Bridling difficulties - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 04:48 PM
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Put your right hand, holding the crown of the bridle, between her ears and use your left hand to hold and direct the bit. Still be gentle but your right forearm will keep her from raising her head to avoid the bit. You'll know she's happy with type and placement of the bit if she stops trying to play with it a few seconds, maybe up to a minute, after you get it all situated.

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post #12 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 05:11 PM
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One of the most difficult horses I ever had to bridle was a remedial. He was really bad and it took me some time before he would accept the bit easily. He was also being worked by me and relaxing and trusting me so that helped.

He was soon no problem, even little children could bridle him.

After I had been working him for three weeks his owner came to see him. She led him back to the stable and when she went to take the bridle off she was pulling it away before he had time to drop the bit.

Hence the reason why he didn't want his bridle on.

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post #13 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 05:48 PM
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Are you working with a trainer or a riding instructor? You might need more instruction, but I'm coming at this as a complete novice who is still learning about all the tack. It's taking me time to learn how to get it right. For me, I know it isn't the horse. It's operator error. Make sure you have someone there to check that you're doing it all correctly, unless you know for certain that you really understand the tack.
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post #14 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 05:48 PM
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I was taught to bridle the way that JCnGrace described and it's always worked well for me. But, definitely be sure that her teeth don't need to be floated.
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post #15 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 07:06 PM
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Horses will usually try to pick up things with their lips when they feel them. If she tries to pick up the bit with her lips and then you are pulling it up into her mouth too fast and banging her teeth, she may have decided that she doesn't like it anymore. Somehow, she is feeling uncomfortable about the bridle.

Get a knowledgeable person to watch you bridle and see what the problem is. He/she can then help you do it properly and you can practice. Most bridling problems are the result of the person doing the bridling.

If she has already started to resist no matter what, like putting her head way up, I had good luck with following her head up with the bit and then lowering my hand as she lowered her head. When she tried to move away I spun her around in a tight circle and tried again. It took 3 tries/spins and then she took it well. I did this under the supervision/advice of my trainer. I had been pulling the bit up into her mouth too fast because I had accidently gotten bitten once and subconsciously was afraid of that, so I was not giving her a chance to open her mouth. I created the problem.

When you get better, she will get better. Have someone help you hand on.
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post #16 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
Couple nights ago she was so fussy that I had to eventually give up (as much as I didnt want her to have her way).
That's the worst possible thing you can do as you've effectively told the horse that it's won at that point...and the issue will just get worse. If a horse can figure out a way to get out of work he/she isn't interested in doing many will continue to take that avenue out in the future. If this horse has decided to refuse the bit simply as a tactic to avoid work...well, you've given the horse an easy tactic to avoid work moving forward.

Once you've ruled out pain (as others have mentioned, when was this horses teeth last floated?) and then ensured you're using the proper tactics (banging the bit against the teeth on the way in and out is wrong) then there are other tactics (I use a finger massage on the gums personally which usually gets them to open) but giving up is the wrong approach.
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post #17 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 09:11 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
Couple nights ago she was so fussy that I had to eventually give up (as much as I didnt want her to have her way).
That's the worst possible thing you can do as you've effectively told the horse that it's won at that point...and the issue will just get worse. If a horse can figure out a way to get out of work he/she isn't interested in doing many will continue to take that avenue out in the future. If this horse has decided to refuse the bit simply as a tactic to avoid work...well, you've given the horse an easy tactic to avoid work moving forward.

Once you've ruled out pain (as others have mentioned, when was this horses teeth last floated?) and then ensured you're using the proper tactics (banging the bit against the teeth on the way in and out is wrong) then there are other tactics (I use a finger massage on the gums personally which usually gets them to open) but giving up is the wrong approach.
I know it was wrong togive up and i usually dont give up until they give in but she just wasnt having any of it that night.

My trainer has watched me do it and said im fine, i just need to be a bit more assertive if she gets fussy. If she pulls her head back, i go back with her.she said shes confident it will improve over time.

The saddle is a different story, im already very comfortable putting it on and taking it off and she doesnt get fussy. Cant wait to get my own saddle.

My biggest struggle i find putting on her bridle is keeping her head still. This of course only relates to putting the bit in, once its in, its smooth sailing for me.

Her teeth have never been floated.previous owner said shes never seen a need for them done unless she has trouble eating.

But i kind of see teeth floating as a must done routine on every horse regardless of problems or not.
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post #18 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 09:18 PM
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As a youngster my Arab developed hooks all the time, so I had his floated twice a year. Finally, at the age of 12, he didn't need them floated in the spring. But I do have my appointment for October.

So have her teeth checked by your BO. Having them floated, if needed, could help with the issue at hand.
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post #19 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 09:22 PM
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Yes horses teeth need floated once a year. Sometimes twice depending on the horse.

I would get her teeth done ASAP. My gelding's teeth had never been floated until I got him, but his previous owner still rode him in a bit. Now (even though his teeth have been floated twice, and he has no other problems with them), he absolutely hates bits. It doesn't matter what kind it is, or who's riding him, he will not put up with it at all.
I'm not saying this will happen to your horse. Just sharing an experience to a similar situation.

I personally wouldn't try bridling her again until her teeth get floated.

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post #20 of 134 Old 09-27-2015, 10:00 PM
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Has she always been this way about bridling or has she recently developed the resistance? I could not believe how quickly the circling worked for me, pulling her into a tight circle around around me when she resisted. Worth a try as long as it is not a teeth issue.
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