between the ears. Hold the bit with my right hand. Pull bridle up with right hand, stick thumb in, push lower jaw down, slide bit in, put bridle over ears.
Only been doing it that way for 50 years....
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post #116 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 01:42 PM Thread Starter
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Until YOU know how to do this, how do you expect your horse to learn it?

Why green plus green equals black and blue.

She KNOWS you don't know, are unsure, not assertive enough....I said assertive, not aggressive....you ARE going to wind up with a MESS if you start whacking on her for something that NeiTHER of you actually understand......

Please take lessons.....
Can you stop? When did I whack her? I never have when bridling her. And for the record I am taking lessons, my next one is Sat.

Your technique sounds good too, very similar to what im doing right now (as instructed by my trainer).
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post #117 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 01:44 PM
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Watch this video, it shows a difficult horse to bridle, listen to what is said and how in two weeks he had been working on anxiety issues whilst working the horse. He hadn't actually ridden it at this point.




There are some things that are not making sense. You say you have your right hand on her cheek, if that is so how are you holding the bridle? You hand should be under her jaw and over her nose about half way between the eyes and nostril or, from the left the right hand between her ears holding the bridle leaving the left hand free to open the mouth and lace the bit inside.

Yes, horses will test the boundaries.
The horse that keeps testing those boundaries on a regular basis, has not been taught where those boundaries lie.

The horse knows that you are a novice and is probably taking the proverbial Mickey, cannot blame her for that.

Using her age as a reason for bad behaviour is just an excuse.

The reason this is all happening is because of your inexperience. The best thing you could do is to leave her alone, go get some good lessons it's an older horse on handling it.
Learn the 'feel' so you can read what the horse is thinking and stop something before it happens.

Unless all the ground problems are sorted then she is not going to respect you when it comes to riding her.

Just as a matter of interest how many hours have you spent in the saddle?
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post #118 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 01:52 PM
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Yes, I know what you're saying. Every horse is an individual. One has to be a virtual detective at times to sort out what an issue is. Sometimes it's as simple as it has the owners number , and other times it's a subtle medical issue.
Yep I agree. :) I know fighting to deworm is not on my list of favs, so we figured out a work-around of sorts with out bowl of grain. For the 2x per year we need to do it, I feel like it is a great compromise. And I think as I get more comfy with fingers near mouths, I think she will probably do better with me putting them there and allowing it. I think she senses my worry and wonders why we are doing it.

And yes to owner's numbers/taking advantage as well. :) Horses are insanely smart!
I have been laid up the past near 2 weeks and my parents, hubby and daughter had to feed them. They all act as if the horses are untrained bc they are grabbing from the wagon, getting in the way, etc.
This morning I fed. All 3 immediately went on their walk as trained and stood a nice respectful distance as I laid the piles out... funny how that is lol.
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post #119 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 01:52 PM
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We are trying to diagnose a problem based solely on your descriptions of what is going on. With each piece of the conversation another clue is added to the picture. This is not the easiest way to sort out an issue with a horse/owner, but it is what we have.

I do agree that there seems to be holes in your horse's training. I seems that she has not been taught to respect your space. One exercise that I frequently use, and am using a LOT with the woman I mentioned earlier, is a leading exercise.

I use a rope halter (I get faster results with it). With between 2-3 feet of lead rope between the horse and the person leading, I have the person stick the thumb of the hand holding the lead in their front pocket or belt loop and walk, just walk. If the horse does not move, I have them just maintain the pressure till the horse does move. Then, at a random moment, I have them stop. If the horse does not stop I have them MAKE the horse back up. Like you like to say, "rinse and repeat".
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post #120 of 134 Old 10-01-2015, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
Yes, horses will test the boundaries.
The horse that keeps testing those boundaries on a regular basis, has not been taught where those boundaries lie.

The horse knows that you are a novice and is probably taking the proverbial Mickey, cannot blame her for that.

Using her age as a reason for bad behaviour is just an excuse.

Learn the 'feel' so you can read what the horse is thinking and stop something before it happens.

Unless all the ground problems are sorted then she is not going to respect you when it comes to riding her.
So true! :) I was so inexp. when I got my mare!! And learned so much with my trainer, that I never would have bought her had I not had that trainer there to hold my hand in the usual form of bopping my upside the head for being stupid when I was handling her. lol

I also love the comment on testing boundaries due to trying to find them... Such a true thing with animals of any type. :) And humans too :)
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