Bridling difficulties - Page 7 - The Horse Forum
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post #61 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
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I will say that the good news is that since bringing her into the new barn, she is considerably MUCH better standing tied when in the barn than when I first brought her in. And I think a lot of it has to do with the fact with familiarity and shes gotten used to the new barn.

In the first few days I wasnt even able to groom her because she kept shifting over left and right constantly and I was spending so much time moving her over. But now, she is so much better.

She will still be rude when she wants and move her hind my way, but I aggresively move her back. And if she does it again, I will wallop her hard on the belly and with her being very sensitive, it gets her attention alright. Her head and ears go up right away.

People have mentioned for as a third time (if she were to do it a third time) to stick out the end of my hoofpic. Im still unclear on how this exactly works. Cause when she comes into you, youre almost gaurenteed to take at least one step back so she doesnt run over you. So if you were to stick the end of your hoofpic at her barrel, its not going to do anything. Someone please clear this up for me?

She even did this to the trainer a couple times and I watched how she corrected her and she did just as I did...took a quick small step back to get out of the way but then immediately aggresively moved her hind back over by putting lots of pressure on her hind and walking into her.

If she swings my way when tied, I apply a lot of pressure on her hind. Literally push with both hands while walking into her.

If she swings away from me when tied, I apply light pressure on her hind, just 2 fingers and lightly on her hind with me standing still.

So hopefully she is able to differientiate the significant differences in pressure between the two scenarios.

Last edited by Hoofpic; 09-30-2015 at 11:16 AM.
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post #62 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 11:14 AM
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One of the things I've done when introducing bridling to a horse is to take the bit off the bridle for a while. I get the horse to let me put the bridle on and off until that's real old hat. Then I attach the bit only on the right side and leave it hanging loose while I put the headstall on. Once it's on, I take the bit and get the horse to open their mouth and I slide the bit in and out, so they get used to the feel. Then I attach the bit on the left side and then start taking the bridle off, being very careful of the bit like BSMS said. It takes a little longer to get them acustomed to it this way, but I've had good results.
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post #63 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 11:21 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
One of the things I've done when introducing bridling to a horse is to take the bit off the bridle for a while. I get the horse to let me put the bridle on and off until that's real old hat. Then I attach the bit only on the right side and leave it hanging loose while I put the headstall on. Once it's on, I take the bit and get the horse to open their mouth and I slide the bit in and out, so they get used to the feel. Then I attach the bit on the left side and then start taking the bridle off, being very careful of the bit like BSMS said. It takes a little longer to get them acustomed to it this way, but I've had good results.
But my horse has already had quite some time and experience with a bit in her mouth (from previous owner).

Though I did get a new bit for her, do you think because I got a new bit for her that this applies as a new piece of gear for her to need to get used to?

The first day I got the bit, I let her wear it for 30mins. The 2nd day I let her wear it for around 20mins. Both days she was chewing and playing with the bit in her mouth quite a bit. Probably getting used to it.

But since then, the bit goes in, she might play with it for a bit but then stands pretty quiet with it for the rest of the time.
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post #64 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 11:27 AM
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I still think you should be addressing these problems with your trainer. WE cannot see exactly what the horse doingto avoid you, which is obviously what she is doing. She is STILL MENTALLY running over you.

Until you get upbthe gumption to STOP her from doing these things, and stand up to her, they are all going to continue.
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post #65 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
Yes I can try bridling her when loose/not tied but it would have to be either outside, in her pasture paddock or in the arena.

This actually sounds like a great idea (obviously only for the time being until she gets better). I might start trying this tonight!



You are trying to get her to give her mouth and if she moves into you, which if you have her head turned towards you, she is going to move away.

If you smack her on the muzzle she is not going to want to give her head to you.

Try and think logically, try and think like you were in the horse's position.



No no, mentioned in my post earlier that I have not smacked her yet for refusing and fighting with me to put her bit in. I have just moved her hind end over, aggresively. Cause thats what Ive been doing whenever she wants to move her body into my direction when tied. I immeidately get her to move her hind over and aggresively with me walking into towards her and trust me she moves alright!
I realized that. :) That was why I said that I didn't think it would help. That coupled with the fact that you say when you did smack her for other things, she just stares at you unmiffed.
My daughter's gelding is 17, we got him only last year, so he has been around the block so to speak. I am sure he has seen his fair share of smacks for poor behavior. Popping him doesn't usually get you anywhere. He just moves out of reach before you can do it, because he KNOWS his mouth shouldn't be opened on a human, but occasionally he must still try lol.
My 12 year old-not-so-horsey-daughter has taught him that if his head moves from the normal, loose, front position when she is handling him, he gets an elbow up, if he makes contact, that is his fault for the misbehavior. It works for her quite well. All she does is tell him 'head' which he has learned means "I am to stand here still and not snuffle around on the human whatsoever as she cleans my feet, etc."
We are 100% vigilant with him so we do have time to pop him one when it's deserved. Sounds like you are in the same boat.
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post #66 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
But my horse has already had quite some time and experience with a bit in her mouth (from previous owner).

Though I did get a new bit for her, do you think because I got a new bit for her that this applies as a new piece of gear for her to need to get used to?

The first day I got the bit, I let her wear it for 30mins. The 2nd day I let her wear it for around 20mins. Both days she was chewing and playing with the bit in her mouth quite a bit. Probably getting used to it.

But since then, the bit goes in, she might play with it for a bit but then stands pretty quiet with it for the rest of the time.
If she has been extensively bitted before, then the new bit shouldn't make a big difference for getting it in there. Sure, give her on the ground time to get used to the new one before riding her in it (for your safety), but taking it- no she has your number and knows it. :) My husband's gelding was just like that when we switched to a bit. He already is a *massively* stubborn mustang anyway, so it makes life interesting. :) But we just tried longer than him so we would win.

Don't ever put her up without that bit going in her mouth, like it was previously said. Even if you have to re-situate your brain and her for a moment... win still.
Chewing and playing is fine. All 3 of ours ride in simple full cheek snaffles. The 2 appys like to bite and chew them. The mustang just stands there and drools enough for a kiddy pool lol.

Definitely getting a trainer or other knowledgeable person there to help you or just hang out will help you de-stress and improve your situation. :)
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post #67 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 11:50 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by GracielaGata View Post
I realized that. :) That was why I said that I didn't think it would help. That coupled with the fact that you say when you did smack her for other things, she just stares at you unmiffed.
My daughter's gelding is 17, we got him only last year, so he has been around the block so to speak. I am sure he has seen his fair share of smacks for poor behavior. Popping him doesn't usually get you anywhere. He just moves out of reach before you can do it, because he KNOWS his mouth shouldn't be opened on a human, but occasionally he must still try lol.
My 12 year old-not-so-horsey-daughter has taught him that if his head moves from the normal, loose, front position when she is handling him, he gets an elbow up, if he makes contact, that is his fault for the misbehavior. It works for her quite well. All she does is tell him 'head' which he has learned means "I am to stand here still and not snuffle around on the human whatsoever as she cleans my feet, etc."
We are 100% vigilant with him so we do have time to pop him one when it's deserved. Sounds like you are in the same boat.
Well smacking her on her neck or shoulder doesnt do anything.

Walloping her on the muzzle, hind (with a whip, or i would break my hand) or on her belly DOES get her immediate attention, every single time.
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post #68 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
Well smacking her on her neck or shoulder doesnt do anything.

Walloping her on the muzzle, hind (with a whip, or i would break my hand) or on her belly DOES get her immediate attention, every single time.
:) I still don't think smacking for not bridling is the proper way to get her to bridle. :) (Not saying you said this, :) )
My mare and the mustang, you barely have to touch when you smack, and they act like you are killing them. So literally 99% of the time, they never get smacked, because they don't do the behavior lol. Though the mustang, since he is a gelding, he gets mouthy a bit here and there. A light pop on the muzzle corrects it fast. It can be *very* light because it matches his personality.
If we were to use a whip, both of those 2 horses would nearly line up at attention and ask how high I wanted them to jump or how many push ups I wanted, drill sergeant! lol

My daughter's 17 year old gelding... ha. Whips are a joke, as is most smacking. I have discovered a few ways of quick pops with a whip that get his attention. But again- I try to set them up to not need the smacks. So usually the whip is only needed when I have to open gates in the pasture for all 3 to go through when loose, and I need him and the other 2 to back up. The whip gives me a safer working distance to do what I need. Sometimes her boy does get popped with it in the chest because he is pushing into my space to get to the gate.
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post #69 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 12:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
But my horse has already had quite some time and experience with a bit in her mouth (from previous owner).

Though I did get a new bit for her, do you think because I got a new bit for her that this applies as a new piece of gear for her to need to get used to?

The first day I got the bit, I let her wear it for 30mins. The 2nd day I let her wear it for around 20mins. Both days she was chewing and playing with the bit in her mouth quite a bit. Probably getting used to it.

But since then, the bit goes in, she might play with it for a bit but then stands pretty quiet with it for the rest of the time.
The main reason I suggest undoing the bit from one side and bridling her up without the bit in her mouth is so that she quits trying to evade you. She has experience with someone else, not you. So, in her mind, she has no experience except dodging whatever you are doing. To stop that, I suggested putting the bridle on because you can halter her, and once you have the bridle on, you have reins with which to help control her and you can still tie her if need be with the lead rope because you leave the halter on, if I recall correctly what you've written. Once she's got the bridle on, it should be fairly easy to slip the bit between her teeth and you've really given her no way to evade you.
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post #70 of 134 Old 09-30-2015, 12:12 PM
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If you are resorting t using a whip in the stable something is terribly wrong!

If you are doing things correctly then a mere 'Eh' should suffice by now.

A hard poke with a finger should get her attention.

Hitting her with a whip is only going to sour her.
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