Bridling difficulties - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
 200Likes
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #31 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 12:49 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Neverland
Posts: 535
• Horses: 0
I just stck my hand in there and feel for sharp edges along the cheek. I also float my horse's teeth myself so I have a speculum that I can use to get a good look in their if I need to. But I wouldn't really recommend sticking your hand in your horse's mouth if you aren't comfortable. If she's never had it done, then it's safe to assume she needs it. At her age it's also very possible that she has wolf teeth that need to come out. I think you should just go ahead get the equine dentist out there.

It's not fair ro you horse to make her carry a bit if her teeth have sharp edges or if she has wolf teeth. So if i were you I would ask your barn owner if he will check her mouth for you so you know if uou need to hold off on making her pack a bit.


As for the bridling issues. I would recommend you practice putting in on over her halter, with the lead rope tied to the fence so that she can't get away from you.

First, before even messing with the bridle I would teach her to drop her head as someone else already mentioned. Place your hand on her poll (top of her head just behind her ears) then use your fingers to press and apply pressure to her poll. Keep increasing pressure until you get some sort of response. Her first response is likely to be to push against you and raise her head. DO NOT REMOVE ANY PRESSURE if she does that. But as soon as you feel her move away from the pressure and drop her head even the slightest tiniest bit, remove your hand completely and give her a pet. Then repeat over and over again until you can get her to drop her head low. Always starting with just placing your hand gently on her poll first, then adding finger pressure. That way, eventually she'll drop her head just from you placing your hand on her poll bc she knows what's coming next.
Then I would work on teaching her the cue to open her mouth without having the bit in your hand first. That way if she has issues/anxiety about having the bit put in you don't have to deal with it yet. Stick your thumb in her mouth right there on the side where she has no teeth and wiggle it a little. If she opens her mouth remove all pressure then pet and repeat. If she doesn't open stick your thumbnail into her gum with increasing pressure until she opens, then immediately release and pet. Do this enough times until she'll open with slight pressure from your thumb on the side of her mouth. With this, the cue to lower her head and having her haltered and tied you have some tools to help you be successful.
I know your instructor told you to reach your right hand under her throat, but i think you'll find it easier to hold your right arm up at her poll, especially after teaching her that is the cue to drop her head. Like in this picture
The part you would be holding onto is called the crown piece. (The part that goes across her forehead is called the browband and the part that buckles under her throat is called the throatlatch) Gentle bring the bit to her mouth. If she doesnt readily open her mouth, use the cue you taught her with your thumb. When she opens very nicely slide the bit in without banging her teeth, then gently slide the crown piece over her ears and pet her. You want the bit sitting on top of her tongue. Occasionally they will get their tongue over the bit and you want to be sure to notice if that happens soyou can fix it. Many horses will react badly if you miss it and try to ride like that.
Once you can bridle her with no issues with the halter on, then try it without the halter. With the leadrope still tied to the fence, remove the halter from her face and fasten it around her neck, like the gal in this photo has done , tight enough that she can't get out of it if she pulls back. And practice putting the bridle on the same way.


Hope I explained that well enough that it makes sense.
Posted via Mobile Device
anndankev, bsms, greentree and 3 others like this.
enh817 is offline  
post #32 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 01:42 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New South Wales, Australia
Posts: 4,863
• Horses: 1
It certainly won't hurt to have your dentist out for an appointment. Even if the teeth aren't causing problems they can just do general maintenance.

I partly go by the dropping food idea, basically my dentist visits are max 2 years apart (often a bit less) but if there is any sign of discomfort like dropping food or bit issues I get them out early. However it does depend on their lifestyle, mine is an adult horse is on pasture 24/7 with no hay and varied pastures. If he were fed more hay and processed feeds I would probably get his teeth done yearly.

I haven't had any issues
Chasin Ponies likes this.
Saskia is offline  
post #33 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 10:09 AM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 5,044
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by enh817 View Post
I just stck my hand in there and feel for sharp edges along the cheek. I also float my horse's teeth myself so I have a speculum that I can use to get a good look in their if I need to. But I wouldn't really recommend sticking your hand in your horse's mouth if you aren't comfortable. If she's never had it done, then it's safe to assume she needs it. At her age it's also very possible that she has wolf teeth that need to come out. I think you should just go ahead get the equine dentist out there.

It's not fair ro you horse to make her carry a bit if her teeth have sharp edges or if she has wolf teeth. So if i were you I would ask your barn owner if he will check her mouth for you so you know if uou need to hold off on making her pack a bit.


As for the bridling issues. I would recommend you practice putting in on over her halter, with the lead rope tied to the fence so that she can't get away from you.

First, before even messing with the bridle I would teach her to drop her head as someone else already mentioned. Place your hand on her poll (top of her head just behind her ears) then use your fingers to press and apply pressure to her poll. Keep increasing pressure until you get some sort of response. Her first response is likely to be to push against you and raise her head. DO NOT REMOVE ANY PRESSURE if she does that. But as soon as you feel her move away from the pressure and drop her head even the slightest tiniest bit, remove your hand completely and give her a pet. Then repeat over and over again until you can get her to drop her head low. Always starting with just placing your hand gently on her poll first, then adding finger pressure. That way, eventually she'll drop her head just from you placing your hand on her poll bc she knows what's coming next.
Then I would work on teaching her the cue to open her mouth without having the bit in your hand first. That way if she has issues/anxiety about having the bit put in you don't have to deal with it yet. Stick your thumb in her mouth right there on the side where she has no teeth and wiggle it a little. If she opens her mouth remove all pressure then pet and repeat. If she doesn't open stick your thumbnail into her gum with increasing pressure until she opens, then immediately release and pet. Do this enough times until she'll open with slight pressure from your thumb on the side of her mouth. With this, the cue to lower her head and having her haltered and tied you have some tools to help you be successful.
I know your instructor told you to reach your right hand under her throat, but i think you'll find it easier to hold your right arm up at her poll, especially after teaching her that is the cue to drop her head. Like in this picture
The part you would be holding onto is called the crown piece. (The part that goes across her forehead is called the browband and the part that buckles under her throat is called the throatlatch) Gentle bring the bit to her mouth. If she doesnt readily open her mouth, use the cue you taught her with your thumb. When she opens very nicely slide the bit in without banging her teeth, then gently slide the crown piece over her ears and pet her. You want the bit sitting on top of her tongue. Occasionally they will get their tongue over the bit and you want to be sure to notice if that happens soyou can fix it. Many horses will react badly if you miss it and try to ride like that.
Once you can bridle her with no issues with the halter on, then try it without the halter. With the leadrope still tied to the fence, remove the halter from her face and fasten it around her neck, like the gal in this photo has done , tight enough that she can't get out of it if she pulls back. And practice putting the bridle on the same way.


Hope I explained that well enough that it makes sense.
Posted via Mobile Device
Not sure if I want to ask the BO to check her teeth, hes already pretty busy as is and dont want him to think im leeching off him for free services. I will enquire about having a dentist out, but obviously it will cost me money.

I will teach her how to lower head head from applying light pressure on her poll. I know she knows it from giving downward pressure from her lead.
The verbal que I give is "head"

I keep her halter on when putting her bit in. Few nights ago she was being very rude and moving her head into me and as well as her body and even after several correctings, I felt it was best to stop so that i didnt get run over.
Hoofpic is offline  
post #34 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 10:13 AM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 5,044
• Horses: 0
I called my vet clinic and they said $150 to get the teeth floated and $60 to just check them. Plus travel fee (around $70).
Hoofpic is offline  
post #35 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 11:45 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Neverland
Posts: 535
• Horses: 0
Ouch! That's why O just do them myself (i was taught by a very knowledgeable person and have all the proper tools) Maybe see if any of the other boarders at the barn need their horse's teeth done so you guys could split the travel fee. If your horse has wolf teeth, they HAVE to come out, and it's basically a munor surgery so I'm sure they'd want to charge out the butt for that too.

If I. were you, I'd call around to other vets and equine dentist and compare prices. It's something that any of them should be able to do fine (though ive seen plenty of bad teeth jobs done by people who should've been able to do better, another reason I do it myself)

If she was still running you over, your corrections weren't strong enough. It is completely unacceptable for her to shove into you, don't let that be a way out for her or things are going to get dangerous fast! Make sure your corrections relate to the behavior.
Posted via Mobile Device
MomH likes this.
enh817 is offline  
post #36 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 12:14 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 7,438
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
I called my vet clinic and they said $150 to get the teeth floated and $60 to just check them. Plus travel fee (around $70).
Horses are expensive. They are a luxury item.

If your horse has never had its teeth floated, I'll go out on a limb and guarantee she's going to need something done.

Horses need general maintenance and should at least be checked once a year. Some horses need it every 6 months.

Honestly, I would either ride with something bitless, or not ride at all until you can get her teeth taken care of. It's not fair to the horse to be expected to behave perfectly if she has pain from the bit or her mouth.

Most of the time, mares don't have wolf teeth so that shouldn't be the issue, but it isn't impossible for them to have them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
Her teeth have never been floated.previous owner said shes never seen a need for them done unless she has trouble eating.
This is a myth. Horses can have dental issues but appear to eat just fine.

As one example, my horse Red gets his teeth done every year like clockwork. He's a horrible messy eater, and drops grain all over the place. I borrowed my aunt's horse for a brief period this summer and I know he needed his teeth done b/c it had been at least 3 years, or longer. He didn't drop a single grain morsel.

So a horse that does or does not have trouble eating is NOT a good indicator on if they need their teeth done.
egrogan and Foxhunter like this.

∞*˚ Βгįťţαňγ ˚*∞
It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
beau159 is offline  
post #37 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 12:51 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 5,044
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by enh817 View Post
Ouch! That's why O just do them myself (i was taught by a very knowledgeable person and have all the proper tools) Maybe see if any of the other boarders at the barn need their horse's teeth done so you guys could split the travel fee. If your horse has wolf teeth, they HAVE to come out, and it's basically a munor surgery so I'm sure they'd want to charge out the butt for that too.

If I. were you, I'd call around to other vets and equine dentist and compare prices. It's something that any of them should be able to do fine (though ive seen plenty of bad teeth jobs done by people who should've been able to do better, another reason I do it myself)

If she was still running you over, your corrections weren't strong enough. It is completely unacceptable for her to shove into you, don't let that be a way out for her or things are going to get dangerous fast! Make sure your corrections relate to the behavior.
Posted via Mobile Device
Ok I will do that but I corrected her hard a couple nights ago. I whacked her real hard on the neck.

She was of course still tied up with very little slack so I couldnt back her up.

I will call and book for a dentist to come out this week. Do you think I should just get her teeth floated period and if say the dentist checks and says its not needed, then dont do it?

It would be better to do that instead of saying Im booking for a checkup, then float if needed cause that will be more expensive and possibly have to make two trips out (which I want to avoid).
Hoofpic is offline  
post #38 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 03:40 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Michigan, USA
Posts: 1,067
• Horses: 0
Have you tried pulling her into a tight circle around you? Whacking her for correction will get you nowhere.
DraftyAiresMum and MomH like this.
Whinnie is offline  
post #39 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 04:30 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Neverland
Posts: 535
• Horses: 0
Yes I would just go ahead and book a floating. I wpuld be very very surprised if she didn't need it sibce she's never been done before.
Posted via Mobile Device
enh817 is offline  
post #40 of 134 Old 09-28-2015, 04:40 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vermont
Posts: 6,951
• Horses: 3
Many boarding barns in my area schedule appointments for fall shots and floating, and spring shots and floating- all the horses in the barn are checked by the vet on that one day. So you are paying the vet farm call fee but you are splitting it between all boarders. You are taking care of the "check-up" and any required shots, while also having teeth checked.

There are varying opinions about having a "regular" vet do a dental checkup vs. using an equine dentist. I use my regular vet and am comfortable with that, but it's a personal decision.

If the vet/dentist says floating is not needed, and you trust that person, I would take their advice and not have anything done. For example, my mare was checked last spring and had no sharp hooks or other problems, so she did not require any floating at that time. She had been floated the previous fall. This fall at the fall check-up, she required some filing of her pre-molars and had a bit of tartar removed. But unlike last fall, she did not require sedation and power tools, and it was all done manually. Point being, even with a horse who gets a "check-up" every six month, the needs are not always the same, particularly as they age.
Foxhunter and jaydee like this.
egrogan is offline  
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lunging difficulties buzzoff Horse Training 11 07-22-2015 01:02 AM
Help- fear and riding difficulties LilacsBloom New to Horses 24 10-05-2013 01:48 PM
Please help with lunging difficulties. NewForestNay Horse Training 7 01-24-2011 05:38 PM
Lunging Difficulties problogger Horse Training 1 09-22-2009 11:20 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome