Confidence lost... - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 34 Old 08-20-2014, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Chasin Ponies View Post
The lesson horse's complete personality and behavior changes when a rider become competent. He's happier, more willing and reverts back to his basic good training. Obviously the rider is happier too!

Unfortunately beginners jerk, poke, bounce around and lose their balance which makes any horse very, very sour. That's why it's important for an instructor not to torture a horse by only putting beginners on him-he needs to remember how to do things right and that being ridden is not always a miserable experience!
Ha, this sounds like me :) When I first started I would ride the lesson horse mare-- and she was sweet, but testy. Great for small kids, but it is like she knows when an adult is handling her and then she started to push the envelope a little bit here and there. She would cut corners, head for the gate anytime I was trying to warm her up in the arena, go slow when I was "asking" her to go faster, etc.

After taking lessons for a couple months and building my confidence--we went OUT on a trail ride, and she was like a whole new creature! Now when we work in the arena, she works! Same with the gelding I ride sometimes, he liked to push buttons, but my trainer taught me how to be assertive and it makes a world of difference.

The essential joy of being with horses is that it brings us in contact with the rare elements of grace, beauty, spirit, and fire. ~Sharon Ralls Lemon
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post #22 of 34 Old 08-20-2014, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by FerrumEquus View Post
I've watched a woman who has been riding all her life be tossed off a gelding she described as 'perfectly safe', and who she had owned for almost a decade. I mean, he bucked her right off, no qualms about it. That really shocked me. It's one thing to say beginners mess up horses and end up being thrown because they do it all wrong and ruin the horse, but when you see experienced people being thrown by horses they swear are gentle and safe, it makes you question not just people's judgement, but the safety of horses in general.
I had a related experience yesterday. I posted on another thread, but long story short I got bucked right off of my instructor's horse. One that she swears up and down is calm and safe, and that she regularly puts 6 year olds on for lessons. She swears she's never seen the horse buck before, and honestly 99% of the time I have to work my *** off to get the horse to move beyond a fast walk (she is the epitome of lazy). Anyway, all that to say both my body and my ego are bruised today, and I'm second guessing my desire to take up this sport. Thanks for voicing your fears, and don't feel alone. I'm right there with you today!
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post #23 of 34 Old 08-20-2014, 07:13 PM Thread Starter
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I had a related experience yesterday. I posted on another thread, but long story short I got bucked right off of my instructor's horse. One that she swears up and down is calm and safe, and that she regularly puts 6 year olds on for lessons. She swears she's never seen the horse buck before, and honestly 99% of the time I have to work my *** off to get the horse to move beyond a fast walk (she is the epitome of lazy). Anyway, all that to say both my body and my ego are bruised today, and I'm second guessing my desire to take up this sport. Thanks for voicing your fears, and don't feel alone. I'm right there with you today!
I am no expert on horses obviously, but it seems to me that horses that won't walk on properly in the first place are snotty and avoiding work and probably will buck if they are pushed too far beyond what they're willing to do. The horse I fell off was of that type, and she bucked all the time when pushed beyond a trot. Obviously, you need to be a good rider to ride that stuff out. Personally, I have no desire to ride petulant animals who want me off them so badly they're willing to risk my life.

I could be completely wrong of course, just speaking from my personal experience.
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post #24 of 34 Old 08-20-2014, 08:20 PM
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^Ferrum, I think it's important to consider *why* they're 'snotty' & 'petulant', and it is very frequently due to discomfort/pain. Perhaps the horse CAN'T go faster than a trot under saddle without pain. Saddle discomfort/pressure points has been measured to be about 3 times as strong at a canter as at the walk & trot, for eg. Seeing as the rider is 'ignoring' her signals(she will indeed have tried to 'tell' the rider beforehand, & in inverted commas cos I realise it's not intentional), she feels the need to 'shout' about it, when the rider keeps pushing.

In saying the above, I realise that many experienced people aren't good at reading/understanding/considering the horse, let alone if you're new to the 'game', so that's where a good, considerate(of the horse as well as the rider) instructor comes in.
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post #25 of 34 Old 08-20-2014, 09:47 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
^Ferrum, I think it's important to consider *why* they're 'snotty' & 'petulant', and it is very frequently due to discomfort/pain. Perhaps the horse CAN'T go faster than a trot under saddle without pain. Saddle discomfort/pressure points has been measured to be about 3 times as strong at a canter as at the walk & trot, for eg. Seeing as the rider is 'ignoring' her signals(she will indeed have tried to 'tell' the rider beforehand, & in inverted commas cos I realise it's not intentional), she feels the need to 'shout' about it, when the rider keeps pushing.

In saying the above, I realise that many experienced people aren't good at reading/understanding/considering the horse, let alone if you're new to the 'game', so that's where a good, considerate(of the horse as well as the rider) instructor comes in.
That's a good point. In my case the horse was known for being slow and petulant with everybody. The trainer was the one who put me on it, and basically you had to 'kick' her along. In the above poster's case, it sounded like a similar horse, one that refuses to do more than walk.

Maybe it's a saddle / pain issue in both cases. I don't know. But I would have hoped that it wasn't given that in both cases, experienced trainers / instructors were the ones putting relative beginners on these horses.
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post #26 of 34 Old 08-20-2014, 11:08 PM
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Alas & alack, lack of knowledge about saddle & body issues are common, even among professionals. Especially as horses are generally so stoic & innately & via training, tend to put up with so much, without *obvious* problems... aside from discounted behavioural ones. ...& then you get those who 'will not' see, who turn a blind eye to even obvious stuff. Lack of knowledge is one thing, 'willful ignorance' is quite another.
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post #27 of 34 Old 08-21-2014, 03:01 AM
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I have had horses for thirty years, and have lost confidence and gained it back again I would say more then once. as others have said, there is always a risk, even the most gentle well trained horse has their day. at one point, I got bucked off so bad after a back surgery, well a year after the surgery, I could not keep that horse, I would never be able to get on him again. My friend hand held her lesson horse for me and walked around with me on her back, and I rode her for awhile, took a long time to get it back. seems to me you need someone to teach you the basics of ground handling, maybe watch people ride a horse you are hesitant about riding. If you really have the horse fever, you will not give up
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post #28 of 34 Old 08-21-2014, 03:51 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Alas & alack, lack of knowledge about saddle & body issues are common, even among professionals. Especially as horses are generally so stoic & innately & via training, tend to put up with so much, without *obvious* problems... aside from discounted behavioural ones. ...& then you get those who 'will not' see, who turn a blind eye to even obvious stuff. Lack of knowledge is one thing, 'willful ignorance' is quite another.
To be honest, that's a a major problem. It's not finding the right horse to ride, it's finding the right person to teach. I see a lot of posts about getting lots of lessons, which is definitely important I think, but it's also important who you get those lessons from. I haven't been overly impressed recently. For the first few months I was too inexperienced to know better, but slowly I am realizing that the place I've been riding isn't ideal.
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post #29 of 34 Old 08-21-2014, 04:29 AM
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Originally Posted by FerrumEquus View Post
To be honest, that's a a major problem. It's not finding the right horse to ride, it's finding the right person to teach.
Yeah, that's the clincher... in everything IMO! Dealing with animals would be a whole lot easier if it weren't for the people! I used to train dogs, but, well, the dogs were never a problem, but I got too frustrated with the owners...
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post #30 of 34 Old 08-21-2014, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by FerrumEquus View Post
To be honest, that's a a major problem. It's not finding the right horse to ride, it's finding the right person to teach. I see a lot of posts about getting lots of lessons, which is definitely important I think, but it's also important who you get those lessons from. I haven't been overly impressed recently. For the first few months I was too inexperienced to know better, but slowly I am realizing that the place I've been riding isn't ideal.
Becoming a horseperson is a journey that never ends. You are ALWAYS learning. As long as you stay open to learning, you will progress. It's when your mind closes and you think you know....without actually KNOWING that the rot sets in. We all start somewhere....and often that somewhere isn't ideal. Don't let it discourage you. Educate your "eye" and then trust it to guide you. A new and better mentor awaits you.

It's amazing what you can learn in the strangest places.... :)

I'm not a complete idiot--there are parts missing!

What you have become is the price you paid to get what you used to want.
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