Buying - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 18 Old 11-24-2015, 05:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abbygibson1212 View Post
I may be buying a new horse on Sunday, I have never bought one on my own before, so what questions do I need to ask the current owner?
Things I like to ask:

- Are he easy to catch?
- Does he hold feet nicely for the farrier?
- Is he up-to-date on vaccinations and dewormer?
- Why are you selling the horse?
- How long have you owned him?
- Do they load into the trailer?
- Where (if any) have you taken the horse? Any shows or trailer riding?
- Is he buddy sour? Barn sour?
- When have his teeth been checked last?
- Is he spooky?

When I show up, I honestly DON'T want the horse caught. I want to walk with them to go catch the horse, and see everything. Brushing, handling, tacking, etc. Then I want the seller to ride the horse first. (If the seller won't, that's one big red flag to walk away....) Then if I like what I see, then I will ride the horse.

I also like to watch the horse move on the straight line, to and away from me, to examine how they move.

Quote:
Originally Posted by abbygibson1212 View Post
He's registered so surely they wouldn't be able to lie about his age, because it would be on the papers?
Of course you'll want to look at the physical description on the papers, to ensure it matches what you see.

Also make sure he is registered in the seller's name; and if not, they need to have a signed transfer report from the previous seller.

Quote:
Originally Posted by abbygibson1212 View Post
I do have a clear picture of his backside and of his head.
Kinda blurry, but head appears pretty.

One thing you want to watch out for with pink-skinned horses is MELANOMA. They are much more prone to cancer because of it.

Not a huge fan of his hocks as he is rather cow-hocked in the picture you posted, but ultimately depends on what you want to use him for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by abbygibson1212 View Post
he stands good for the farrier because you can tell that he has shoes on in all the videos.
Just because you see shoes on his feet, does NOT mean he stands good for the farrier. I've seen horses have to be sedated for the farrier.

You'll need to see in person to make sure he handles his feet nice.

One thing I would ask the sellers is WHY does he need shoes? Does he have bad feet? Does he have a lameness problem that requires it? There must be a reason for the shoes on such a young horse.


Quote:
Originally Posted by abbygibson1212 View Post
Oh, and during the winter months when the weather is bad, and everything is hectic with the holidays, and especially if you have a job on top of everything, how often should you be riding to keep them sharp? I know people say every single day but I don't think that's exactly possible this time a year is it?
Depends on the horse.

Some will get cold-backed when they aren't ridden on a regular basis.
Some will get a little frisky but not bad.
And some will be the same ol' horse, no matter how little you ride.

So it really depends.

If this horse is a TRUE beginner horse, he should stay the same ol' same ol' no matter what. True beginner horses are hard to come by.

∞*˚ Βгįťţαňγ ˚*∞
It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
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post #12 of 18 Old 11-24-2015, 06:05 PM
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No matter what the seller says the horse will do, you need to see it done for yourself. A vet check (your own vet, not the sellers) needs to be done. Best scenario is at least a one week trial where you can bring him home to ride him before purchase or a complete refund after one week if he doesn't work out (written purchase agreement witnessed). Two weeks are better. Some sellers will use mild sedative on a horse for sale so he is nice and quiet when you are trying him out, but when you get him home, he wakes up.
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post #13 of 18 Old 11-25-2015, 12:40 AM Thread Starter
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I think they shoe him because they ride on pavement a lot, from the looks of it all of their horses are shoed. And what does cow hocked mean?
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post #14 of 18 Old 11-25-2015, 01:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beau159 View Post

Depends on the horse.

Some will get cold-backed when they aren't ridden on a regular basis.
Some will get a little frisky but not bad.
And some will be the same ol' horse, no matter how little you ride.

So it really depends.

If this horse is a TRUE beginner horse, he should stay the same ol' same ol' no matter what. True beginner horses are hard to come by.

This is something you can ask as well: how often is he ridden?, is he better when ridden regularly or is he okay if he sits for a while? (don't let her know what you prefer before asking the questions).
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post #15 of 18 Old 11-25-2015, 01:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abbygibson1212 View Post
I think they shoe him because they ride on pavement a lot, from the looks of it all of their horses are shoed. And what does cow hocked mean?
Don't assume anything about the shoes, simply ask, and also ask if he's been barefoot.

Cow hocked: https://www.google.com/gws_rd=ssl#q=cow+hocked+horse
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post #16 of 18 Old 11-25-2015, 07:08 AM
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All the questions asked so far are good ones to ask. You can also take it a step further and IF you like this horse, go see him again on a different day, preferably with little advance notice. And IF you decide to buy him, you can suggest a sales contract that includes some of that information (medical history, etc.) so they have to put it in writing. Finally, we found that few people were willing to do a free trial, but for our horse (in the avatar), they offered to include a two-week buy back clause. In other words, if, in two weeks, we found something about him we didn't like, they would buy him back for the asking price. It's been two months and we still have him :) But it put my mind at ease to have a guarantee in place.

DO ask to ride him more than once. One horse we saw was good on the first day, but terrible a week later. I don't know why, but some are like that - moody and unpredictable.
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post #17 of 18 Old 11-25-2015, 12:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whinnie View Post
Best scenario is at least a one week trial
I don't sell horses very often, but when I do, I would NEVER do a trial. Either the horse is sold, or not.

I am more than happy to show the horse as many times as the potential buyers wants, but the horse does not leave my hands.

Some people will do trials OP, but just don't be surprised if they tell you "no" on a trial.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
you can suggest a sales contract that includes some of that information (medical history, etc.) so they have to put it in writing.
You can do this if you want, and I as a seller would have no problem doing it, but you have to understand that horse sales are AS IS. Once the horse is "sold" it's very difficult to proove that an owner knew of an issue and lied, because it could be possible that the horse now developed it and the previous owner truly had no knowledge of it.

For example, you buy a horse. Two weeks later it colics and dies. Is it the previous owner's fault? No, probably not. Just unfortunate circumstances and "as is".
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∞*˚ Βгįťţαňγ ˚*∞
It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
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post #18 of 18 Old 11-25-2015, 09:52 PM Thread Starter
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Well I highly doubt that they would do a trial, I don't know a single person who would sell a horse on trial, at least not around here, heck, I wouldn't even do it. And going to see him another day with little notice is pretty much out of the question because he is 4 hours from me. I'm feeling pretty confident though, I've got a whole list of questions to ask and I'll make sure they ride him through all his gates for me. And I know they are wanting to spend a significant amount of time talking to me. And of course my grandpa will be with me and he'll have questions of his own to ask and I'll be able to get his opinion on the horse. I'm not too worried about the cow hocked, as long as it doesn't interfere with riding I don't mind how it looks, and I'll just be riding him around the farm leisurely anyways. No shows or racing or anything like that. Just trail rides. So hopefully I see him and he's a good sound horse with a good personality, because so far what I've seen I really like him. I wanna have my next horse for a good twenty years before I have to think about buying another, I've made too many mistakes in the past buying green broke or stubborn horses.
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